Ridiculous university choices Watch

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Frannnnn
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#81
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#81
FUUUU kingston is good! i know many people coming out with a 1st from kingston.
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hayleyk
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#82
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#82
Whoever said UEA is crap
Have a look into their creative writing programme; it is, I believe, one of the most competitive courses of its kind in the country.

And I went there for an open day and was so impressed with the history/politics departments..plus it's so much friendlier than Nottingham which is 'up there' some would say..just open day is a big deal clencher rather than reputation to me. I'm predicted AAAC which I know i won't get but I feel pretty hurt at anyone dismissing UEA really...God knows I may not even meet my offer (AAB) but ...still
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Vraicanon
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#83
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#83
Someone said I was ridiculous for accepting Swansea as my firm over Manchester and Birmingham. I don't think it's ridiculous. I'd rather feel comfortable in the city, if I hate the place I'm not gonna do as well as if I'm comfortable.
Who cares about league tables? If you're determined you can do well anywhere.
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Danielle89
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#84
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#84
I went to RGU over Strathclyde to study pharmacy. Strathclyde has been a School of Pharmacy for longer than RGU, but it is more based around research, which I'm not as interested in. RGU has a very high graduate employment rate - and by this I mean graduates going into jobs related to their degree. Also, I much prefer Aberdeen as a city compared to Glasgow, it's closer to home, halls are 5 minutes away from the campus, lots and lots of friendly people, Pharmacy is clearly seen as one of RGU's most important degrees with a 3 floor building dedicated to it and lots of funding for social events as well as equipment etc.

Prestige isn't everything. Just because a uni is steeped in history doesn't mean it's the best choice for everyone.
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Angel_Cake
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#85
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(Original post by The Lad)
It amazes me how people on here go on and on about departments. At the end of they day, when you're out in the big wide world looking for work, most employers are more concerned about which uni you went to rather than if the deprtment in the subject you studied is good or bad. Can you honsestly imagine an employer looking at a CV from someone for example who studied at English at Thames Valley (lets say for this example that Thames Valley had the best English department in the country) thinking ''this person went to bad uni, however, the English department at Thames Valley is really good so I'll employer him'' :rolleyes:
Sorry if someone else said this, I didn't read the entire thread, but what you're more likely to learn when you leave uni is that most employers don't really care where you went/what your degree was in/what classification you got anywhere NEAR as much as you are led to believe in your sixth form/uni years. Unless you really need a specific degree (such as engineering or education or something) it really doesn't matter.
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loopylauren
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#86
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#86
I chose Aberystwyth over Nottingham and I've never made a better decision in my life! Ok, so a lot of people haven't even heard of Aber but I feel more at home there than I do over the hols in London, which to me is what counts.
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Angel_Cake
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#87
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(Original post by NeverMindThat)
Sadly TSR is so ridiculously anti-elitist that the actual truth, that the uni you pick has a PROFOUND effect on your future life and career, is rarely allowed to be stated without a barrage of braying "EVERY UNIVERSITY AND DEGREE CHOICE IS EXACTLY EQUAL!!" responses.
While I would never go so far as to say that all universities are equal and that your degree or university have no effect on your future career, to say that it has a PROFOUND effect on your future life and career just simply isn't true in the majority of cases. It is one very small element of what employers consider. Choosing a university/degree course based entirely on prestige/supposed employment prospects is a very bad idea.
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NeverMindThat
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#88
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(Original post by Angel_Cake)
While I would never go so far as to say that all universities are equal and that your degree or university have no effect on your future career, to say that it has a PROFOUND effect on your future life and career just simply isn't true in the majority of cases. It is one very small element of what employers consider. Choosing a university/degree course based entirely on prestige/supposed employment prospects is a very bad idea.
What are you basing this on? I disagree strongly, having many friends in both HR and recruiting.
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The Lad
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#89
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#89
(Original post by NeverMindThat)
What are you basing this on? I disagree strongly, having many friends in both HR and recruiting.

Exactly, I worked for a recruiting agency during the summer last year and the person repsonsible for deciding the shortlist of applcants was told by the boss to ''throw away CV's of applicants that went to rubbish universities''. They only looked at CV's of people who went to unis like Oxbridge/ Durham / Warwick/ Nottingham/ Birmignham. I think the lowest uni they would consider is somewhere like Goldsmiths or Queen Mary which is a middle-of-the-range unis. if they recieved a CV of someone who ent to Thames Valley or South Bank, they'd end up in the bin.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#90
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(Original post by The Lad)
Exactly, I worked for a recruiting agency during the summer last year and the person repsonsible for deciding the shortlist of applcants was told by the boss to ''throw away CV's of applicants that went to rubbish universities''. They only looked at CV's of people who went to unis like Oxbridge/ Durham / Warwick/ Nottingham/ Birmignham. I think the lowest uni they would consider is somewhere like Goldsmiths or Queen Mary which is a middle-of-the-range unis. if they recieved a CV of someone who ent to Thames Valley or South Bank, they'd end up in the bin.
Lool. Were these for graduate jobs or any job?
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Angel_Cake
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#91
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(Original post by NeverMindThat)
What are you basing this on? I disagree strongly, having many friends in both HR and recruiting.

I guess we can both only go off personal experience, and if you have friends working in HR and recruiting then yours is just as valid as mine! However, it would seem to me, both from my own experience and that of my friends (all of whom graduated from top ten universities) that whilst being able to list a good uni on your CV may at times help to get you an interview, once in an interview situation you are almost never asked about university or course but instead about previous work experience, your personality and characteristics and extra curricular activities. These are far more important. A friend of mine who got a first from warwick was told at a recruitment agency that her best strength was her gap year working in an office and the skills she learnt there, and that employers would be impressed with that.

