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State schools in England and Wales to phase out teaching Foreign languages? Watch

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    Wonderful news. I never felt like being able to say in French what stationery I had in my pencil case was of any use.
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    (Original post by IronicalMan)
    If your not doing anything that relates to it in the future, then no. Only English and mathematics is essential.
    and even then a lot of the stuff taught in gcse maths is just ridiculous and will never be used by anyone who isn't continuing with maths. gcse english (both lang + lit) focus more on how well you can pick out hidden meanings rather than writing grammatically correct english and how to craft language. there is an argument against every single subject studied in school, about whether it is really useful.
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    (Original post by lostintrnslation)
    and even then a lot of the stuff taught in gcse maths is just ridiculous and will never be used by anyone who isn't continuing with maths. gcse english (both lang + lit) focus more on how well you can pick out hidden meanings rather than writing grammatically correct english and how to craft language. there is an argument against every single subject studied in school, about whether it is really useful.
    I agree with that, wasting 5 years on worthless gcse's is another problem, they should be taking all the non academic but clever kids to do stuff like trades.
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Here is where the advantage of some non-european languages shows, for example basic Chinese grammar is soooo simple you can just focus on vocabulary at the start, adnittedly it does get more challenging later on but from my experience not nearly as much as all those French irregular verbs I had drummed into me for 8 years... Also, using immersive learning techniques can reduce the emphasis on memorising grammar rules as you learn in a more intuitive and fun way



    We really need programs to entice in foreign language teachers from abroad, that way students will be taught by native speakers and there is less of a problem with a lack of teachers due to the lack of language grads in the UK
    Ideally we'd do more to encourage home students to go into teaching languages, because they're often more aware of how the language works on a technical level, whereas native speakers can be more "that's just how it is"

    I actually got rejected from a teaching programme for not being a native speaker which knocked my confidence a lot, and encouraged me to go abroad to teach*
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    (Original post by the bear)
    learning a foreign language is very difficult for Brexit type children: it is only fair to stop teaching these irrelevant tongues now that the People have spoken
    I voted leave yet I am a staunch advocate of intense language teaching in schools
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    (Original post by jneill)
    That's rubbish. The Labour government stopped modern languages being compulsory at GCSE level in 2004 - when we were in the EU...

    You might be thinking of the EBacc which was introduced in 2012 and required a modern language but it was never compulsory to do EBacc, and it was a British government initiative anyway.

    Nothing to do with people in the EU coming over here making our laws...
    It was in 2000


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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    It was in 2000
    Still nothing to do with the EU though.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    If we were serious about teaching languages we wouldn't wait till pupils were 11, they'd start at 5. Our efforts to teach it have never been more than lip service, so it's no real loss.
    This is similar to how I feel, the loss isn't the fact we've stopped teaching the second language, it's the change in direction being signaled by the government. They should have made a real effort to start children off young on learning the second language.
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    The youth did vote. Their turnout was only slightly below the national average.
    36% of 18~24 year olds is a pretty awful turnout for an issue of such magnitude that the eligible voting youth (apparently) feel so strongly about.

    It's almost as if most could care less, while at least at the 25~34yo age bracket it was better at just over half turning up (58%).

    While the majority of these two age brackets were large pro remain, sizeable minorities of them (24% and 39% respectively) were for Brexit.

    If we take the grand view the vast bulk of British youth between 18~34 could have given less of a **** about the EU, at least enough to vote on the matter.

    I'd say the youth didn't vote. Especially because if they had, and if the age-bracket's voting split had remained (with the majority for remain) they could have negated the much feared "grey vote".

    One thing I have taken a massive dislike to in the EU ref and aftermath is this tired meme that "the old stole our future!". No. voter engagement is a good thing and older voters are very active with their franchise.

    Apathetic youth "stole it" if we assume that vocal remainers represent the very strong and sincere pro-remain feelings of some super-majority of young people, that still couldn't bring it's voting power to the ballot box when it mattered.
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    They have always taught languages in school - they're not likely to stop now. They could take the oppurtunity to teach Esperanto.
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    36% of 18~24 year olds is a pretty awful turnout for an issue of such magnitude that the eligible voting youth (apparently) feel so strongly about.

    It's almost as if most could care less, while at least at the 25~34yo age bracket it was better at just over half turning up (58%).

    While the majority of these two age brackets were large pro remain, sizeable minorities of them (24% and 39% respectively) were for Brexit.

    If we take the grand view the vast bulk of British youth between 18~34 could have given less of a **** about the EU, at least enough to vote on the matter.

    I'd say the youth didn't vote. Especially because if they had, and if the age-bracket's voting split had remained (with the majority for remain) they could have negated the much feared "grey vote".

    One thing I have taken a massive dislike to in the EU ref and aftermath is this tired meme that "the old stole our future!". No. voter engagement is a good thing and older voters are very active with their franchise.

