Turn on thread page Beta

Why are American Students superior? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I find this discussion quite interesting, especially the contributions of the indian dude. I never met any Indians until I came to the UK, now I've met too many Seriously though, there is a cultural abyss between a country like India and the Uk. This country is beyond the "point of no return" in terms of immigration, I'm from Italy and I think we're headed the same way.
    What is worse is that there is little to be done at this point, it;s historically inevitable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by aureliotiziano)
    I find this discussion quite interesting, especially the contributions of the indian dude. I never met any Indians until I came to the UK, now I've met too many Seriously though, there is a cultural abyss between a country like India and the Uk. This country is beyond the "point of no return" in terms of immigration, I'm from Italy and I think we're headed the same way.
    What is worse is that there is little to be done at this point, it;s historically inevitable.
    You're going to make a lot of friends on TSR with those kind of posts.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    To go back to your original question, I think it really has to do with the differences in the educational systems. In Canada in high school we were not provided with any extra marks for "participation" but it was fully expected that we participate and contribute to the classes and our teachers would deliberately challenge us. We were conditioned to speak up and state our opinion and/or challenge what was presented to us i.e. gather info and support our thoughts/statements/arguments. This was all pretty normal.

    In contrast at age 17 I went on a student exchange to Sydney Aus.(which I am told is based on the UK educational system) and grant it my sample size is small only 1 school but I found that the students in Australia NEVER spoke up in class (only if they were pointed at and asked a question and even then would sort of mumble the answer). They never ever questioned or challenged a teacher even if the teacher had for e.g. messed up a math problem and some of the students knew it! To top it off they had very strict rules in the school and their uniforms whereas our school rules were way more "relaxed". It felt like I had turned my watch back 50 years or something. I quickly learned to shut up. Asking intelligent questions in class was not the way to go.
    Offline

    13
    I'm guessing I wont fit in if I do apply to an American university. I'm pretty shy and I do feel very awkward when put on the spot. I do come out of my shell from time to time but only when I feel comfortable. I hardly ever spoke up in sixth form and this did cause some concern… but at the end of the course I achieved the highest grade. So I don't think you should be penalised for keeping quiet. Perhaps an American education will bring me out of my shell a little and boost my confidence? Either than or I'll end up leaving out of sheer embarrassment from eager, in-your-face Americans waiting for me to say something remotely intelligent… it's not that I don't know what to talk about - I just sometimes find it hard to say what I want to say out loud! How sad!!:rolleyes: I'm more of a listener although I do sometimes stop myself from speaking out.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laus)
    I'm guessing I wont fit in if I do apply to an American university. I'm pretty shy and I do feel very awkward when put on the spot. I do come out of my shell from time to time but only when I feel comfortable. I hardly ever spoke up in sixth form and this did cause some concern… but at the end of the course I achieved the highest grade. So I don't think you should be penalised for keeping quiet. Perhaps an American education will bring me out of my shell a little and boost my confidence? Either than or I'll end up leaving out of sheer embarrassment from eager, in-your-face Americans waiting for me to say something remotely intelligent… it's not that I don't know what to talk about - I just sometimes find it hard to say what I want to say out loud! How sad!!:rolleyes: I'm more of a listener although I do sometimes stop myself from speaking out.
    I don't think anybody would try to force you to speak or constantly put you on the spot in a US college. If you want to keep quiet I'm sure you're perfectly entitled to, you just won't score very highly on the participation part of your grade. In the US especially, there will be plenty of people in your classes who are willing to to steer the discussion if you don't feel comfortable doing that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Don't worry. I tend to be very shy and quiet in classes and i've always done well (and i'm american). some professors do require their students to participate. but if you ask them questions after class or go their office hours, they will usually count that as participation. they just want to make sure you're involved in the class.
    Offline

    13
    Thanks guys. I would do my best to contribute but I just don't want to feel uncomfortable or too out of place. I haven't even decided if I'm going to apply yet! Are US degrees more flexible i.e. do they let you pick and choose different subject areas?

