MAT Prep Thread - 2nd November 2016

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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    lmao i got 45
    Why? And what questions couldn't you complete?
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    (Original post by Marxist)
    Why? And what questions couldn't you complete?
    i didnt get question 3 and asked my teacher who said it was core 4 stuff.

    question 4 i was sort of on the right track but ran out of time so scored lowly

    and i sort of just failed the multiple choice, im going through it now though and getting a lot of the right solutions this time
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    i didnt get question 3 and asked my teacher who said it was core 4 stuff.
    That's untrue.
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    i didnt get question 3 and asked my teacher who said it was core 4 stuff.
    I agree with Zacken - look at the solution, there's no C4 knowledge needed.
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    i didnt get question 3 and asked my teacher who said it was core 4 stuff.

    question 4 i was sort of on the right track but ran out of time so scored lowly

    and i sort of just failed the multiple choice, im going through it now though and getting a lot of the right solutions this time
    Your teacher is wrong obviously. The MAT only requires you to have C1-C2 knowledge. Be careful of using C3-C4 knowledge on certain questions - you end up making things more complicated than they seem. You should be able to do all questions with what you learnt from C1-C2.
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    Hi folks, I'm preparing for the MAT right now, for Maths and Computer Science. I'm doing a paper a week right now, which should give enough time to check things inbetween.

    I'm in Scotland, and C1/C2 doesn't match up exactly with Higher. I'm just learning a few things during Advanced Higher (like sums of series and the Binomial Thereom), but is there anything that I'm missing that's not in Higher or Advanced Higher? I'm aware of the trapezium rule, and most likely periodicity of functions (like sin(sqrt(x)) has the waves get further and further apart), but I think I might be missing a few other things.
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    (Original post by lewman99)
    Hi folks, I'm preparing for the MAT right now, for Maths and Computer Science. I'm doing a paper a week right now, which should give enough time to check things inbetween.

    I'm in Scotland, and C1/C2 doesn't match up exactly with Higher. I'm just learning a few things during Advanced Higher (like sums of series and the Binomial Thereom), but is there anything that I'm missing that's not in Higher or Advanced Higher? I'm aware of the trapezium rule, and most likely periodicity of functions (like sin(sqrt(x)) has the waves get further and further apart), but I think I might be missing a few other things.
    You can just google the maths specification for a given exam board and compare it with yours.


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    (Original post by lewman99)
    Hi folks, I'm preparing for the MAT right now, for Maths and Computer Science. I'm doing a paper a week right now, which should give enough time to check things inbetween.

    I'm in Scotland, and C1/C2 doesn't match up exactly with Higher. I'm just learning a few things during Advanced Higher (like sums of series and the Binomial Thereom), but is there anything that I'm missing that's not in Higher or Advanced Higher? I'm aware of the trapezium rule, and most likely periodicity of functions (like sin(sqrt(x)) has the waves get further and further apart), but I think I might be missing a few other things.
    I've attached the MAT specification (from the Oxford Maths Dept website).
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf MAT syllabus.pdf (60.3 KB, 28 views)
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    Can I get some help on Q3 on spec paper A? (ii) onwards..
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    (Original post by Hussain919)
    Can I get some help on Q3 on spec paper A? (ii) onwards..
    okay at first glance this question seems to be about how the minimum of a function may not necessarily be at the x value where  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} = 0 due to restrictions in the domain. (you may not have learnt what a domain is yet, its basically just all the x values the function can take)

    so for example, if I asked you for the minimum point of f(x) = \displaystyle x^2 + 4 you would do  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} = 0 so  \displaystyle 2x = 0 , therefore  \displaystyle x=0 and  \displaystyle f(0) = 0^2 + 4 =4 so the minimum point is  \displaystyle (0,4)

    However if I asked you for the minimum point of  \displaystyle x^2 + 4 but this time restricted the domain to, lets say,  \displaystyle 2 \leq x \leq 6 you couldnt just use  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} since x=0 doesn't lie in the domain.

    I dont think there's a better way to do something like this other than to sketch it. So as you see from the picture I attached, with no restrictions on the domain just use  \displaystyle dy/dx for your max/minimum howeer if theres a restriction on the domain then you may need to just sketch it and go from there.

    so just sketch the function with a value of p greater than 1, (do one of those tables with x values and y values if you really need to) and go from there.

