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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    The issue I see is middle class parents generally have the means and desire to pay for tutoring for their kids to pass the exams and get into a grammar school (even if some of them, in reality may not have passed originally). Meanwhile poorer students fail the exam and get shafted, some of which may have potential but just don't have the means to get there.
    That's life. You win some and you lose some.

    As for this tutoring and rich kids argument - I got into grammar school without a tutor and without being rich. You know how my parents and I did it? They bought me cheap revision guides and helped me with ones I couldn't do. It's not all about money.
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    (Original post by AfcFob)
    For certain subjects I do take responsibility because I went into some GCSE's too relaxed however for some subjects I was being taught by teachers that were not even qualified to teach the subject, so my school didn't help me at all since they were understaffed in some areas

    I still achieved well over my DfE targets but I still know I could've done better
    Unqualified teachers are not allowed in comprehensive schools. All that means is that schools should be better funded and regulated.


    I thrived in a streamed school where the best were pushed while the others were given more support and had the motivation of going up a set.

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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Unqualified teachers are not allowed in comprehensive schools. All that means is that schools should be better funded and regulated.


    I thrived in a streamed school where the best were pushed while the others were given more support and had the motivation of going up a set.

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    The teachers were qualified to teach a certain subject but were being put on others too... My Geog teacher was also put on RE and Tech (he'd never done tech in his life)

    My school had the approach of that they would rather have everyone pass at C's than have me achieve my potential. 42% of my year got 5A*-C's and only 8 people achieved an A* in any subject (I was one of them)

    I still did better than my DfE targets and did okay because I got 1A* 8A's and 2B's but it was difficult to stay motivated when the teachers didn't seem bothered about anything and didn't know how to teach the subject
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    Wouldn't more grammar schools reduce the vicious competition for places? Those who missed out by a few marks in their 11+ will have more opportunities to get into a grammar school as the mark thresholds will theoretically be lower and if they had a bad day, they could take an entrance exam at another school.
    Yeah you are right about that.
    I guess for the most part this is a really good thing.

    But I just hope your average comprehensives don't get even worse, if more top students end up at these new grammars. Not every top student will go to a grammar but I guess you can't really help that.
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    Very happy indeed. Her premiership is off to a better start than expected.
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    (Original post by TiernanW)
    I don't know how to feel about this. I have been to both a secondary school and a grammar school, and they are both different environments. In my first school I didn't do as well as I could have, partially from teachers trying to bring students on Ds up to Cs, and because I ended up with the wrong crowd of people for a while.

    Ideally, all schools should be good schools and be able to support both weaker and academically capable students. In my old school I did not get my A* in GCSE Maths. Our teacher put us all in for the GCSE Maths exams in year 11 (year 10 for England), and I was the only person who achieved an A. My teacher had to bring everyone else's Bs-Es up to passes and I did not get taught the higher topics. I want to able to a place like Cambridge and I feel like this will have held me back a bit. It also stopped me from being able to study Further Maths at my new school, and I had to self-teach it because their entrance requirement was a B in Further Maths but I wasn't even offered the GCSE.

    Its definitely a tricky one. To be honest though, the 11-plus wasn't fair. I had absolutely no tutoring for the exam because we couldn't afford it, but my friends who got tutored got As, but yet my GCSE results turned out a lot better than their's. My fear is that people who can't afford tutoring or extra-curricula's will end up disadvantaged. As I said, ideally a school should be able to accommodate for both, but I do feel like because of my first secondary school I did not do as well as I could have.

    I have found though in my new school that some of the children actually think they're better than the kids in my old school, which is not right at all... I'm really mixed on the issue.
    in what way did they think they were better
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    Put it this way... One of the reasons I got interviewed at imperial and UCL for engineering was the fact that i was at a grammar school... The interviewer said this himself.

    Grammar schools are rare at the moment, only 1 or 2 in each borough in london. Now they are coming back I think its gonna reduce 'wow factor'.
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    (Original post by john1332123)
    in what way did they think they were better
    They talked about my secondary school as if the kids there were all stupid, which isn't right.
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    Grammar Schools push kids further as they are in an environment with other clever children.
    If they were in a state school, chances are that they accustom themselves to lower standards.
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    I go to a grammar school but I’m not sure tbh. Went from supporting them to opposing them to idk.
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    Excellent.

    And do you know UKIP has been supporting grammar schools this whole time? Another victory.
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    (Original post by nwmyname)
    Grammar Schools push kids further as they are in an environment with other clever children.
    If they were in a state school, chances are that they accustom themselves to lower standards.
    At my grammar school we were constantly reminded that we were the 'top 10%' of intelligence in the area and I feel like that really helped me to hold myself to a higher standard of work. I think I'd be a completely different person if I didn't go to a grammar school.
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    (Original post by Hamo2509)
    At my grammar school we were constantly reminded that we were the 'top 10%' of intelligence in the area and I feel like that really helped me to hold myself to a higher standard of work. I think I'd be a completely different person if I didn't go to a grammar school.

    Totally agree.
    They reminded us of how privileged me and you were to get to such a school and constantly reminded us of what failure would be like in an attempt to push us further.
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    I understand the appeal but I don't agree with opening more grammar schools. The main reason for this is that the whole reason that grammar schools started in the first place was based on psychological research that turned out to be corrupt. We based a whole schooling system on false evidence
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    Great stuff. Hopefully we'll see more of this real conservatism from Theresa May.
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    (Original post by Morgii)
    I understand the appeal but I don't agree with opening more grammar schools. The main reason for this is that the whole reason that grammar schools started in the first place was based on psychological research that turned out to be corrupt. We based a whole schooling system on false evidence
    Grammar schools also entice more teachers to qualify and come into the profession.

    Imagine if you wanted to be a teacher. Would you teach a standard comprehensive school or a high achieving grammar school in your area, knowing that the government is going to pump more money into the grammar school system under Theresa May.
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    (Original post by AfcFob)
    The teachers were qualified to teach a certain subject but were being put on others too... My Geog teacher was also put on RE and Tech (he'd never done tech in his life)

    My school had the approach of that they would rather have everyone pass at C's than have me achieve my potential. 42% of my year got 5A*-C's and only 8 people achieved an A* in any subject (I was one of them)

    I still did better than my DfE targets and did okay because I got 1A* 8A's and 2B's but it was difficult to stay motivated when the teachers didn't seem bothered about anything and didn't know how to teach the subject
    I'm afraid you're pointing the finger at the wrong people. These ridiculous targets that force teachers into this position are imposed by the government.
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    If there were more free grammar schools parents would have to not sacrifice their lives to pay for private education. I would have loved some grammar school fun in secondary
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    While I fully support streaming kids based on ability in particular subjects, I'm not sure that having tiers of schools makes sense. Most kids have specific subjects they're better and worse at, and students who have a particular strength in one or two subjects shouldn't be barred from access to teachers (and classmates) of an appropriate calibre in those subjects. Otherwise, we're consigning valuable people to second rate education based on their performance in subjects which will likely be irrelevant to their chosen field.
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    I think grammar schools are great for the students in them, but I would be concerned for the students that aren't.*I think it would be bad for the average student if they were left with students who were constantly disruptive while the best students left to go elsewhere. *I know how difficult teachers found it to teach my high school class because of students that just didn't care.
 
 
 
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