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    (Original post by Made in the USA)
    What's wrong with South Carolina? Is it because, in South Carolina, Americans had their first decisive victory over the British in the Revolutionary War?
    I've been fortunate to enough to see SC on vacation. Charleston, South Carolina is one of the most beautiful and historic cities in the World. If you visit, make sure you try some of the local seafood selection. The food is really good in most of the restaurants.
    I haven't been to Louisiana, so I can't comment on it. What didn't you like about Louisiana when you stayed there? :rolleyes:
    I don't know anyone in Britain who is remotely bitter about the Revolutionary War... I suppose I can understand why it is such an American obsession. I think you can't deny that Americans to some extent are taught to be somewhat self-reflexive within the USA - American History is usually compulsory at schools while "wider" history is not. In the UK we make no distinction and History as a subject encompasses a much wider field than simply British History.

    Both the UK and the USA have their plus and minus points. Having spent long periods of time in both places, I have to say I prefer the UK. No offense to those Americans out there, but a lot of extremism comes out of the USA. All the burning of Harry Potter books/the KKK/the Rednecks

    And your president is possibly the most annoying individual ever to grace the planet. Not only is he horribly inarticulate ("all I know is these are BAD PEOPLE"....Wow, I'm speechless with admiration. Not.), but he also seems to take an almost absurd pleasure in manifesting his severe lack of brain cells(who could possiblty forget the pretzel incident). He certainly gives all Americans a bad name. Citizens need to use this next general election to get rid of him...whilst his primitive behaviour might provide us Brits with some mild entertainment, I really don't think it's in anybody's interests to have the world's biggest superpower run by possibly the most spectacularly imbecilic excuse-for-politician ever to land himself in the White House. I have to agree with Micheal Moore in 'Stupid White Men' (an excellent read...). Admittedly, Tony Blair isn't exactly the bees knees, but he has at least some semblance of competency.

    Also, American speech is remarkably straightforward. They tell it as it is, even when it's not a particularly good idea to do so. Linguistic subtlety, innuendo, and irony that other nations find delightful puzzle the Americans, who take all statements at face value, weigh them for accuracy, and reject anything they don't understand. Of course, this is a sweeping generalisation, and I apologise, but I've yet to see an American Comedy which ranks alongside Blackadder.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    I don't know anyone in Britain who is remotely bitter about the Revolutionary War... I suppose I can understand why it is such an American obsession. I think you can't deny that Americans to some extent are taught to be somewhat self-reflexive within the USA - American History is usually compulsory at schools while "wider" history is not. In the UK we make no distinction and History as a subject encompasses a much wider field than simply British History.
    In fact in Britian we do very little British history!
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    (Original post by firebladez777)
    Both the UK and the USA have their plus and minus points. Having spent long periods of time in both places, I have to say I prefer the UK. No offense to those Americans out there, but a lot of extremism comes out of the USA. All the burning of Harry Potter books/the KKK/the Rednecks

    And your president is possibly the most annoying individual ever to grace the planet. Not only is he horribly inarticulate ("all I know is these are BAD PEOPLE"....Wow, I'm speechless with admiration. Not.), but he also seems to take an almost absurd pleasure in manifesting his severe lack of brain cells(who could possiblty forget the pretzel incident). He certainly gives all Americans a bad name. Citizens need to use this next general election to get rid of him...whilst his primitive behaviour might provide us Brits with some mild entertainment, I really don't think it's in anybody's interests to have the world's biggest superpower run by possibly the most spectacularly imbecilic excuse-for-politician ever to land himself in the White House. I have to agree with Micheal Moore in 'Stupid White Men' (an excellent read...). Admittedly, Tony Blair isn't exactly the bees knees, but he has at least some semblance of competency.

    Also, American speech is remarkably straightforward. They tell it as it is, even when it's not a particularly good idea to do so. Linguistic subtlety, innuendo, and irony that other nations find delightful puzzle the Americans, who take all statements at face value, weigh them for accuracy, and reject anything they don't understand. Of course, this is a sweeping generalisation, and I apologise, but I've yet to see an American Comedy which ranks alongside Blackadder.
    nice to see we're all staying objective.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    In fact in Britian we do very little British history!
    i cant remember doing any. all that embarassing empire nonsense would be considered racist and guilty of inciting racial hatred in todays classroom. who needs to know about the most important and influential 3 centuries in British (and the anglophone world's) history anyway?

    (Original post by vienna95)
    nice to see we're all staying objective.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by vienna95)
    nice to see we're all staying objective.
    hehe i thought it was quite good
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    (Original post by vienna95)
    i cant remember doing any. all that embarassing empire nonsense would be considered racist and guilty of inciting racial hatred in todays classroom. who needs to know about the most important and influential 3 centuries in British (and the anglophone world's) history anyway?
    *ignores sarcasm* no one, good point well made
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    personally i've lived in both places and overall i prefer england..can't say why exactly, just something to do with the general ambiance. But in all honesty i think it's because i live in Surrey...i've been to other places and don't think i could stand to live there, some places are just so grotty and damp and depressing. I would far prefer to live in the clean, leafy and wealthier parts of England than anywhere in America.

