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Do I need Maths for A-Level Chemsitry? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Is A-Level Maths important for A-Level Chemistry?
    It helps a lot
    24
    31.58%
    It helps a small amount
    36
    47.37%
    It isn't really necessary at all
    16
    21.05%

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    (Original post by Lainathiel)
    Bs I think, but the question I was referring to only meant they lost a few marks. My point was, as with many other commenters on here, is that maths would help you to understand the concepts; however, if you wouldn't enjoy maths then it would be much more worthwhile for you to take another subject, and just make sure that you take the time to thoroughly learn the principles behind whatever you're doing maths-wise in chemistry, rather than just learning it by rote.
    So you think I'll be capable of learning these concepts without maths? How many actually are there, I mean is chemistry literally full of them


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    (Original post by solC)
    I took the Edexcel new spec AS chemistry this year, and from the start I noticed that the new spec definitely contained more maths than the old spec. However in terms of difficulty, there's no complex maths involved (in AS at least) but the calculation questions do often require you to understand WHY you are doing the things you do.
    e.g. there were quite a few long calculation questions during my exams this year (5/6 markers) and they were nothing more than simple multiplication/division etc but on one of them I remember getting confused as to what i was actually trying to find.

    Either way i really enjoyed chemistry and I would defo recommend you take it regardless of what the maths is like (there was one person in my class who didnt do maths A level, she was fine throughout the year). Good luck

    P.S the maths at A2 does have some things seen during A level maths, but its nothing too hard (logarithms, v. interesting ) and wont take much time to learn.
    Might be unrelated, but how hard is maths to get an A in (AS) if I'm not naturally maths minded?

    I got an A* at GCSE but I only scraped it so an A is probably a better representation


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    The maths in Chemistry is not hard, especially if you practice it a lot.
    I got a B in GCSE maths, didn't take A level maths as I'm not gifted in maths but ended with an A in Chemistry a level.
    You really don't need A level maths for A level Chemistry. However, if it's something you want to do at University, I would suggest taking A level maths.
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    The maths in Chemistry is not hard, especially if you practice it a lot.
    I got a B in GCSE maths, didn't take A level maths as I'm not gifted in maths but ended with an A in Chemistry a level.
    You really don't need A level maths for A level Chemistry. However, if it's something you want to do at University, I would suggest taking A level maths.
    So did you you struggle with the maths at all?


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    (Original post by james Thompson56)
    You talking about Kc the equilibrium constant?
    They are both equilibrium constants...
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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    So did you you struggle with the maths at all?


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    No, I did find it difficult at times but no more than the people who were doing A level maths. There were actually some people who did A level Maths and got Cs at the end of the A level so you really don't need it. As long as you are willing to work hard and practice, you can still get the highest grades.
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    (Original post by AqsaMx)
    No, I did find it difficult at times but no more than the people who were doing A level maths. There were actually some people who did A level Maths and got Cs at the end of the A level so you really don't need it. As long as you are willing to work hard and practice, you can still get the highest grades.
    When did you study it? Just because there's been reforms recently, so the more recent the better


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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    Might be unrelated, but how hard is maths to get an A in (AS) if I'm not naturally maths minded?

    I got an A* at GCSE but I only scraped it so an A is probably a better representation


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    I think that as long as you enjoy maths and are willing to put the practise in, maths A level can become quite easy. I don't think you need to be a natural to get an A at all. If you want to see how it is like difficulty wise i would advise looking at some c1 papers.
    I would perhaps ask your teachers about the topics learnt at AS to see if you will enjoy them or even look at the specification on the Edexcel website.

    Feel free to ask any more questions about maths
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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    Might be unrelated, but how hard is maths to get an A in (AS) if I'm not naturally maths minded?