    The Americans I have met have been lovelyjubly. I haven't met many though...!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    US degree programs are simultaneously flexible and inflexible. You can choose a lot of elective courses but oftentimes you can't choose which discipline their from (ie, you may have, say, a Social Sciences requirement, but within that there may be like ten courses to choose from). But oftentimes you can choose which discipline their from. In any event, they're more flexible than a UK degree. There'll probably be a lot of choice within your major as well.

    Oh, and by course I mean class/module.

    And don't worry about shyness. There are loads of shy people in America. In my high schools, for every outspoken person there were five-ten people who said much less. We only had a couple of classes where we talked a lot (and one of them had a couch in it); it was mostly dependent on the teacher. Sometimes the teachers would want to encourage discussion and sometimes they would just want to lecture and some of them were just crap and didn't really care. I think this applies to uni as well, but it's also dependent on class size and the type of class (ie, you aren't going to have a participation mark for a Maths class, unless it's some strange seminar or something).
    Offline

    13
    Thanks for the info and reassurance. You've put my mind at rest a little. The problem is, most of the subjects I'm interested in probably require some discussion (e.g. Philosophy, English, Writing, possibly an area of law etc!)... I probably do need to be a bit more outspoken but it's just a fear I have! I hate being put on the spot especially in front of people I don't know very well. I'm sure I'll grow out of it... although I thought I would have by this age! Are American Unis anything like you see in the movies? - that sort of atmosphere I mean?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Frankly, the fact that your thread title is a loaded questions does not speak well of the rest of the thread. How are you so sure that American students are superior?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laus)
    Are American Unis anything like you see in the movies? - that sort of atmosphere I mean?
    Which movies?

    Siddhartha, I think you need to read the thread. He wasn't asserting that American students were superior as the thread title suggests; it was just a bad choice of title.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Davetherave)
    You're going to make a lot of friends on TSR with those kind of posts.
    :confused: Why??

    Anyways, I think that what exists is a cultural gap in between the US and other European/Asian countries. The education format, lifestyle,etc are all quite different on the whole. I don't think that a difference has to be either positive or negative:its just a difference. If Americans think fit to be more vocal about their subjects than Europeans than that's how they prefer it to be . There isn't any hard and fast rule about what is best IMO. At the end of the day its how much you have benefited that matters and different people benefit in different terms.

    To the OP, just edit your title to kill all confusion and debate .

    :tee:
    Offline

    13
    There is a cultural gap between most countries... probably because we are from different cultures! It's called diversity! How dull would the world be if we didn't have a variety of cultures/temperaments/learning styles etc. to relate to and learn from. To understand each other we just have to be willing to listen, more inclusive and open-minded. I think Americans are more vocal about their subjects because that's the way they've been taught... Some Brits are taught that way too. It depends what sort of school you go to.

