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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    I second that btw, with some of the teachers at my school, I'm amazed anyone can get an A* yet we are considered an 'inner state school' so dont get the summer schools others do
    thirded

    One of my friends at school is American and she only came here in year 10, aid she couldn't understand how this school (my school) could expect to get any A's even at GCSE
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    But what do you mean by well-rounded? Private school pupils may also be considered well-rounded because of the atmosphere of their schools, their extra-curricular activities and broader education etc. It's subjective.

    And what do you mean by "the real world". Literally speaking, private schools are as much part of the "real world" as state schools. And for many private school pupils, the sort of society they have at school is the world that they will know through life as they move on to a comfortable university, a good job, live in a middle-class area, and send their own children to a private school. Also, it is wrong to think of all private schools as ivory towers, the school which I have just left is located on a cramped site in an inner city area.
    Whilst I accept your point about extra curricular activities etc., I honestly do not think it is healthy for a child only to be surrounded by other affluent, middle class children. At a state school one comes into contact with the full sweep of classes - in my experience people from state schools have far less prejudice towards the working class or the poor as they will have made friends who are not as priviliged as themselves and will have got to know many who would simply not be at any private school. As for the "real world", the fact that some from private schools seem to be convinced that they will be stabbed any time they step withing 100m of a state school seems to only contribute towards our already-unhealthy paranoid society.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    From my experience, the geek level at State and Private schools seems to be no different. Whilst private schools have more geeks, state schools have better geeks. But I definitely agree that state school people are more well rounded - they haven't been sheltered from the real world.
    "From my experience, the geek level at State and Private schools seems to be no different." - OK, I'm sure thats sarcastic.

    Also, one thing: When I referred to normal school people, I shopuld have clarified that I was talking about clever normal school people (I went on the ox sutton trust thing).

    Normal school people who are clever (comparatively) are more fun/well rounded/slightly bonkers/interesting than reared from age 3 middle class boring private schoolers.

    As for the last poster who said "what do you mean by well rounded? private school people do extra curricular etc." - I think you don't grasp what we're on about, we're talking about personality, having a laugh, the slight weird/insaneness etc. that's been naturally developed by living in a real world background.

    Fencing with middle class snobs is hardly anything to contribute to well roundedness! We're talking about character!
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    That's a fair observation and good evidence, but it's not the case across the board is it? There are at least a fraction of teachers who would be willing to switch between the sectors.
    My new deputy head is an example of this. He used to teach in an extremely good private school but he got 'bored' and he came to our school because he wanted to make a difference. He said that if he wasn't in the lesson at the other school the kids would still do the same amount of work but in our school if he's not there we do nothing, but if he is we actually learn stuff and do work, thus he's making a difference.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    I seem to remember that you have admitted previously that you hardly know anyone who has attended a private school, so I don't quite see on what you base your assertion. Private schools can often have a high proportion of hearty rugger bugger types, who, although they might not be particularly socially desirable either, are far from geeky, as well as a good proportion who are frightfully hedonistic.

    But what do you mean by well-rounded? Private school pupils may also be considered well-rounded because of the atmosphere of their schools, their extra-curricular activities and broader education etc. It's subjective.

    And what do you mean by "the real world". Literally speaking, private schools are as much part of the "real world" as state schools. And for many private school pupils, the sort of society they have at school is the world that they will know through life as they move on to a comfortable university, a good <A TITLE="Click for more information about job" STYLE="text-decoration: none; border-bottom: medium solid green;" HREF="http://search.targetwords.com/u.search?x=5977|1||||job|AA1VDw" >job</A>, live in a middle-class area, and send their own children to a private school. Also, it is wrong to think of all private schools as ivory towers, the school which I have just left is located on a cramped site in an inner city area.
    "Real world" - The real world, yes. Come on, don't be naive here, please.

    "It's subjective" - Well obviously, but I'm 99.9% sure that my comments are right.

    As for "you haven't been to a private school etc."

    1.) You go to only 1 private school in the whole country.
    2.) And are you an expert on normal schools?
    3.) The Oxford people agree with me (uni students etc), even the ones who went to private school!
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    As for the last poster who said "what do you mean by well rounded? private school people do extra curricular etc." - I think you don't grasp what we're on about, we're talking about personality, having a laugh, the slight weird/insaneness etc. that's been naturally developed by living in a real world background.