    I got an A* at GCSE but I only scraped it so an A is probably a better representation


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    It doesn't really matter if you get a high grade in GCSE. I know a few people who got A* in GCSE but ended up with a B in AS because they didn't put the work in. I was unfortunate in that I was 1UMS off an A* in GCSE but I brought that around in AS and got a high A, due to my work ethic
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    I would advise you to take A level or at least AS if you are going to do A level chemistry, as ther eis a lot of maths, especially in A2. It depends on people as I really like maths so I'm doing it at A level. Maths has really helped me with chemistry (I got A's in both this year) and I have friends who really struggled with chemistry because they didn't take maths. So my recommendation would be take maths and see what happens and if you are really struggling with it drop it after a month or so. Good Luck!
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    Definitely take maths! The two subjects are so interlinked. Tbh if you're thinking of not taking maths cus ur bad at it or don't like it then u really shouldn't be taking chemistry.
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Definitely take maths! The two subjects are so interlinked. Tbh if you're thinking of not taking maths cus ur bad at it or don't like it then u really shouldn't be taking chemistry.
    It's only when maths becomes really complex (A-Level) that I don't enjoy it

    So I'm hoping the maths in chemistry isn't massively complex, because I'd be fine with that


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    (Original post by mithi98)
    I would advise you to take A level or at least AS if you are going to do A level chemistry, as ther eis a lot of maths, especially in A2. It depends on people as I really like maths so I'm doing it at A level. Maths has really helped me with chemistry (I got A's in both this year) and I have friends who really struggled with chemistry because they didn't take maths. So my recommendation would be take maths and see what happens and if you are really struggling with it drop it after a month or so. Good Luck!
    How did it help though? I don't see how 99% of the A-Level maths course is relevant for chemistry and how it would help much anyway?

    Maybe it just keeps maths fresh in your mind and keeps you sharp, i don't know

    I'd just rather do a subject I'm way more interested in (and probably get a better grade in) but if I'm really going to struggle to cope with chemistry without knowing the content at a-level maths then I guess I don't really have much choice


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    I haven't started my a levels yet, I'm starting in September as well, so maybe my opinion isn't the best but here's my advice ; only take subjects you enjoy, if you don't enjoy maths at GCSE I'm sure as hell you won't enjoy it at AS levels, don't do it because someone thinks you need to, prove them wrong and that you don't need to (: just put in the extra effort and I'm sure it won't be too bad, what UMS did you get in the further chemistry exam because that's suppose to be more like chemistry at a level?


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    (Original post by blueribbons99)
    I haven't started my a levels yet, I'm starting in September as well, so maybe my opinion isn't the best but here's my advice ; only take subjects you enjoy, if you don't enjoy maths at GCSE I'm sure as hell you won't enjoy it at AS levels, don't do it because someone thinks you need to, prove them wrong and that you don't need to (: just put in the extra effort and I'm sure it won't be too bad, what UMS did you get in the further chemistry exam because that's suppose to be more like chemistry at a level?


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    Also adding on to this like someone said above, maths is a requirement if you are going to take pretty much any of the sciences on for a degree, so consider what you want to study at uni, in September I'm studying chemistry, maths, biology and physics


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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    x
    *No, not really. But mathematics at A level would give you a better and deeper understanding for it as GCSE can do. And in stoichiometry, it is a great advantage to have this understanding.
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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    Which exam board? And did you get that this year?


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    OCR Salters B which I know has been discontinued but is known to contain a lot of maths! I got that grade this year

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    (Original post by TomSuffolk)
    When did you study it? Just because there's been reforms recently, so the more recent the better


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    I finished my A2s this year so very recent
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    (Original post by carolinehj)
    Definitely take maths! The two subjects are so interlinked. Tbh if you're thinking of not taking maths cus ur bad at it or don't like it then u really shouldn't be taking chemistry.
    Not exactly. Chemistry does not consist of mathematical aspect only. There are topics without it indeed. If students are better in them, it is worth consideration to take chemistry after all.
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    Could people do the poll please because I'm getting mixed opinions
 
 
 
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