    Apathetic youth "stole it" if we assume that vocal remainers represent the very strong and sincere pro-remain feelings of some super-majority of young people, that still couldn't bring it's voting power to the ballot box when it mattered.
    Let's be honest - I had no idea pre-referendum that many people really cared that much about the EU. Not about Europe or multiculturalism - but about the EU. It was only around the time of the vote, and result, that so many noisy people came out of the woodwork screaming about racism and loss of future.
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    36% of 18~24 year olds is a pretty awful turnout for an issue of such magnitude that the eligible voting youth (apparently) feel so strongly about.
    64%

    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/...-twice-as-high
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Without grammar, you cannot hope to say a basic sentence in a language, let alone master it.
    Come off it. How many hundreds of thousands of people in this country get by in English without having had a day's formal tuition in it?

    "Went the day well?" is a perfectly intelligible question.

    Millions of people learnt something of a foreign language in the first 75 years of the last century following the guns.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Come off it. How many hundreds of thousands of people in this country get by in English without having had a day's formal tuition in it?

    "Went the day well?" is a perfectly intelligible question.

    Millions of people learnt something of a foreign language in the first 75 years of the last century following the guns.
    By immersion from a young age.

    Without grammar, language cannot function.

    CBA with this anymore. I'm gonna leave this thread. People in this country just don't care for education or improving themselves or their prospects
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    Replace with more valuable languages such as Mandarin.
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    Are you for real or is this some sort of a bloody wind up? Still this Tory government is a ****ing joke in dealing with things like education, especially Justine Greening's predecessors. I'd give Greening more time before I come to conclusions.
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    Interesting but I think you're giving that more weight than it deserves.

    The Guardian article (pro-Remain bias) provided no link to the Opinium information on this, so I had to seek it out myself, and Opinium themselves provided no useful data in their own site's article on the results.

    From what I could gather it's just more of the same internet self-selecting polling which has proven time and time again to be wide of the mark (after all had it been reliable Remain wouldn't have got such an ugly surprise), and from my reading of their article on the Opinium page they already had a pre-conceived result.
    A poll from a biased source is thus has next to little value.

    Polls have one big flaw, which is people engaged with the topic being questioned will be motivated to respond. In internet polls people with a bias seek them out, skewing results away from any viable impartial cross-section. Again a factor which must be taken into serious consideration when assessing a private online poll.


    We do know however that young eligible voters have a poor track record of turning out, much less registering to vote.

    Still, for the sake of some clarity I went looking, the best I could find for 18~24 numbers was 6.8 million, and about three quarters are registered. Interesting.

    So we have 5.1 million to play with.

    If we believe 64% of those turned out as claimed that leaves us with a little over 3.25 million.
    If 73% of those voted Remain that's about 2.4 million.

    Granted I'm not the best at math but the original premise still stands, which is the majority of 18~24 year olds didn't vote Remain.

    While we can't rely on these internet polls (even ones that cite much lower youth turnout) as hard fact, we can assess voter turnout and notice an obvious trend in high youth voter areas returning low turnout, if we can take the BBC's data as reliable.

    Either by voting Leave, not turning up to the polling station, or just not bothering to register to begin with, the "Remain" generation still "stole their own future".

    Again, someone, anyone exercising their franchise is without reproach a good thing.
    The facts remain the same: The older generations are by and large more willing to exercise their democratic right to vote than younger, and the younger people have themselves to blame.
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    Interesting but I think you're giving that more weight than it deserves.

    The Guardian article (pro-Remain bias) provided no link to the Opinium information on this, so I had to seek it out myself, and Opinium themselves provided no useful data in their own site's article on the results.
    The 36% you quoted was from Sky and they said it was likely to be inaccurate. The 64% is from a study by Opinium AND LSE.

    http://ourinsight.opinium.co.uk/surv...-eu-referendum
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    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    I've just heard on local radio that some secondary schools in England and Wales are to gradually cease the teaching of foreign languages like French, German and Spanish, because with leaving the EU fewer people will be able to work or live in the EU after leaving school.

    They said that "the teaching of French and German in comprehensive schools only took off when Britain joined the EEC in the 1970s, before then only public schools taught languages. Spanish wasn't taken up until the mid 1980s when Spain joined the EU". Many young people will no longer consider living or working in mainland Europe post Brexit and Education budgets would be better spent on more useful teaching.
    Language teachers will be given free retraining in other subjects such as Maths or Science".

    I think this is a rotten shame to deny children the chance to learn a language. I learned French at school from aged 10 and really enjoyed it. Its so sad that we are becoming a little inward looking England cutting our ties from the outside world.

    What lessons are they going to replace languages with? And what if language teachers don't want to be retrained to teach other subjects? After all teaching languages was their passion.
    I think this phasing out was a trend that will most likely stop now due to languages becoming mandatory at GCSE. They will need to start increasing funding in languages because it is now mandatory to take a language at GCSE from the 2015 intake of year 7s. This is what my German teacher said to me because our school has made cuts to the languages department in recent years and now the department is expected to receive a massive spending boost.
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    (Original post by littlenorthernlass)
    Wonderful news. I never felt like being able to say in French what stationery I had in my pencil case was of any use.

    They've recently changed the curriculum to include more actual French that you would use and there's now tests where you have to have a spontaneous conversation with your teacher. Well, at least for AQA languages as my A Level German teacher was telling me about it
 
 
 
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