    Fencing with middle class snobs is hardly anything to contribute to well roundedness! We're talking about character!
    The first school I went to was a prep school, but it was a very cheap one, as a result there were people from poor backgrounds whose parents worked night shifts in tescos to pay the fees. If anything I have gained more personaility by seeing how dedicated some people can be. And you seem to forget the point that most people socialise outside of school, I have friends from cricket, lacross, music, drama none of these go to my school so i'm hardly sheltered from the real world.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    Whilst I accept your point about extra curricular activities etc., I honestly do not think it is healthy for a child only to be surrounded by other affluent, middle class children.
    Social classes naturally socially interact within their class, that is pretty much the definition of the phrase. It's natural and I don't see that it should really be a bad thing.

    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    As for the "real world", the fact that some from private schools seem to be convinced that they will be stabbed any time they step withing 100m of a state school seems to only contribute towards our already-unhealthy paranoid society.
    This isn't an actual belief though, I have only heard the idea as a bantering joke -- I'm sure state school pupils make equivalents about private schools, it's just natural when there is some sense of rivalry. Almost everyone at my school (at least vaguely) knows a few people at state schools, most went to state primary schools, a fair few have siblings at state secondary schools.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    Whilst I accept your point about extra curricular activities etc., I honestly do not think it is healthy for a child only to be surrounded by other affluent, middle class children. At a state school one comes into contact with the full sweep of classes - in my experience people from state schools have far less prejudice towards the working class or the poor as they will have made friends who are not as priviliged as themselves and will have got to know many who would simply not be at any private school. As for the "real world", the fact that some from private schools seem to be convinced that they will be stabbed any time they step withing 100m of a state school seems to only contribute towards our already-unhealthy paranoid society.
    I certainly feel that normal school people who are intelligent (not the masses of ******s who go to normal school, I know about that, we'll ignore those for now) are more socially tolerant as they do experience a wider spectrum of people of different race, background etc.

    "Real world" - Common, typical society.
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    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    The first school I went to was a prep school, but it was a very cheap one, as a result there were people from poor backgrounds whose parents worked night shifts in tescos to pay the fees. If anything I have gained more personaility by seeing how dedicated some people can be. And you seem to forget the point that most people socialise outside of school, I have friends from cricket, lacross, music, drama none of these go to my school so i'm hardly sheltered from the real world.
    1.) I was generalising. And please don't think I discriminate private school people; if a person is cool and friendly and good to socialise with then I don't care where they are from! (felt Ihad to get that in!)

    2.) Of course, but on average a private school community is more secluded from typical society than a normal comp, so that's what I'm sort of getting at.
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    Two kids. One goes and lives abroad, goes to an international school out there costing more than £20,000 a year. The other goes to comp that's like at the bottom of the league table. How can they be expected to get the same GCSE/A Level results the one abroad "must" do better, I mean the parents paying 20k must be paying for something, right? Otherwise what's the point?
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    So are we meant to believe that if one goes to a private school he cannot socially interact with those from other classes? That is so naieve, and if that was the case then it could easily work the other way round too. At the end of the day, people that go to independent school may start off in better surroundings and be fortunate, but eventually it is the person themselves who makes the difference.
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    (Original post by me!)
    Two kids. One goes and lives abroad, goes to an international school out there costing more than £20,000 a year. The other goes to comp that's like at the bottom of the league table. How can they be expected to get the same GCSE/A Level results the one abroad "must" do better, I mean the parents paying 20k must be paying for something, right? Otherwise what's the point?
    Well obviously, that's why I don't agree with buying qualifications.

