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    It is incredibly worrying and disturbing that some appear to condone an 11 year old disabled child being handcuffed and restrained with a mesh hood and leg straps while being held for a minor offence; it is barbaric.
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    (Original post by Ed Phelan)
    It is incredibly worrying and disturbing that some appear to condone an 11 year old disabled child being handcuffed and restrained with a mesh hood and leg straps while being held for a minor offence; it is barbaric.
    :yep:
    It's like a thread of Josef Fritzls in here.
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    (Original post by Ed Phelan)
    It is incredibly worrying and disturbing that some appear to condone an 11 year old disabled child being handcuffed and restrained with a mesh hood and leg straps while being held for a minor offence; it is barbaric.
    I'm sure their views would be different if they'd be subject to this treatment.
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    anyway the miscreant and her family will no doubt claim £1000s in compensation to help her get over her appalling ordeal at the hands of the child-tormentors.
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    I do kinda disagree with them using such measures on a child. Surely they could have just picked her up and carried her to the police station? She can't be that heavy, and the officers must have had some strength in them.

    On the other hand, handcuffs and leg restraints aren't going to scar her for life, unless the officers didn't put them on properly. They're not really that bad, so I don't think her mum should be making quite so much drama about it. The anti-spit hood might be a bit much, because having your face covered is pretty much always the most degrading way to be detained, but hopefully the officers weren't too aggressive about forcing it on her.

    I think it's stupid that everyone's focusing so much on the fact that her mum thinks she's 'disabled' though. She hasn't even been officialy diagnosed apparently, and her mum actually only thinks she has autism. Autism is not a serious disability(compared to something like Down's Syndrome), so I don't think it should factor into this case at all. As far as I'm concerned, the only factor that needs to be taken into consideration here is the fact that she was a child, and might not have been completely sure what she actually did wrong.(all kids have that problem, not just 'autistic' kids)
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    (Original post by the bear)
    anyway the miscreant and her family will no doubt claim £1000s in compensation to help her get over her appalling ordeal at the hands of the child-tormentors.
    What is the going rate for allowing your child to be tied up, bagged and left in a cell?
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    (Original post by Jazzyboy)

    I think it's stupid that everyone's focusing so much on the fact that her mum thinks she's 'disabled' though. She hasn't even been officialy diagnosed apparently, and her mum actually only thinks she has autism. Autism is not a serious disability(compared to something like Down's Syndrome), so I don't think it should factor into this case at all. As far as I'm concerned, the only factor that needs to be taken into consideration here is the fact that she was a child, and might not have been completely sure what she actually did wrong.(all kids have that problem, not just 'autistic' kids)
    It can be serious, depending on how she's affected. Some for example, don't talk and have severe behaviour problems. The lack of diagnosis doesn't matter.

    And yeah, I do know what I am talking about talk - I do have Autism and amongst other things, have serious issues communicating and do have behaviour problems.

    Seriously, go and educate yourself, instead of making out Autism to be some minor problem, when it really isn't.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It can be serious, depending on how she's affected. Some for example, don't talk and have severe behaviour problems. The lack of diagnosis doesn't matter.

    And yeah, I do know what I am talking about talk - I do have Autism and amongst other things, have serious issues communicating and do have behaviour problems.

    Seriously, go and educate yourself, instead of making out Autism to be some minor problem, when it really isn't.
    Autism does not cause those symptoms. They are merely symptoms sometimes associated with autism, usually caused by more serious medical issues, or a very poor environment. (if it weren't for a few people in my life, I actually likely wouldn't have been able to communicate with others, because my school thought I had autism and in response, discouraged me from ever trying to improve my social skills. So ironically; sometimes, issues with communication associated with autism are actually indirectly caused by being diagnosed with autism :/)