    RE movies: movies where 'geeks' get bullied and certain types of people take over! I know American universities are probably nothing like that and the people that go are (hopefully) more mature... lol... it was a bit of a silly question really! I just have cheerleader type flicks ingrained in my psyche!...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by aureliotiziano)
    I never met any Indians until I came to the UK, now I've met too many Seriously though, there is a cultural abyss between a country like India and the Uk. This country is beyond the "point of no return" in terms of immigration, I'm from Italy and I think we're headed the same way.
    What is worse is that there is little to be done at this point, it;s historically inevitable.
    I think you may have mistaken Indians for our not so friendly neighbours, who are very different. Crime rates and unemployment amoung NRI's (non resident indians) are very low in their adopted countries, unlike immigrants from neighbouring countries. indians are an asset to London and are the wealthiest ethnic group in the USA, and one of the most wealthiest ethnis group in the UK. Indians economic contribution to the west will be similar to the Jewish contribution in years to come. NRI's have nothing to do with international terrorism, which i think you are trying to imply, majority of Indians follow a completely different religion. India has had a problem from invaders from the middle east for centuries. And the supression of indeginous religions by the Mughals.
    Here a nice article.
    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...markets/india/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mpat)
    I think you may have mistaken Indians for our not so friendly neighbours, who are very different. Crime rates and unemployment amoung NRI's (non resident indians) are very low in their adopted countries, unlike immigrants from neighbouring countries. indians are an asset to London and are the wealthiest ethnic group in the USA, and one of the most wealthiest ethnis group in the UK. Indians economic contribution to the west will be similar to the Jewish contribution in years to come. NRI's have nothing to do with international terrorism, which i think you are trying to imply, majority of Indians follow a completely different religion. India has had a problem from invaders from the middle east for centuries. And the supression of indeginous religions by the Mughals.
    Here a nice article.
    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...markets/india/
    Exactly, I could not do without Apu in the Simpsons.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    most indians are not even insulted at 'Apu' stereotpes, we do not like victim culture. I do understand aureliotiziano anxiety, provided he is talking about about indias neighbours. im not going to make generalisations but all statistics on young people of middle eastern/pakistani/bangladeshi origins point to a slippery slope. there seems to be over the top appeasement, terrorist plots every summer is a serious problem, doctors ffs. and only 40years in prison where there is an opportunity to radicalise vulnerable people, the terrorists dream.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mpat)
    most indians are not even insulted at 'Apu' stereotpes, we do not like victim culture. I do understand aureliotiziano anxiety, provided he is talking about about indias neighbours. im not going to make generalisations but all statistics on young people of middle eastern/pakistani/bangladeshi origins point to a slippery slope. there seems to be over the top appeasement, terrorist plots every summer is a serious problem, doctors ffs. and only 40years in prison where there is an opportunity to radicalise vulnerable people, the terrorists dream.
    Uh the current failed bomb attacks in glasgow was also partly plotted by an indian who was arrested, one of the worlds greatest mafia dons responsible for serious bomb attacks is from your country!!!!:p: Really though I don't think anyone is attacking your country or questioning its virtue. We all know india is a great country with a brialliant future but please resorting to attacking its neighbouring countries and europe and america to prove to others india's value is just plain wrong. Every country has its plus and minus; there is no perfect country that exists. I think your being a bit unfair on the OP. He did not mean that Americans are superior; he just used the wrong statement to describe his post because nowhere in this thread I think has anyone mentioned that Americans are superior. Like I said before every country is culturally different and being different does not mean right or wrong it just means being different.

    :tee:
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Warrior King)
    Well say a crazed gunman burst into my house and said to me "I'll shoot you if you're a caste below a Brahmin (the highest caste)". If I cna prove to him that I am infact a Brahmin, my life would be spared and said gunman would probably seek his victim elsewhere.

    You see the caste system still exists in India/Hindu culture desptie the fact it is outlawed. Nine times out of ten it is rooted to the rural/backwater areas of India but I would be lying if I said that "city dwellers" didn't dabble in a bit of caste discrimination every now and again.

    Discrimination of some kind whether it's racial, religious, height, weight, etc. exists in every society. None of you here can say that discrimination is non-existent in the Western World (USA, UK, Europe, etc.). Despite the fact that it has been independent for 60 years, India is still a young coutnry and still very much finding its feet in the world. It takes time to eradicate old stereotypes and prejudices from a population of 1 billion people with a varying degree of age groups.

    I think that should be kept in mind when launch a scathing attack on Indian culture (especially those who know absolutely nothing about said culture).