    Having said that, i much prefered the attitudes of Americans. They are far less judgemental and exceedingly friendly. One really does feel as though 'anything is possible in the Land of Opportunity', if for no other reason than people are actually prepared to help you achieve your goals, whereas english society has a tendancy to discourage over achievement *massive generalisations*

    (Original post by grace)
    O lovely lily clean,O lily springing green, O lily bursting white, Dear lily of delight, Spring in my heart agen that I may flower to men."
    You spelled 'again' wrong
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    I think that America being alot larger does not need to look outward as much as the UK does. Personally I am glad that Britain is alot more secular. However someone will probably disagree. Given AT's definition of "best" the question still seems completely ludiricous to me as there are a wide range of experiences that people have in both America and the UK. I am sure someone living on benifits here in Britain would have a very different view to a sucessful business man on which is better. As Vienna said before the question is completely subjective and for alot of people seems to be just a chance to express their nationlistic views that goes with the england flags tied to cars.

    (Original post by grace)
    actually it's from a john masefield poem, and he spells it 'agen'.
    Oh. OK. Sorry. (Maybe Masefeld needs some spelling lessons)
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    something that made me laugh and is relevant to this thread...

    Scott Burgess tearing up that lunatic Polly Toynbee.
    http://dailyablution.blogs.com/the_d...toynbee_c.html


    "Polly Toynbee is at it again, relentlessly making up "facts" to support an argument which can be summarised as "Britain sucks because it's pro-American." Her latest piece, Delusions of grandeur, shows her in full cry, making the case that "If ever there was a time to persuade people our future is in Europe, it's now":

    "Average wages in western Europe are far higher than ours, their standard of living better, yet we brag about our brief recent economic growth while conveniently forgetting how far behind we remain. Won the war, lost the peace is still true."
    Polly must have missed the latest report from Eurostat (PDF), which states that "the MS [EU member states] with the highest level of earnings are Denmark and the United Kingdom."

    If we compare "Average gross annual earnings in industry and services of full-time employees in enterprises with 10 or more employees," we find that, of European countries, only Switzerland, Norway and Denmark have higher earning levels. Indeed, 2001 figures (the latest complete dataset) put UK earnings at 22% higher than the 15 nation EU average. "Far higher," one might even say.

    [comment]
    The three countries that beat the UK in the economically meaningful "average gross annual earnings in industry and services" table have some interesting attributes. In reverse order of their earning superiority over us:

    - Denmark also retained its own currency and so is not in the 'Eurozone'.

    - Norway is not in the European Union, but rather the European Free Trade Association. However, it entered into the wider 'Agreement on the European Economic Area' in 1994.

    - Switzerland sticks to being just a member of EFTA.

    http://www.efta.int/

    On that basis it seems that, for developed countries at least, staying ahead may be directly proportional to staying out of 'Europe'.

    Incidentally, Britain was a founder member of EFTA, but gave it up to engage in the political union. We left our "behind" in the past
    [/end comment]



    As far as the standard of living is concerned, Polly picked a bad day to make her assertion, as the widely publicised Human Development Index - an attempt to quantify quality of life - was released yesterday. Using indices of life expectancy, education, and standard of living, it ranks the UK as the 12th best country in the world in which to live - ahead of Finland, Austria, France, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Italy, Greece and Portugal.

    If we examine only the standard of living component (GDP Index), we find the UK tied with France, Italy, Finland and Polly's beloved Sweden, ahead of Spain, Greece and Portugal, and only one percentage point behind Belgium and Germany.

    One other component of "how far behind we remain" would surely be the unemployment rate of 4.8 percent, second lowest (to Japan) in the Group of Seven. The Human Development Report's figures (from 2002) show Austria, Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Finland, Greece and Spain to have higher rates. In fact, the latest figures from Eurostat show a rate of 9% among countries using the Euro - so that's not quite double the UK rate, then.

    "How far behind," indeed. Of course, facts rarely matter to the committed ideologue.

    Andrew Stuttaford comments: "I note that poor Polly also refers to the UK’s veto-wielding position on the UN Security council as “unearned.” Now, it’s quite possible to argue (I wouldn’t, but it’s at least possible) that the UK should no longer have that role, but to call it “unearned” seems a little hard on the Brits, at least to anyone who recalls what happened between 1939 and 1945. Something, about a war, I think."
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    (Original post by firebladez777)
    Oh. OK. Sorry. (Maybe Masefeld needs some spelling lessons)
    Lol, you're forgiven (even though you tried to make me look like an idiot ) But i agree about masefield needing spelling lessons. Maybe i should change my sig to avoid any further confusion?

    (Original post by grace)
    Lol, you're forgiven (even though you tried to make me look like an idiot ) But i agree about masefield needing spelling lessons. Maybe i should change my sig to avoid any further confusion?
    Probably a good idea. (+Thanks for forgiving me!!!)
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    Uk All The Way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    A poll would have been better

    In terms of laws, I would rather live in England than the USA.
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    (Original post by Made in the USA)
    It's not free. You are paying for it in taxes.
    The insurance companies pay for the hospital bills in the United States.
    Have you ever been to an American hospital? I've been to your hospitals.
    And which system do you think families struggling to get by on an income of under 30k per annum would prefer? Youre quite right the NHS isnt 'free', it does not however put people into debt or force them to put any financial considerations ahead of their own or their families health.
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    Id rather live in Montreal ...Its both Europrean and American

    I really don't know who said I spelled "spelled" wrong, but it is not an incorrect spelling at all.

    http://www.ultralingua.net/grammars/english/15.htm. If you look at this site it shows you that there are two different past participles of the verb 'spell'. One is 'spelt' and the other is 'spelled', and both are equally acceptable.
 
 
 
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