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Lyrical Ballads. Yes That Old Chestnut ! watch

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    (Original post by Ed.)
    Ok I have finished my notes of themes. In the spirit of thanking everybody for their advice, I will put the document up for people to download. Take what I have written with very large pinch of salt. You are welcome to plagiarize the **** out of it, as that is what I did to a number of sources writing these notes.

    I've converted it to a word document, that everybody should be able to use.
    Thanks a lot! Now I foresee a long night of cramming and a long morning of it too xD
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    (Original post by Mirain)
    haha loving the lines written above...

    ummmm, im just wondering with the theme of childhood - what coleridge poems would you refer to? The foster mother's tale? I dunno, i really have no clue.

    if you are going to use a Coleridge poem, then the foster mother's tale will have to be the one.
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    thank you very much for that word document, ed! so are most people merging the themes of supernatural and imagination?
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    (Original post by Mirain)
    haha loving the lines written above...

    ummmm, im just wondering with the theme of childhood - what coleridge poems would you refer to? The foster mother's tale? I dunno, i really have no clue.
    I'm yoinking this out of a study guide - make of it what you will!

    The Nightingale
    The final paragraph describes a fairwell to friends and introduces the theme of childhood. Coleridge was determined that his own son Hartley would not suffer the unhappiness which he had experienced at Christ's Hospital. His sentiments on childhood reflect somethinng of Rousseau's view that each child should be free to develop its own innate character while living as close as possible to the influences of nature.

    I realise after typing that out - that's context related. Argh! Still helpful though But yes, in the Nightingale Coleridge loves his "dear Babe" who is hushed by the moon (power of nature - anyone?) and he declares "But if that heaven Should give me life, his childhood shall grow up familiar with these songs "
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    Does anyone have any notes on the Foster Mother's Tale?

    Say, it was childhood, how likely to do you rekon they would ask "How do Wordsworth and Coleridge present" or just "how is childhood presented in LBs" ?

    thanks
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    I'm banking on the theme of childhood coming up, Romantics did love their kiddies..
    Here is some notes on childhood i'm typing up as revision, i hope they dont lower anyone's intelligence.

    Poems of choice : 'We are Seven', 'Anecdote for fathers' and 'The Nightingale'

    intro - Something along the lines of how important children were to Romanticism, due to the fact a child has had less time to be' corrupted' by formal education and society, therefore s/he is more a part of the natural world and observes life without the distractions that adults face ie. sexual pursuits. They provide a contrast to adults lust of knowledge and rationality.

    Children are described with a link to nature in the poems.
    (We are Seven)
    - "she had a rustic woodland air"
    - "wildly clad" (contrast to Goody Blake whom is 'thinly clad')
    - "Her eyes were fair, and very fair" - (idea that eyes are the window to the soul, which in this case are 'very fair' as they haven't yet witnessed what 'man has made of man')

    (Anecdote for fathers)
    - "rustic dress" - child of nature
    - "cast in beauty's mould"

    (The Nightingale)
    - "Natures playmate"
    - "he knows well the evening star" -understands nature


    Children in their innocence are full of wisdom, but not reason obsessed like adults.

    "their graves are green, they may be seen" (W.A.S) death is not viewed negatively, but with the colour of life. internal rhyme livens up rhythm to emphasise that death is not destructive and solemn.

    "In careless mood he looked at me/ And said, 'At Kilve I'd rather be" (A.F.F) 'careless mood' suggests he is innocent and honest and needs no reason to base his answer. Romantic theme of emotion over reason.

    "he would place his hand beside his ear/ And bid us listen!" (The Nightingale)
    Although the child is 'capable of no articulate sound,' he is able to enjoy and recognise the tranquility and beauty of nature.

    The adults in w.a.s and a.f.f represent the dogmatic attitude of the classical movement, through their obsession with knowledge.
    "Your limbs they are alive" , "But they are dead; those two are dead!" (w.a.s)
    the syntax in the latter quote helps make the adult sound exasperated, but also ridicules and unsympathetic.

    The father constantly questions the boy on his decision, but the child cannot rationalise his emotion. "And five times did i say to him, Why? Edward tell me why?"

