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What's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels? Watch

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    Constantly make sure you understand things, I mean after every lesson, and revise early (not a few weeks before!!!!) Also, mock/past papers are your friends. Treat mocks like real exams, revising for them helps the outcome in August.
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    1) Don't rely on one textbook for all the content and knowledge, skim through revision guides and teacher's power points (if made available). This way you don't miss anything out.

    2) Complete all past papers (especially for Chemistry and Biology) and mark them. Then go through the questions you got wrong with your teacher and make flashcards out of them. This is extremely helpful as many questions are repeated and it allows you to memorize the mark scheme.

    3) For essay-based subjects, practice writing under timed/exam conditions. This will greatly improve your time management.

    4) If you end up talking to your friends and get distracted a lot during free periods, spend them alone. You'll get more work done and feel better at the end.
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    You're mostly being tested on your memory of material and how you order words in an essay so don't pick a subject just because you were good at it at GCSE.
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    Make sure you understand all the information you are taught during your lessons (ask questions, do further reading etc)....DO NOT leave it until exam season to go over everything you need to know and then realise you know nothing about your subject :dontknow:
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    Find a really good magazine or journal to do with your subject that you can read for enjoyment.
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    (Original post by VioletPhillippo)
    Find a really good magazine or journal to do with your subject that you can read for enjoyment.
    On this note the Journal of Chemical Education explains basic topics really well, and is much more understandable than just research papers.
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    (Original post by Captivated)
    You're mostly being tested on your memory of material and how you order words in an essay so don't pick a subject just because you were good at it at GCSE.
    This sounds exactly like gcse lol
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    A levels- One of the years in a student's life where they learn the importance of INDEPENDENT REVISION!:work:

    So here are some tips for those starting A levels:

    1) Remember your HEALTH is Important- Many students become quite stressed during the the first term of A levels, and Its okay to stress but too much stress is not good for your health. It can prevent you from concentrating properly, feel tired and get ill quite easily. (Because immune system is weak). So the biggest tip is to make sure you look after you health. If you feel the need to discuss how stressed you are or if there is something bothering you in regards to your studies or even personal issues- make sure you discuss it with a friend, teacher or an adult.

    2) Keep a diary/ Notebook- This will allow you to keep track of homework/assignments/projects/exams e.t.c . Whenever you are assigned anything such as writing an essay or reading 2 pages of a book for the next lesson, write it down and tick it off once you've completed the task. Make sure you stick to the method of actually completing homework or any tasks that are given to you. This will prevent procrastination and create an routine for completing work on time.

    3)Make notes clear- Its nice sometimes to have notes that look amazing in bubble writing or having a poster covered with colorful annotations but make sure when you take notes, that's is clear and easy to understand. Make sure that after each lesson you go over your notes and create revision material such as spider diagrams or cards reducing the topic down only to the important facts that are needed. By making revision material and breaking down material along the way while studying, it will save time when it comes to exams and also reinforce material.

    4) Minimize distractions- This is definitely a questionable point but distractions are one of the things that tend to cause procrastination, a lack of studying, and a fall in grades. Organise social time and revision time and keep them separate. Sometimes its fun to study with friends but make sure your study buddies help you complete your work rather than talk and gossip. Do make sure you treat yourself to some free time, such as going out. If for example you are likely to procrastinate by going on the computer- put it away or give it to a family member to keep until you've done your work. One of the best ways to prevent distractions is to create an environment where there are no electronics. A timetable is also another example to prevent procrastination and getting distracted- create something flexible with realistic study and break periods. i.e studying 4/5 hrs a day is more realistic in chunks than all morning and all evening. 45 Minute chunks are a good example- and also remember people concentration times are different- work to a certain amount of time that you're capable of.

    5)Stay Organized - One of the most simple things- yes staying organised will create less stress and help you stay on top of work.

    6) Try not to compare and dont overthink the situation- Comparing is one of the things all of us do, but in terms of A levels, its not the best thing to do. Although we may be competitive, comparing your self- will lower your self esteem and make A level's overall had. Remember, we all study and learn at a different pace, so if someone understand biology better than you- leave it. Work at your own pace and everything will settle in. There will always be someone out there that is always achieving higher than you but never forget you are in the same boat as everyone else. Once you're settled into the college/sixth form, things will slowly fall in place. And even if something does not make sense the first time, it will later.

    7) Practice past papers/ Questions/esaays- Practice is the key to achieving those grades, make sure once you've covered a topic you attempt past papers, question- this is a great technique for all topics especially for biology/ chemistry and maths. Create small plans for essay based questions and attempt essays questions in times conditions-.And youtube is also a great way to reinforce material - there are alot of youtube vidoes such as khan academy that cover a wide range of subjects.