    Another hint if you need it below
    Spoiler:
    Show
    if the minimum needs to be worked out using a sketch (ie dy/dx = 0 etc etc gives back a value of x not in the domain) then your minimum value will lie at one of the extremities of the domain
    Attached Images
     
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    https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/fi...nts/test09.pdf
    Q1, (D)

    I thought this was a relatively straightforward question but I turned out to be wrong and I don't understand why the answer is C (I chose B)

    I first summed the series and noticed it had this pattern:
    +1,-1,+2,-2,+3,-3..

    Seeing this, i realised that the n must be odd (so that it will make the -1^n positive) and then that leaves 1*101 which is > 100.
    Could someone tell me what i'm doing wrong please
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    okay at first glance this question seems to be about how the minimum of a function may not necessarily be at the x value where  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} = 0 due to restrictions in the domain. (you may not have learnt what a domain is yet, its basically just all the x values the function can take)

    so for example, if I asked you for the minimum point of f(x) = \displaystyle x^2 + 4 you would do  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} = 0 so  \displaystyle 2x = 0 , therefore  \displaystyle x=0 and  \displaystyle f(0) = 0^2 + 4 =4 so the minimum point is  \displaystyle (0,4)

    However if I asked you for the minimum point of  \displaystyle x^2 + 4 but this time restricted the domain to, lets say,  \displaystyle 2 \leq x \leq 6 you couldnt just use  \displaystyle \frac{dy}{dx} since x=0 doesn't lie in the domain.

    I dont think there's a better way to do something like this other than to sketch it. So as you see from the picture I attached, with no restrictions on the domain just use  \displaystyle dy/dx for your max/minimum howeer if theres a restriction on the domain then you may need to just sketch it and go from there.

    so just sketch the function with a value of p greater than 1, (do one of those tables with x values and y values if you really need to) and go from there.

    Another hint if you need it below
    Spoiler:
    Show
    if the minimum needs to be worked out using a sketch (ie dy/dx = 0 etc etc gives back a value of x not in the domain) then your minimum value will lie at one of the extremities of the domain
    i just completed the square
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    (Original post by blankboi)
    https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/fi...nts/test09.pdf
    Q1, (D)

    I thought this was a relatively straightforward question but I turned out to be wrong and I don't understand why the answer is C (I chose B)

    I first summed the series and noticed it had this pattern:
    +1,-1,+2,-2,+3,-3..

    Seeing this, i realised that the n must be odd (so that it will make the -1^n positive) and then that leaves 1*101 which is > 100.
    Could someone tell me what i'm doing wrong please
    I think it would be more productive to view the series like this:

    1 + (-2 + 3) + (-4 + 5) + (-6 + 7)
    or if you prefer, 1 - (2 - 3) - (4 - 5) - ...
    either way you notice you're getting 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 ...
    so the sum to the first term is 1, to the third term is 2, the sum to the fifth term is 3, the sum to the seventh term is 4, etc. etc., right?
    indeed it would seem apparent that for the odd terms the sum is (n + 1)/2. Clearly it's not going to be an even term you want, as the previous odd term sum is going to be larger. So as you said the n must be odd. Then you simply solve for (n + 1)/2 = 100 (you know this will happen as the series of odd terms goes up in 1s so takes every positive integer)
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    (Original post by blankboi)
    https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/fi...nts/test09.pdf
    Q1, (D)

    I thought this was a relatively straightforward question but I turned out to be wrong and I don't understand why the answer is C (I chose B)

    I first summed the series and noticed it had this pattern:
    +1,-1,+2,-2,+3,-3..

    Seeing this, i realised that the n must be odd (so that it will make the -1^n positive) and then that leaves 1*101 which is > 100.
    Could someone tell me what i'm doing wrong please
    1-2+3-4+5....
    1-2 = -1
    -1+3 = 2
    2-4=-2

    so adding them up goes 1,-1,2,-2,3,-3 etc so by the time it gets to 99,-99,+100
    there would have been (2*99)+1 terms, which is 199.
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    i just completed the square
    ah yea completing the square is useful
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    is the question 4 that was on the first page of this convo actually a part of the MAT?
    the one with the stochastic differential equations
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    (Original post by BManMagic)
    is the question 4 that was on the first page of this convo actually a part of the MAT?
    the one with the stochastic differential equations
    no
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    im running out of things to do, how are all you revising for this? I have too much time and not enough work
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    im running out of things to do, how are all you revising for this? I have too much time and not enough work
    probably means you should chill out a little...
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    probably means you should chill out a little...
    i need to do well in MAT to compensate for my **** grades lol.

    Ive already done 6 papers but dont want to do any more as I need to save some for later

    So far I am just doing C1,C2 papers and some aea,smc and nrich questions.
 
 
 
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