Overground
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#81
Report 11 years ago
#81
(Original post by Catsmeat)
From your -poorly structured- reply, I can just about tease out one message; that you feel that Political Correctness is 'out of hand'. However, this only clarifies the argument that many who oppose political correction do so because it challenges the crude categorisations on which they have constructed their world. This is a system whereby their own identity may feel 'threatened' through this development.

If you actually look into the history and cultural usage of derogotary, categorical stereotyping in the UK -or any nation- you will soon realise that political correctness is a measure to right the abject rascism that was, until only a few years ago, institutionally unchecked. Read the poetry of Kipling; the polemic of Mosley; the Black and White Minstrel show of the 1960s; each uses crude stereotypes to exploit power or money elsewhere -Kipling was writing 'to-his-class' of Colonial, Raj officials; Mosley was exploiting racial and economic tension through demonising the 'Other'; rascism in television sought to use popular categories as a means to attract an audience that saw the world on such binary terms.
Wow. Do you EVER come out with short, abusive, sarcastic comments?

All of your responses are immaculately worded and argued, referencing historical events and with just the right amount of detail.

I'm not arse-licking, I just have immense respect for your self-control and dignity when dealing with idiots, you're amazing
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Catsmeat
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#82
Report 11 years ago
#82
(Original post by Overground)
Wow. Do you EVER come out with short, abusive, sarcastic comments?

All of your responses are immaculately worded and argued, referencing historical events and with just the right amount of detail.

I'm not arse-licking, I just have immense respect for your self-control and dignity when dealing with idiots, you're amazing
I come up with amazing one-liners, but often ten hours after I finish a post. I'm humbled that you find something of use in my posting record -which is my intent-, but it may only reflect the sustained fear that my University supervisors will tear my next essay to shreds.

I realised a long time ago that many arguments concerning stereotypes are only sustained because they are not questioned validly, and only bracketed out or reduced to anger and white noise. It seems that stereotypes represent the categorisation of the world around us -which is a seemingly natural phenomena- but should be done in such a way that does not fear, but inquires about, the 'Other'.
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Overground
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#83
Report 11 years ago
#83
(Original post by Catsmeat)
I come up with amazing one-liners, but often ten hours after I finish a post. I'm humbled that you find something of use in my posting record -which is my intent-, but it may only reflect the sustained fear that my University supervisors will tear my next essay to shreds.

I realised a long time ago that many arguments concerning stereotypes are only sustained because they are not questioned validly, and only bracketed out or reduced to anger and white noise. It seems that stereotypes represent the categorisation of the world around us -which is a seemingly natural phenomena- but should be done in such a way that does not fear, but inquires about, the 'Other'.
Yes, the identification, isolation and identification of a particular 'Other' or 'Others' has played a significant role in almost every regime or idea that we consider to be unpalatable. Scapegoating serves to drag scrutiny away from the scapegoater, and spreads fear and division rather than hope and unity.
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Catsmeat
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#84
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#84
(Original post by Overground)
Yes, the identification, isolation and identification of a particular 'Other' or 'Others' has played a significant role in almost every regime or idea that we consider to be unpalatable. Scapegoating serves to drag scrutiny away from the scapegoater, and spreads fear and division rather than hope and unity.
Yet there is also an unfortunate degree of misplaced knowledge; groups know, when stereotyping, that they are basing their categorisations/assumptions on unquantifiable ideas, yet they support their identity in opposition (it may be that through rascism groups of individuals can nucleate under another cultural banner; 'Anglo-Saxon, working-class male' for example).

In these cases it may be related to what Eriksen (who writes excellently on ethnicity and nationalism) has identified as power disparities. He would also support the idea that ethnic classification is contingent on stereotypes being "efficient" -therefore they have to be simple to survive. A stereotype that; "7.82% of Indian males do such-and-such" would not be efficient, because it is based on specifics and is open, therefore, to judgement. Creating easily reproducable stereotypes about cultural groups means that there is a greater chance that they can be "confirmed". In Britian it is this "Anglo-Saxon white male" that "controls the discourse" (again, another appropriate phrase of Eriksen's), reproducing them through The Mail and The Sun.
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Asclepius
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#85
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#85
(Original post by Oswy)
Ok, but there's something a little strange in wanting to make reference to ethnicity where it's not relevant to the subject matter. In other words, the desire to highlight that someone is black (or white) in a discussion or conversation, seemingly simply for its own sake, suggests some kind of undue fixation. Would you specifically make reference to someone's shoe-size or hair-colour when discussing, say, the kind of food they like? I don't think you would.
At no point did I make a statement saying that I refer to someone's ethnicity when it is not relevant, nor that I condone any such behaviour. However, my original point was that there is nothing wrong with the use of terms such as black, or asian, when it is appropriate
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Oswy
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#86
Report 11 years ago
#86
(Original post by Alex L)
At no point did I make a statement saying that I refer to someone's ethnicity when it is not relevant, nor that I condone any such behaviour. However, my original point was that there is nothing wrong with the use of terms such as black, or asian, when it is appropriate
Agreed and agreed.
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Asclepius
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#87
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#87
(Original post by Oswy)
Agreed and agreed.
Thanks lol, didn't want to be branded a racist that's all
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ForeverIsMyName
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#88
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#88
(Original post by Alex L)
Thanks lol, didn't want to be branded a racist that's all
People like to throw the term around; it's like 'fascist' and 'communist' - If anyone says it to you, it's likely to be far more of a reflection upon them than upon you.
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trance addict
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#89
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#89
politcally correct pizza

*here you are sir heres your pizza.. you stare at an empty plate*
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