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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    It's hilarious, as if the school is really like that. As if you really teach us like that....

    Pfft please
    Oh god, everyone is so wooden while they visit - it is actually hilarious! :rofl:
    And the teachers tell you before the inspectors come, to get you to maintain the facade... :facepalm:
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I agree. What's in place isn't perfect :erm: and Dispatchers style investigating (we had someone come into our school and do that, and one of the teachers flirted with her :rofl: and it was all secretly filmed) might be a good shout. But I dunno, I guess it's just not really an attractive career for a lot of people and/or the whole keeping kids well behaved thing is more of a struggle and wears teachers down than the actual teaching itself - maybe looking into how to improve behaviour :eek4: which would be a mammoth task, is worth looking at too.

    Otherwise, you can try to get rid of 'bad' teachers but you'll just end up with more of a shortage, and you can't exactly force people to become teachers

    I would say pay them more, but honestly, I think a lot of people should be paid more and perhaps at this moment are far more deserving of it than some teachers are (not all, but some).
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Sounds like surprise Ofsted visits would be a good idea. :lol:

    But yeah, I think it'd be a good idea to address the problem at it's cause. The teaching system needs a major uphaul; if we could treat teachers better then we'd get more potential teachers attracted to the field, giving us a wider variety of choice and allowing us to select the better ones as well as improving the motivation of the current teachers, ensuring they can teach better, etc...

    I'm stopping there because I feel like I'm writing an answer for some employee motivation question for GCSE Business now. :rofl:
    Exactly! Getting the kids to treat teachers better on the other hand.. :erm:

    The problem with maths as well and the maths shortage, I believe, is that if you're doing maths then it opens up so many doors and you can pick a lot of things, ya know, that can be more interesting or something like that and you can get started straight away rather than going off to do a PGCE or whatever.

    But it'd also come down to money as well :erm: and financing and all of that political stuff.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Exactly! Getting the kids to treat teachers better on the other hand.. :erm:

    The problem with maths as well and the maths shortage, I believe, is that if you're doing maths then it opens up so many doors and you can pick a lot of things, ya know, that can be more interesting or something like that and you can get started straight away rather than going off to do a PGCE or whatever.

    But it'd also come down to money as well :erm: and financing and all of that political stuff.
    There is an issue with this also. I think disruptive kids are disgusting, if we can throw them out of the the window that would be great.
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    Oh god, everyone is so wooden while they visit - it is actually hilarious! :rofl:
    And the teachers tell you before the inspectors come, to get you to maintain the facade... :facepalm:
    Omg in my old school we'd basically all run for the dinner queue but when Ofsted came every teacher would hold us back for a few mins and tell us not to run...
    They'd stop us at the school gate, give us wipes to take off our make up and force us to do our ties up
    And we'd all suddenly be doing some next level activities in class with flashcards, in teams and all sorts (and the classic 'lesson reflection' at the end)

    Also I was never late to lesson, ever, but the one day I was, it was an Ofsted inspection :teehee:
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Exactly! Getting the kids to treat teachers better on the other hand.. :erm:

    The problem with maths as well and the maths shortage, I believe, is that if you're doing maths then it opens up so many doors and you can pick a lot of things, ya know, that can be more interesting or something like that and you can get started straight away rather than going off to do a PGCE or whatever.

    But it'd also come down to money as well :erm: and financing and all of that political stuff.
    I think that would come naturally, if we treated teachers better and got to get people attracted to the teaching field, giving us an overall boost in quality of teachers, then kids would, for the most part, treat them better. Or at least, I would hope so, that sounds overly-idealistic... :erm:

    That's actually a really good point that I hadn't thought of myself! Woah, it's so true. (can't lie, it's slightly comforting to me as well... )