    Aiight. I am not trying to attack you all. But just hear me out.
    I live in India, the capitol - NEW DELHI. Noone has ever burst into my house and said that. The 2% of the population I 'dabble' with (which is the population which is significantly well off and respected) has remenants of this cast system you talk about. And you are correct to say it takes a long time to remove sterotypes. But thats only because our grandfathers, grandmothers etc. have this ideal ingrained into their thought processes. Anyone born after for examples sake 1957 would not look upon the cast system as anything significant. But this is the 2% of the population i live within. With regard to the rural villages, and the countless shanty towns in the city- with regard to the working class, those who work illegally as servants, drivers, maids those who live below the poverty line, they will still to an extent believe this cast system works due to the bleek future they believe they have which they'd like to blame on this system because they cannot climb the ladder. And this is not a minority, this is the MAJORITY of the country. India has alot of faults as I see it. Not just cast systems, but with regard to corruption at every level.

    I am fortunate not to be stuck in that vicious cycle, but i hate it when people generalize like they do (not you).

    And to correct you Bhramins and Pundits are the highest class levels.

    I appreciate your clarifications though. It would do good for people to open their eyes a bit, and not just regard what discovery channel shows as India - as the true India.

    But this thread has nothing to do with this.

    As far as my experience is, I used to go to the British school in New Delhi, the American school was right across the road. Both with our parallel systems. The Americans in that school of which a majority- were half asians/European and american and a significant number of pure americans. Theyre intellect did not differ, my experience was that the mixes (people with diff nationalities/ethnicitys) were more open-minded and knew more about what was really going on. The pure bred americans lived in their world of the comissary- and the embassy- (which for them was across the street too).

    Intelligence wise, its stupid to say they are superior students. It becomes a matter of intrest. I believe that "exchange students" who put themselves out there and travel to england will be more proactive in class and increasingly more willing to disscuss, just like any other student who opts to exchange.

    I'm half indian, and french and when i did go to the british school the few americans that enrolled there who came from previous american schooling, rarely participated. And if they did, they were quickly shut up by either, me, the teacher or any other student in my class that knew something about the topic discussed. We were encouraged to disscuss topics even though we were doing GCSE'S & A-level courses. We were encouraged to debate.

    On the rare case there were a couple of teachers that were prepared to repremand any student for even asking a question, my experience was quite different, countering teachers whenever i got the chance. Im not American. And personally i believe that i was superior to most of the students in my class, not intelligence wise with regard to tests & exams but merely through my debating skills, and the ability to be analytical & observant constantly.

    Perhaps this is what Key skills american students are taught in excess in American colleges. As far as American students outside America- they are average and a lot of them are my friends, and a lot of them are excessively intelligent, but when it comes to carrying an intellectual conversation with regard to academia of sorts they rarely participate. And i find more of the 'mixes' (those half american and asian/european/african or whatever) to talk more and be able to contribute to the conversation.

    I suppose the question I want to ask, define this superiority apart from being more involved in class? That surely doesnt mean one is superior.
    I behaved as those americans students did in your classes (I didnt talk **** as much as you may believe otherwise), and I found that i was not superior and i find no reason to believe the americans especially college students are either.

    (Go ahead, rip me apart now. )

    (Original post by Anannya)
    Uh the current failed bomb attacks in glasgow was also partly plotted by an indian who was arrested, one of the worlds greatest mafia dons responsible for serious bomb attacks is from your country!!!!:p:
    Just because one extremist indian did that. I hope noone generalizes this behaviour towards population of the indian nation. Mafia dons exsist everywhere. India has a really bad case of this within the main cities. And your right otherwise, no country is perfect. + & -'S exsist everywhere. And your names quite indian btw.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kashmir.noir)
    Aiight. I am not trying to attack you all. But just hear me out.
    I live in India, the capitol - NEW DELHI. Noone has ever burst into my house and said that. The 2% of the population I 'dabble' with (which is the population which is significantly well off and respected) has remenants of this cast system you talk about. And you are correct to say it takes a long time to remove sterotypes. But thats only because our grandfathers, grandmothers etc. have this ideal ingrained into their thought processes. Anyone born after for examples sake 1957 would not look upon the cast system as anything significant. But this is the 2% of the population i live within. With regard to the rural villages, and the countless shanty towns in the city- with regard to the working class, those who work illegally as servants, drivers, maids those who live below the poverty line, they will still to an extent believe this cast system works due to the bleek future they believe they have which they'd like to blame on this system because they cannot climb the ladder. And this is not a minority, this is the MAJORITY of the country. India has alot of faults as I see it. Not just cast systems, but with regard to corruption at every level.