    But in the end it doesn't really matter, for uni application anyway.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    "Real world" - The real world, yes. Come on, don't be naive here, please.
    Yes, I do perfectly understand what is colloquially meant by the phrase "the real world", however here I felt it was useful here to take it back to its literal meaning.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    "It's subjective" - Well obviously, but I'm 99.9% sure that my comments are right.
    I said that about what it means to be a well-rounded person, it wasn't meant as a direct parry to your assertions.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    1.) You go to only 1 private school in the whole country.
    True, but I know it to be fairly typical of the fairly modest, academically-driven independent school. I fully admit that I'm not arguing for the £20k a year boarding schools.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    2.) And are you an expert on normal schools?
    No, I admit I am not, but then again I haven't been writing about them. And I suggest you don't use the phrase "normal schools", as to many people a private school is perfectly normal.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    3.) The Oxford people agree with me (uni students etc), even the ones who went to private school!
    You are refering to the idea that private schools are "geekier"? I don't see why the opinion of Oxford students in this matter is necessarily more valid than anyone else's, and can you find any great record of them saying this?
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    (Original post by masiftinkerbell)
    So are we meant to believe that if one goes to a private school he cannot socially interact with those from other classes? That is so naieve, and if that was the case then it could easily work the other way round too. At the end of the day, people that go to independent school may start off in better surroundings and be fortunate, but eventually it is the person themselves who makes the difference.
    I was talking about the stereotype, but I feel it does have some truth in it.
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    That stereotype only exists in your head! If you actually knew some people from private schools you might not be so biased.
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    What are foundation schools and how are they meant to make the education system any better?
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    OHHH WHO CARES!!!!!! Your stuck with the school your in, deal with it!!!!...LOL
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    I go to private school, and I don't think I conform to any of the stereotypes around. I don't think they should be abolished, people have the right to choose.
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    (Original post by masiftinkerbell)
    OHHH WHO CARES!!!!!! Your stuck with the school your in, deal with it!!!!...LOL
    Very true and that's exactly what I've been doing for the past 5 years.

    But the education system obviously needs to be improved, kids shouldn't just have to be making do in the future.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    Yes, I do perfectly understand what is colloquially meant by the phrase "the real world", however here I felt it was useful here to take it back to its literal meaning.

    I said that about what it means to be a well-rounded person, it wasn't meant as a direct parry to your assertions.

    True, but I know it to be fairly typical of the fairly modest, academically-driven independent school. I fully admit that I'm not arguing for the £20k a year boarding schools.

    No, I admit I am not, but then again I haven't been writing about them. And I suggest you don't use the phrase "normal schools", as to many people a private school is perfectly normal.

    You are refering to the idea that private schools are "geekier"? I don't see why the opinion of Oxford students in this matter is necessarily more valid than anyone else's, and can you find any great record of them saying this?
    1.) Why was it useful to go to its "literal meaning" when in this discussion it was obvious how we meant for the word to be interpreted? it's like someone saying "that shirt was so gay" and someone saying "how can a shirt be homosexual?" (ok, you get the point).

    2.) "I said that about what it means to be a well-rounded person" - You backed this up with a private school person participating in extra curricular stuff; what's this got to do with well roundedness? their parents are often paying a fortune, they often have to do some anyway. I'm talking about personality, sociability, tolerance knwoing the "real world", along with the other stuff - Notice how you talked about "well roundedness" in the context of filling in a UCAS Form.

    3.) "True, but I know it to be fairly typical of the fairly modest, academically-driven independent school." - OK, so why is it that when I base my comments on this "typical average" that you (maybe not, possibly others) then revert to the "but others are different and it's not always like this" idea?

    4.) "I haven't been writing about them" - OK, that's your choice, but I shall comment based on what I know - And it's not as if I extend to "every private school person is a complete rich snob, ponce, with zero social tolerance" etc.

    5.) "I suggest you don't use the phrase "normal schools", as to many people a private school is perfectly normal." - Sorry, I've been using that all week as the people in my group have been doing (while I was away). "The average school" is what I'm getting at.

    6.) "You are refering to the idea that private schools are "geekier"? I don't see why the opinion of Oxford students in this matter is necessarily more valid than anyone else's, and can you find any great record of them saying this" - I feel that I should clarify AGAIN that I was talking about those from comprehensives who are comparatively intelligent to their comp counterparts; I do acknowledge that there are more ******s going to comps than private schools.

    I'd say the average private schooler with intelligence is geekier than one from a comprehensive, based on what I know, my experience in the past week and comments from Oxford students; some being from private schools, some not.
 
 
 
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