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    (Original post by john2054)
    I think the grade is more important than the uni. So for example, someone with a 'good degree' would be chosen over someone with a desmond, even if the first was from a 'poor' university, and the second from cambridge. I may be mistaken though??
    Are you serious?
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    Both are important degree grade, degree subject and university choice. Russell group Unis enjoy a better reputation than ex-polys that is a fact.


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    (Original post by h3110)
    Are you serious?
    A 'good degree' being two one or above. This is the standard entry requirement for entry in to masters level programs, regardless of where you took it.
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    (Original post by ThePricklyOne)
    No it doesn't matter.

    Employers want a degree in a relevant subject if you're applying to be a teacher or work in STEM area. Better if you have work experience in the area you are applying for.

    For Masters/PhD - the classification of the degree & subject matters more.
    So you want to say to me that a degree from Imperial or Cambridge has the same value to a similar degree from London Met? I kind of find this hard to believe.
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    Well, of course it should massively matter which universities you end up at if you do 'go to university'. Go to university, sure, but for god's sake lol, WHICH university is what I think anyone should hold as a major concern. Why would you go to a university you are not going to be happy to be at? I don't even mean to refer to only traditionally top universities as being awesomely important. If you want to get into acting for example and want to be in London, wouldn't you prefer to go to the Guidhall or Sylvia Young School versus the Mountview Academy or the Urdang?

    It matters for more reasons than simply goddamn job prospects thereafter too. If you want to stay on in education and work in academia, you might derive greater contention and happiness, and status for yourself, from having gone to a prestigious university.

    What I will opnely say is by far most important for me is that we come to know of people who are alike. We tend to come to know of similar people. If you're at a harder-to-get-into university with higher entry requirements it's I think safe to say you will, obviously, be around better educated people. A level of education and an intelligence level is not the same thing at all, but they do correlate, so being around better educated people by being at a harder-to-get-into university may mean possibly more intelligent eventual company. Having eventually somewhat academic or somewhat intelligent (female) friends means a great deal to me personally. I want fairly intelligent overall company desperately badly. Being around better educated and/or more intelligent company will also potentially mean more successful company into the future, if gaining career connections is much of a concern for you.

    I don't primarily care about that, career connections, nor do I primairily care about greater job prospects through being at a greater university or any more career-oriented aims, because I am much more enthusiastic for and I very badly want to simply be on top of life and to be doing really pretty well academically speaking. I want to be at a great university which complements the level at which I am working, if I study/learn hard, and I have started to question a lot what stops me from becoming a professor or academic.

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    For a Masters degree, not very much. For some jobs, it can be extremely important for the first sift.

    This is chiefly because of the quality of the information available to the recruiter. For a masters degree, how you performed on the bachelors degree will be very good indicator of your capacity, for most jobs that isn't as obviously true.