    Argh, yeah. Always money and politics in the way! On a brighter note though, to combat all the doom and gloom, in a global arena, the UK's education system is pretty darn great. Sure, it has it's problems and flaws (what doesn't?), but in the grand scheme of things, it's quite good.
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Omg in my old school we'd basically all run for the dinner queue but when Ofsted came every teacher would hold us back for a few mins and tell us not to run...
    They'd stop us at the school gate, give us wipes to take off our make up and force us to do our ties up
    And we'd all suddenly be doing some next level activities in class with flashcards, in teams and all sorts (and the classic 'lesson reflection' at the end

    Also I was never late to lesson, ever, but the one day I was, it was an Ofsted inspection :teehee:
    Same! It's actually hilarious.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    If it helps, there are also students out there who don't even have the benefit of a school, let alone a teacher! Imagine having to run around begging your exam centre to sort out why your unique candidate number has suddenly changed because you don't have a school to sort that out for you whilst also simultaneously trying to get yourself 3 A*'s without the help of a classroom, textbook or teacher as well as juggling STEP.

    Not that I'm trying to trivialise your problems, they do sound bad and something definitely does need to be done, but there's no point getting upset over "oh, someone is getting a better teaching than I as", that'll always be the case, things are unfair all the time, you just need to view them as opportunities instead. You getting to teach yourself a bunch of A-Levels is a good thing, it'll prepare you for university all that much better. So what if some rich Eton kid is getting taught how to get an A*? You're engaging with your subject that you find genuinely interesting and exploring them on your own terms, that's an invaluable experience!

    That said, I can sort of understand what you're feeling and I do agree that genuinely horrible teachers do need to be rooted out of the system.
    So true. I couldn't agree more.
    This was me and my class mates last year. In the space of nine months, we had 4 different physics teachers, 3 different English lit teachers with the two we knew well leaving 2 weeks before our AS exams, 3 different maths teachers then chemistry was the only subject in which we had a stable teacher with for the whole AS year. The others left, with new ones coming in each term or there about. Then sometimes, we were given covers who weren't even qualified in teaching but were undergrad students. Even our chemistry teacher, though she was stable around October time she took a two week holiday without informing the class meaning half way, we had covers with no set work or homework.

    It was a complete mess- you'd establish relationships with teachers where you'd feel comfortable in their classes, feeling as if you're being supported then suddenly the next term you're given a whole new teacher who isn't even familiar with the area or school and sometimes they may not understand English well.

    Most of my friends teachers from last year, at my previous sixth form college just came out of university too, finishing their teacher's training so they had young teachers who had never taught before. After all of this though, I realised it wasn't only because of this to why I had failed last year though 50% of us are repeating this year (no joke, the stats are shocking). If I had done more as in the revision, seeking help outside of school like the others who did where they had made study groups and even made their own weekend/half term revision classes- I would have been at A2 finishing. Luckily now, I'm at a better place. I can only hope I now have better grades.
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    Oh god, everyone is so wooden while they visit - it is actually hilarious! :rofl:
    And the teachers tell you before the inspectors come, to get you to maintain the facade... :facepalm:
    I would do my best to be on my worst behaviour whenever we had an inspector over. Got me into plenty of trouble after, but it was so worth it to see the looks on the teachers face as I took my food out in class and ate or treated the bin as a basketball hoop. :rofl:
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Exactly! Getting the kids to treat teachers better on the other hand.. :erm:

    The problem with maths as well and the maths shortage, I believe, is that if you're doing maths then it opens up so many doors and you can pick a lot of things, ya know, that can be more interesting or something like that and you can get started straight away rather than going off to do a PGCE or whatever.

    But it'd also come down to money as well :erm: and financing and all of that political stuff.
    My GCSE Maths teacher actually had a sports degree rather than a Maths one
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    From the looks of it, BTEC is coursework, while A Levels are exams. So I would say A Level is better, certainly if they had January exams still.

    The problem you're having is doing it at school. Self-studing A Levels mean you can do all the crap he's doing. All you have to study for is the exam. Imagine having a whole year just to memorise 10-pages worth of material for an exam.