    And lastly enjoy the best years of A levels, 2 yrs fly by really quick and yes A levels are tough but it's also the year where you grow up to be an amazing adult with lots of opportunities so do make sure to take pictures to make the most of your memories. Good Luck to those starting A levels. - Sorry if this is alot to read.
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    Always re-read the question and do lots of little amounts of studying throughout the year rather than one huge lot at the end of the year, and dont forget to ask Questions! The only silly question is the one that hasn't been asked.
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    Do your own thing.

    You are unique. You can get a 100 different people telling you this work that works, but in the end you have to find your own way to learn and study. So listen to people, try different things, but find your own mix, what's right for you, and go with that.
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    REVISE FROM DAY ONE. Nuff said.
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    Put in the work, achieve the results.

    Simple


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    Do what you know you love. It's the only way to achieve at a high level, the more you enjoy it and do it for yourself, the more time you give and the better the outcome. Do what your good at and you shall shine your way through
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    I would say try to keep on top of your notes and start writing revision notes as you go along so that near exam time you have time to do as many past papers as possible.
    Make sure the subjects you have chosen are subjects that interest you otherwise when the challenging stuff sets in, you will struggle to stay motivated!
    If you have coursework, keep writing notes and revising the exam material alongside it (don't stop for the coursework) so that you don't fall behind and usually it will refresh your mind about the coursework topic as well (sciences usually).
    Don't be afraid to ask for help - ask teachers, get a tutor, don't just think 'oh it won't come up anyway' because it will be Sod's law it does.
    Revise both AS and A2 material for the A2 exams as I have learned the hard way that examiners can throw in whatever they want from both syllabuses into the A2 exams!
    Good luck
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    Be nice to your teachers and don't bad mouth them; they are there to supportive, helpful and caring when it come to your work and grades. If they are being unreasonable or horrible, complain to the head of the subject and get moved to another classroom; neither you nor them should be abused.

    Do your homework, it's there to tell you...TELL YOU where you strength and weaknesses are, NOT the teacher, yeah the teacher was to see and mark it. But it's mainly for you as guidance, if you're stuck in a certain area IT SHOWING that you have a weak spot where you need to study/revise.

    Study/Revise as early as possible. The earlier you study and revise on your content/weaknesses, the more likely you're going to pass your exams, yeah A-Levels/AS are a memory game, but you also have to understand what your studying and learning, so that if your asked to elaborate, you know that you can.

    (Aimed at GCSE students moving to A-Levels)

    Take responsibility. If you don't do the work, the homework, study or revise when your results come up on results day/mock exam papers take responsibility. The difference between colly and secondary school is that the teacher will not hunt up down, be fussed if you don't study/do homework and more. So if the grades are not what you want, then take responsibility of that.

    Pick subjects that you will love/need for your uni course. Do thorough research on the uni subjects that you might want to do. If you don't know what you want to at uni, pick subjects that you will interested in or liked at GCSE. You will be doing this for two years and it will require a not of attention and concentration, so pick something where you will love to study/revise and do work for.

    Uni Applications:

    Do your Personal statement as early as possible, so that you can do as many drafts as possible so that you can perfect it as much as possible, till you send it off. Your selling yourself to the Univeristy so don't take it lightly.
    Be honest and do a lot of research on the course/uni that you are looking at; you will need a valid reason to convince the unis why you want to do there and why you want to study that course.

    Last but not least GOOD LUCK!!
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    Read, read and read some more. Go outside of the specs and syllabi to ensure a wider understanding of the subject, that'll be what stands you head and shoulders above the rest when it comes to University Interviews!
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4197729
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    For Maths and Further maths just revise from the start and make sure you get everything. Don't rush to past papers. madasmaths.com has great mock past papers for C1-C4. In the end it's really easy to get an A/A* in maths, if you revise enough and get the problem solving down to a systematic process you will be good. Of course, some questions may come up that will require ingenuity, that's why I would also recommend trying AQA or CIE maths A level papers, just attempt, don't focus on them.
    For Literature I will just say read and memorise as much as possible. Make sure you can follow what you write and PLAN your essays. Don't neglect the fluidity and cohesion in essays, the ideas and quotes that you put in are way more effective if they are clearly presented. Go to your teachers for feedback.
    For French it's safe to say that practice makes perfect. Personally I found the speaking really daunting and I would say that's where easy marks can be picked up simply by speaking mediocre but correct French. Write essays, lots of them, make mistakes and get them corrected. Read some French news, France 24 is a free news channel which has an App. If you take French to a high level (DALF) then France 24 is a must every day, in addition to RFI.
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    I've finished AS but here's some advice I'd like to give from what I've experienced.

    Do all of your homework. Even if your teacher doesn't check it, it's worth doing it as it'll help you remember and apply what you've learnt in class. Plus, if there's any areas where you don't know the answer, you'll have time to ask your teacher for advice.
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    For Maths A Level, I'd advise doing every single one of the questions in the textbook. It seems daunting, but it'll give you good practice so that the concepts don't escape your head.
 
 
 
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