    Like the adults the poems ridged structure resembles the contemporary view that parents should have a firm hold on their children. but each poem deviates and varies its form to show the romantics unconventional view that we can learn from a childs innocence.

    W.A.S - Uses a mix between iambic pentameter and tetrameter.
    A.F.F - last line of every stanza has 3 iambs rather than 4.

    The Nightingale has a conversational form which is free flowing, (like the innocence and wisdom of a child?)

    Getting tedious now so thats it, sorry if its confusing. Feel free to criticize it!
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    (Original post by jameskelsall)
    Does anyone have any notes on the Foster Mother's Tale?

    Say, it was childhood, how likely to do you rekon they would ask "How do Wordsworth and Coleridge present" or just "how is childhood presented in LBs" ?

    thanks
    To be ..really.. annoying - it could be either. And to be honest, they are the same question. It doesn't matter how the question's worded, you still need to be reffering to the poets in your answer, ie Wordsworth does this, Coleridge does that.

    If the question is because you wouldn't want to refer to a Coleridge poem - well, technically you could not refer to him if the question simply stated "How is childhood presented.." but my teacher has always told us to try and get a Coleridge poem in there, and not simply refer to Wordsworth, as both are the creator's of the collection, revolutionaries, blaaahblabla.
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    (Original post by willenium)
    yeah

    if it does come up remember wordsworth was more inclined towards imagination while coleridge was focused on the supernatural
    I dont think that, thats really the case. Coleridge was just as interested if not more in the power of the imagination... famous - the mind is like a "cavern measureless to man". He took opium because he felt it unlocked his mind. Wordsworth followed him in this, in T.A " when thy mind shall be a mansion for all lovely forms" similar to " caverns... "
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    Okay thank - you, I guess it will be the Foster Mother's tale then as the Coleridge poem in relation to childhood.

    I am dying! I can't believe this is tomorrow. Oh my goodness. ****.
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    I've been revising solidly for about 7 hours. Even though I've only scratched the surface of what I have to do for lyrical ballads I'm considering stopping now... so tired! I suppose I can always wake up early tomorrow and do some more.
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    (Original post by Mirain)
    Okay thank - you, I guess it will be the Foster Mother's tale then as the Coleridge poem in relation to childhood.

    I am dying! I can't believe this is tomorrow. Oh my goodness. ****.

    OR you could write that although the Foster Mother's tale does touch upon childhood to some degree, the theme on the whole is mainly present within the Wordsworth poems.

    as for it being tomorrow, just think of all the other exams that have been and gone: it's just another to add to your shiny collection. hopefully that should calm a few nerves. :cool:
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    Ah, I think I'll do what you suggested Camull, good idea. that means i don't have to talk for ever and ever about a poem I don't know that well... The problem about adding this to my shiny collection is the fact that I've sat this paper before, I have a deep resentment towards the Lyrical Ballads and always will do lol!
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    Do you think 5-10 quotations is good in the essay?
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    has anyone got typed up notes of the supernatural and imagination in the ancient mariner? id be eternally grateful.
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    (Original post by decembers)
    has anyone got typed up notes of the supernatural and imagination in the ancient mariner? id be eternally grateful.
    Search for my post a page or so back. The one with a downloadable word document. I typed up lots of notes, there is a section of what you ask about.
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    what would everyone write for imagination?

    we are seven

    what would u say for tintern abbey??
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    (Original post by linziobbee)
    what would everyone write for imagination?

    we are seven

    what would u say for tintern abbey??
    I have quite a lot for Tintern Abbey - you can link it to the prologue because it sums up the romantic's natural influences and their relationship with nature. Tintern Abbey is not just a conventionally beautiful place, but to WW it inspires feelings and creativity, even when he just thinks about the place - he sees it as a comfort to him when he is removed from nature. It is also about him reflecting on his youth - he used to think of the place as just beautiful, now he realises that his praise of the place can be deepened by his understanding of nature as a powerful force.

    Or something along those lines xD
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    I wouldn't just revise childhood and imagination, as they aren't necessarily that broad topics.

    It's still only the second time they've put out the paper, so it's likely they'll give people faily obvious, and not too difficult questions. At least one hopes.
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    The essay thread is key revision xD

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...s#post12571343
 
 
 
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