    I am fortunate not to be stuck in that vicious cycle, but i hate it when people generalize like they do (not you).

    And to correct you Bhramins and Pundits are the highest class levels.

    I appreciate your clarifications though. It would do good for people to open their eyes a bit, and not just regard what discovery channel shows as India - as the true India.

    But this thread has nothing to do with this.

    As far as my experience is, I used to go to the British school in New Delhi, the American school was right across the road. Both with our parallel systems. The Americans in that school of which a majority- were half asians/European and american and a significant number of pure americans. Theyre intellect did not differ, my experience was that the mixes (people with diff nationalities/ethnicitys) were more open-minded and knew more about what was really going on. The pure bred americans lived in their world of the comissary- and the embassy- (which for them was across the street too).

    Intelligence wise, its stupid to say they are superior students. It becomes a matter of intrest. I believe that "exchange students" who put themselves out there and travel to england will be more proactive in class and increasingly more willing to disscuss, just like any other student who opts to exchange.

    I'm half indian, and french and when i did go to the british school the few americans that enrolled there who came from previous american schooling, rarely participated. And if they did, they were quickly shut up by either, me, the teacher or any other student in my class that knew something about the topic discussed. We were encouraged to disscuss topics even though we were doing GCSE'S & A-level courses. We were encouraged to debate.

    On the rare case there were a couple of teachers that were prepared to repremand any student for even asking a question, my experience was quite different, countering teachers whenever i got the chance. Im not American. And personally i believe that i was superior to most of the students in my class, not intelligence wise with regard to tests & exams but merely through my debating skills, and the ability to be analytical & observant constantly.

    Perhaps this is what Key skills american students are taught in excess in American colleges. As far as American students outside America- they are average and a lot of them are my friends, and a lot of them are excessively intelligent, but when it comes to carrying an intellectual conversation with regard to academia of sorts they rarely participate. And i find more of the 'mixes' (those half american and asian/european/african or whatever) to talk more and be able to contribute to the conversation.

    I suppose the question I want to ask, define this superiority apart from being more involved in class? That surely doesnt mean one is superior.
    I behaved as those americans students did in your classes (I didnt talk **** as much as you may believe otherwise), and I found that i was not superior and i find no reason to believe the americans especially college students are either.

    (Go ahead, rip me apart now. )



    Just because one extremist indian did that. I hope noone generalizes this behaviour towards population of the indian nation. Mafia dons exsist everywhere. India has a really bad case of this within the main cities. And your right otherwise, no country is perfect. + & -'S exsist everywhere. And your names quite indian btw.
    ^o) What does that have to do with anything?I wasn't generalising I was just merely pointing out that india has its fair share of troubles as well just like any country and because of that its wrong to attack other nations stating that this is wrong there and that country has this faults and using them to justify your country is better when your own has its unique sets of problems as well. If you think one indian should not be used to generalise (which I don't think either) then no one in their right mind would think that most muslims are potential bomb-throwers or europeans are snobs and americans are superior but mpat did say something like that. I really don't want to start a debate and this is a very off-topic considering the thread isn't so I don't think its wise to continue posting about such things here. No one is superior to anyone geez. What's with this superiority complex existing here....where the heck do you people find anyone mentioning that Americans are superior....it was a wrong title for a thread that was not subjective to it.Guys, all of you chill. It was a mere topic that has turned into a volatile debate abot something totally irrelevant to the thread.:rolleyes:

    :tee:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This is a ridiculous conversation. This is the 21st century. Can't we just all agree that every country has problems, and that no one should either overgeneralize about another country of overglorify their own?
 
 
 
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.