    Also the case is that the references from the degree awarding institution will here be more pointed and more valued. I someone is studying English at a non-storied institution, still her thesis supervisor there will have gotten a first and a PhD at a very good institution. His recommendation counts, then; the more so since he might know and be known to the person assessing your application. It's a small world and is the same world; while he won't be known to anyone at Deloitte & Touche.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I think the grade is more important than the uni. So for example, someone with a 'good degree' would be chosen over someone with a desmond, even if the first was from a 'poor' university, and the second from cambridge. I may be mistaken though??
    You are mistaken.
    Your degree class is where you rank in the year- getting a first from a lousy uni means you are the best of mediocrity. It does make me sad that 2:2s from Oxbridge many of whom I believe would get 1sts at poorer unis are filtered out in masses by the job market because of that 2:1 cut off.
    I have seen many exam papers from my subject at a number of Russel Group unis and it was quite surprising because they are BEeeeehind. I have no doubt a 2:2 in my own subject would cruise to a first- this is even some unis ranked near the bottom of the top 10. I have to confess also I have seen Cambridge maths papers and there really is no doubt in my mind now that their degree is tougher than ours. I would not be surprised if a third class from Cambridge (mathmo) would get a first at whatever uni of their choice (except Warwick, Oxford, Imperial and some high up ones)- no exaggeration.
    The reason for the gap highly likely is that falling behind and struggling compounds itself on such difficult, fast paced courses and your predicament gets depressingly worse and worse till you end up with a third- it's not because they suddenly got lazy or their ability just waned all of a sudden. I refuse to believe a first student from Lancaster is anywhere near the same calibre.
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    You are mistaken.
    Your degree class is where you rank in the year- getting a first from a lousy uni means you are the best of mediocrity. It does make me sad that 2:2s from Oxbridge many of whom I believe would get 1sts at poorer unis are filtered out in masses by the job market because of that 2:1 cut off.
    I have seen many exam papers from my subject at a number of Russel Group unis and it was quite surprising because they are BEeeeehind. I have no doubt a 2:2 in own subject would cruise to a first- this is even some unis ranked near the bottom of the top 10.
    What degree do you have then?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    What degree do you have then?
    Mathematics Oxford 2:1
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    Mathematics Oxford 2:1
    what year, and did you do a dissertation?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    what year, and did you do a dissertation?
    I'm in my third year- and no it's examination based for me. I also have a computing project as well (Matlab)
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    Mathematics
    Mathematics is (with e.g. Music) a special case because the sorting at 18 is so much more reliable than is true for many other subjects, and would be more reliable at 14 than is true even at 18 for most subjects in the Arts and Humanities.
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    I'm in my third year- and no it's examination based for me. I also have a computing project as well (Matlab)
    you do realise it's incorrect to say you have a degree, when you don't? I thought an oxford undergraduate of all people would know this?!?!
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    Mathematics is (with e.g. Music) a special case because the sorting at 18 is so much more reliable than is true for many other subjects, and would be more reliable at 14 than is true even at 18 for most subjects in the Arts and Humanities.
    Good analysis- if you're a stronger mathematician aged 14 highly likely you will be also at 18 and also 25 etc- it's just one of those subjects. It doesn't weirdly flip after three years of university
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    (Original post by john2054)
    you do realise it's incorrect to say you have a degree, when you don't? I thought an oxford undergraduate of all people would know this?!?!
    I am basing this on 1st,2nd year performance and my expected performance this year which will highly likely be the same (as with most)- I thought you implicitly knew I was an undergrad when you asked what year I was in ...
    Also it doesn't really change anything in that paragraph whether I've graduated or not.
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    You are mistaken.
    Your degree class is where you rank in the year
    You're mistaken

    Very few (if any) universities award degree class based on in year grade distribution.

    Degree classifications are based on specific criteria set down in the programme and module specifications and the university regulations. They're subject to external examination by academics from other universities. While that doesn't mean every university will have precisely the same standard as every other you are mistaken in your understanding of degree classifications and the quality process followed in UK universities.
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    Good analysis- if you're a stronger mathematician aged 14 highly likely you will be also at 18 and also 25 etc- it's just one of those subjects.
    that's right. But I'm suggesting this as a weakness in your argument: that you are extrapolating from what's true in a special case, maths.

    I think it isn't true that two lecturers, qualified to know, will at e.g. Middlesex look at a maths student and say "he could do Part III", and surely they never do. But it might happen in English or in Philosophy, and it quite often does.

    Imagine that the incoming maths cohorts at Leeds (a respectably good university) and Cambridge were swapped about. Both departments would have noticed the difference in this year's intake by the end of the first week. But the incoming students in French or in Sociology? I wonder honestly if it would ever be picked up on.
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    (Original post by cambio wechsel)
    that's right. But I'm suggesting this as a weakness in your argument: that you are extrapolating from what's true in a special case, maths.

    I think it isn't true that two lecturers, qualified to know, will at e.g. Middlesex look at a maths student and say "he could do Part III", and surely they never do. But it might happen in English or in Philosophy, and it quite often does.

    Imagine that the incoming maths cohorts at Leeds (a respectably good university) and Cambridge were swapped about. Both departments would have noticed the difference in this year's intake by the end of the first week. But the incoming students in French or in Sociology? I wonder honestly if it would ever be picked up on.
    Oh sorry I forgot to say... in my head my argument was all for mathematics- I know nothing of the other subjects. I should have said from the outset of that paragraph.
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    (Original post by Arcane1729)
    I am basing this on 1st,2nd year performance and my expected performance this year which will highly likely be the same (as with most)- I thought you implicitly knew I was an undergrad when you asked what year I was in ...
    Also it doesn't really change anything in that paragraph whether I've graduated or not.
    There is a reason why your degree is considered on the same as mine, when considering certain applications. And common sense is one of them!>?!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    There is a reason why your degree is considered on the same as mine, when considering certain applications. And common sense is one of them!>?!
    Common sense is common. My degree is not. There is still a little imbalance in value there I reckon. Supply and demand bro
 
 
 
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