    The problem I've had is the time limit on exams, I'm as reckless and unprofessional as I can and still it's a race to the final page. I can only feel the school/college students that do well are made into machines, while everyone else finishes an exam in time becuase they skip a load of questions and spend a bit of time crying.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    There is an issue with this also. I think disruptive kids are disgusting, if we can throw them out of the the window that would be great.
    I wouldn't stop you, but I would pretend to know nothing about it

    Now that I think about it, it's quite interesting when I think about all of the teachers that I've been taught by and how good they are at controlling the class (and they tend to get stuff done when it comes to teaching things.) You'd have ones where you can't say a word or toe any kind of line or you'd get into actual trouble, which I think worked pretty well. Then on the opposite end you just have substitute teachers that don't stand a chance and they must feel pretty awful when they do it, but they have to call on the support of another teacher. :hide: always hated when that had to happen. It's just such a demanding job as it stands, ya know, and that certainly does not help, but at the same time you're teaching kids.. and that's exactly what they're like.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I think that would come naturally, if we treated teachers better and got to get people attracted to the teaching field, giving us an overall boost in quality of teachers, then kids would, for the most part, treat them better. Or at least, I would hope so, that sounds overly-idealistic... :erm:

    That's actually a really good point that I hadn't thought of myself! Woah, it's so true. (can't lie, it's slightly comforting to me as well... )

    Argh, yeah. Always money and politics in the way! On a brighter note though, to combat all the doom and gloom, in a global arena, the UK's education system is pretty darn great. Sure, it has it's problems and flaws (what doesn't?), but in the grand scheme of things, it's quite good.
    God
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    I think most people have a different experience of it and it depends on your experience. It is okay, I'm thankful that I get to receive and education but at the end of the day, things need to be done and we must not dismiss that.
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    Life's not fair.
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    (Original post by Cherry82)
    This was me and my class mates last year. [...]
    Sounds like a terrible experience! I can only imagine how stressful that must have been. Glad that it's over now (is it?) though!

    [...] Luckily now, I'm at a better place. I can only hope I now have better grades.
    Ah, I'm glad it's all worked out in the end. There's probable also the fact that you even learnt some interesting lessons from that (frankly horrible) experience that'll come in useful later on. Good luck with your grades, I'm sure they'll be fab!
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    My GCSE Maths teacher actually had a sports degree rather than a Maths one
    :dontknow: I think a maths degree for just teaching GCSE would be overkill (given the stuff that you study :erm:) so I dunno.. wouldn't have any complaints. And if there's a shortage.. why not?

    (Original post by Zacken)
    I think that would come naturally, if we treated teachers better and got to get people attracted to the teaching field, giving us an overall boost in quality of teachers, then kids would, for the most part, treat them better. Or at least, I would hope so, that sounds overly-idealistic... :erm:

    That's actually a really good point that I hadn't thought of myself! Woah, it's so true. (can't lie, it's slightly comforting to me as well... )

    Argh, yeah. Always money and politics in the way! On a brighter note though, to combat all the doom and gloom, in a global arena, the UK's education system is pretty darn great. Sure, it has it's problems and flaws (what doesn't?), but in the grand scheme of things, it's quite good.
    Mmm.. apart from that last bit, which is what I think would be the main problem, it does sound pretty good.

    :lol: you'll be fine at least, not sure about the rest of us maths graduates!