    Diagnosis with autism is actually defined by your behaviour and social skills. Your behaviour and social skills are not defined by autism, because autism isn't an inherentible condition. (yes, some people suggest that it might have genetic causes, but the idea there is that people with genetic defects are more likely to be diagnosed with autism because their defects have an impact on the way that people interact with them, and some may actually prevent people from communicating properly. So it's the underlying condition that should be considered a disability, not autism)

    tldr; Autism isn't a disability. Whatever causes you to be diagnosed with autism might be considered a disability though.
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    (Original post by Jazzyboy)
    Autism does not cause those symptoms. They are merely symptoms sometimes associated with autism, usually caused by more serious medical issues, or a very poor environment. (if it weren't for a few people in my life, I actually likely wouldn't have been able to communicate with others, because my school thought I had autism and in response, discouraged me from ever trying to improve my social skills. So ironically; sometimes, issues with communication associated with autism are actually indirectly caused by being diagnosed with autism :/)

    Diagnosis with autism is actually defined by your behaviour and social skills. Your behaviour and social skills are not defined by autism, because autism isn't an inherentible condition. (yes, some people suggest that it might have genetic causes, but the idea there is that people with genetic defects are more likely to be diagnosed with autism because their defects have an impact on the way that people interact with them, and some may actually prevent people from communicating properly. So it's the underlying condition that should be considered a disability, not autism)

    tldr; Autism isn't a disability. Whatever causes you to be diagnosed with autism might be considered a disability though.
    It is a disability. Not being able to communicate properly is disabling. It's a spectrum.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It can be serious, depending on how she's affected. Some for example, don't talk and have severe behaviour problems. The lack of diagnosis doesn't matter.

    And yeah, I do know what I am talking about talk - I do have Autism and amongst other things, have serious issues communicating and do have behaviour problems.

    Seriously, go and educate yourself, instead of making out Autism to be some minor problem, when it really isn't.
    It can be, but doesn't necessarily have to be. I know plenty of high functioning people with autism/aspergers.

    Again, in my experience, those without diagnoses tend to be high functioning and at 11, if it was really severe, I'd like to think they would have "caught it" already.

    Ultimately we do not know the details. They may have been clearly disabled and the police have behaved appallingly or they may have been very high functioning and throwing a wobbly, unrelated to their disability. We have no way of knowing.

    Serious errors have been made and people have been punished, but it is by no means as simple as "they restrained an 11 year old disabled girl, what monsters".

    Incidentally the restraining COULD have been for her own benefit. I don't actually believe this and fully agree it's playing devil's advocate to the maximum, however I wish to point out that this isn't a black and white situation and knee-jerk reactions are not helpful.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It is a disability. Not being able to communicate properly is disabling.
    This is a serious misunderstanding that I see in far too many arguments related to autism.

    Autism does not prevent you from being able to communicate properly. Not being able to communicate properly causes you to be diagnosed with autism. If you learnt to communicate properly(which you can. That part of your brain isn't dead), you would no longer be diagnosed as autistic.

    Down's Syndrome is a disability because it's actually defined by an extra chromosome. It's a tangible disability. Down's Syndrome does often hinder your ability to communicate because that part of your brain isn't developed properly. You might actually be diagnosed with autism because Down's Syndrome has hindered your ability to communicate.

    Really, autism is more of a collection of symptoms than an actual condition in itself. It in itself has no single cause, but the symptoms that form the autistic spectrum can have any of numerous causes.
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    (Original post by Jazzyboy)
    This is a serious misunderstanding that I see in far too many arguments related to autism.

    Autism does not prevent you from being able to communicate properly. Not being able to communicate properly causes you to be diagnosed with autism. If you learnt to communicate properly(which you can. That part of your brain isn't dead), you would no longer be diagnosed as autistic.

    Down's Syndrome is a disability because it's actually defined by an extra chromosome. It's a tangible disability. Down's Syndrome does often hinder your ability to communicate because that part of your brain isn't developed properly. You might actually be diagnosed with autism because Down's Syndrome has hindered your ability to communicate.

    Really, autism is more of a collection of symptoms than an actual condition in itself. It in itself has no single cause, but the symptoms that form the autistic spectrum can have any of numerous causes.
    I'm not sure why you've brought an unrelated disability into this.

    And Autism does prevent many from communicating properly. I should know. It is a serious problem for me. And many with it don't talk.
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    (Original post by lascelles101)
    your a horrible person who should come off this website
    kys
 
 
 
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