    Oh for sure, and other stuff as well.. people might be complaining and campaigning but it's pretty good. You'd do well to find anywhere that's doing it perfectly.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I would do my best to be on my worst behaviour whenever we had an inspector over. Got me into plenty of trouble after, but it was so worth it to see the looks on the teachers face as I took my food out in class and ate or treated the bin as a basketball hoop. :rofl:
    Zacken! :zomg: I wish I had more guts to stand up to my teachers like you did, though.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I wouldn't stop you, but I would pretend to know nothing about it

    Now that I think about it, it's quite interesting when I think about all of the teachers that I've been taught by and how good they are at controlling the class (and they tend to get stuff done when it comes to teaching things.) You'd have ones where you can't say a word or toe any kind of line or you'd get into actual trouble, which I think worked pretty well. Then on the opposite end you just have substitute teachers that don't stand a chance and they must feel pretty awful when they do it, but they have to call on the support of another teacher. :hide: always hated when that had to happen. It's just such a demanding job as it stands, ya know, and that certainly does not help, but at the same time you're teaching kids.. and that's exactly what they're like.
    I agree with all of this. In my own experience, I had about two teachers from my lessons that no one would dare disobey, or talk against. Even the disruptive kids were silent in their lessons.

    I also had numerous substitutes and one of the worst cases is when my year 9 humanities class had to go through about 5 teachers and in the end one just gave up on turning up to teach us Obviously we all just took that as a chance to mess about
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I wouldn't stop you, but I would pretend to know nothing about it

    Now that I think about it, it's quite interesting when I think about all of the teachers that I've been taught by and how good they are at controlling the class (and they tend to get stuff done when it comes to teaching things.) You'd have ones where you can't say a word or toe any kind of line or you'd get into actual trouble, which I think worked pretty well. Then on the opposite end you just have substitute teachers that don't stand a chance and they must feel pretty awful when they do it, but they have to call on the support of another teacher. :hide: always hated when that had to happen. It's just such a demanding job as it stands, ya know, and that certainly does not help, but at the same time you're teaching kids.. and that's exactly what they're like.
    Well that is what some kids are like, I was always told to respect my elders so I never disrupted like some of the people I went to school with.

    Better teachers can control the classroom.

    I had teachers that would make friends with the "frightening" students but it really didn't work because while they were discussing the X-factor with them in our science lessons so that they wouldn't kick off, it wasted other student's teaching time (like mine but it's okay, I did well in the end ...but still )
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    (Original post by hololand)
    So 2 years ago I made the choice to go through with A levels, My best friend chose the route of B-Tec level 3 extended diploma. Initially I laughed at him and thought he had made a stupid foolish decision.

    By the end of the first year I was getting weighed down by the 7 days a week constant revision from maths, physics, business studies and that coursework from art. Meanwhile my friend was merrily on his way with his 3 days a week of relaxed work and practical outdoors filming.

    And we arrive at the now. I have not been able to go out with friends on many occasions due to work. Nor have I had any significant free time to pursue my passion and hobbies. I have been locked away revising information that I will likely never need again just to get the grades for a university course of my choice.

    My friend meanwhile has already finished for the year, during which he has pursued and integrated his course into his passion for BMX. He has had more free time in the last two weeks than I have had in the entire year.

    And he just got his results back. Now at GCSE you must bear in mind he was a B/C student, I was slightly higher with pretty much straight B's. However he just got given D*D*D*, which is the equivalent of 420 ucas points or 3 A*'s at A level. Meanwhile after 7 days a week of far more difficult and challenging work constantly throughout the year, I have barely attained a prediction of BBB.

    I don't see how it is fair that 3 days of much easier and far more enjoyable work a week. Can almost DOUBLE the amount of ucas points of far more stressful, much more difficult A levels.

    Now obviously I am happy for my friend, I am currently contemplating my life and why I didn't choose the same option as him. But how... HOW is this fair?

    I have done just over 2x the work of easily 5x the difficulty and I am getting HALF THE REWARD?.

    Now obviously I cannot change the entire UK education system. But I warn anybody considering A levels to read up on this and consider how much pain you will go through for such little reward. Do BTEC's.
    UCAS points are redundant for any university that has even a glimmer of prestige. Offers from good universities are based on grades, and I'm pretty sure most won't regard 3D* as equal to 3A*, it's just absolutely idiotic to do so. So just focus on improving your grades and try not to distract yourself with his attainment.


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