Many of the graduate schemes don't really look at the university you went to but instead base their analysis of your strengths on their own exams or tests. At school I was persuaded into doing a course I didn't particularly want to do because I was told it had good employment prospects - I now have a place on one of the most competitive graduate schemes there is, for which I needed a 2.2, and for which the entire selection process is based on exams and then an assessment centre at which you are assessed entirely on how you come across on that day, and your university, course etc are not known by the interviewers and not even taken into account.

Of course I am not suggesting that anyone chooses Thames Valley over Oxford or anything like that. Obviously I realise that the better the university, the better your chances (in some cases) of getting an interview, which obviously is pretty vital if you want to get a job. However, that's where it stops. After the very first selection process, the university you went to becomes all but irrelevant. It IS important, but it does not have PROFOUND importance, and if you genuinely would be happier at a less prestigious university, you are likely to get a better degree classification, get more involved in extra curricular activities, make better friends and thus develop more social skills, and probably just have a better time. Which is what I would go for, but then we're all different.
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SirJimothy
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#92
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#92
What a toss pot Thread.

If you went by the league tables, I chose the 44rd best uni over the 12th best uni, so technically I've made a 'Ridiculous Choice'.

Pftt.
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xxxchrisxxx
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#93
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#93
I chose Southampton over Warwick, Bristol and UCL because it has the strongest reputation for engineering. I realised midway I did not want to do engineering, but I ended up with a first anyway. I do regret not choosing the uni with the best reputation because it would have opened more doors job-wise, especially now I am steering clear off engineering jobs.
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Titch89
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#94
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#94
Why does it matter what unis other people choose to go to? There are a lot more things to choosing a uni than league tables, ffs.

Personally, I would rather go somewhere I was happy with (in terms of disability support, course content, area, etc) that was really low in league tables, than somewhere that was higher and not what I want.
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NeverMindThat
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#95
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(Original post by Angel_Cake)
I guess we can both only go off personal experience, and if you have friends working in HR and recruiting then yours is just as valid as mine! However, it would seem to me, both from my own experience and that of my friends (all of whom graduated from top ten universities) that whilst being able to list a good uni on your CV may at times help to get you an interview, once in an interview situation you are almost never asked about university or course but instead about previous work experience, your personality and characteristics and extra curricular activities. These are far more important. A friend of mine who got a first from warwick was told at a recruitment agency that her best strength was her gap year working in an office and the skills she learnt there, and that employers would be impressed with that.

Many of the graduate schemes don't really look at the university you went to but instead base their analysis of your strengths on their own exams or tests. At school I was persuaded into doing a course I didn't particularly want to do because I was told it had good employment prospects - I now have a place on one of the most competitive graduate schemes there is, for which I needed a 2.2, and for which the entire selection process is based on exams and then an assessment centre at which you are assessed entirely on how you come across on that day, and your university, course etc are not known by the interviewers and not even taken into account.

Of course I am not suggesting that anyone chooses Thames Valley over Oxford or anything like that. Obviously I realise that the better the university, the better your chances (in some cases) of getting an interview, which obviously is pretty vital if you want to get a job. However, that's where it stops. After the very first selection process, the university you went to becomes all but irrelevant. It IS important, but it does not have PROFOUND importance, and if you genuinely would be happier at a less prestigious university, you are likely to get a better degree classification, get more involved in extra curricular activities, make better friends and thus develop more social skills, and probably just have a better time. Which is what I would go for, but then we're all different.

This only applies if you went to a top 30 or so uni. If you went to a top 30, other factors will probably prevail except for certain jobs (law + banking); anyone from another top 30 is on a reasonably level field

If you went to a low ranked, less-respected uni, you can expect to have to FIGHT for a decent white-collar job. Whatever a lot of people on here seem to claim, graduate recruiters often wont even put reasonable candidates from bad unis up for consideration, even if on consideration they might be worth employing.

It does gall me that often the people fighting for 'uni doesnt matter much' usually went to a very good uni; thats all very well for you to say.
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InnocentEyes
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#96
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(Original post by NeverMindThat)
This only applies if you went to a top 30 or so uni. If you went to a top 30, other factors will probably prevail except for certain jobs (law + banking); anyone from another top 30 is on a reasonably level field
I agree with this to an extent. On TSR it isn't people saying that reputation matters in some cases that bothers me, it's more the attitude that one should pick, say, a uni ranked 8th for your subject over one ranked 15th purely based on that (probably subjective) assessment of its reputation. As I said before, evidenced by the flood of PMs I get asking why on earth I would drop out of LSE to go to Durham, and saying that I obviously 'don't care about prestige'. Clearly I care, or I would be going to Sussex, cause I'd much rather live near Brighton for three years than in the frozen north :p:.
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NeverMindThat
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#97
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(Original post by InnocentEyes)
I agree with this to an extent. On TSR it isn't people saying that reputation matters in some cases that bothers me, it's more the attitude that one should pick, say, a uni ranked 8th for your subject over one ranked 15th purely based on that (probably subjective) assessment of its reputation. As I said before, evidenced by the flood of PMs I get asking why on earth I would drop out of LSE to go to Durham, and saying that I obviously 'don't care about prestige'. Clearly I care, or I would be going to Sussex, cause I'd much rather live near Brighton for three years than in the frozen north :p:.
ranking for subjects is almost utterly irrelevent

ranking of the uni is, largely, irrelevent. the 6th uni wont be looked apon much differently from the 9th.

BANDING on the other hand, is extremely important. If your university is top band, it makes a HUGE HUGE HUGE amount of difference when trying to find a competative job, and you can use ranks to guess at band.

LSE and Durham are both top flight top band unis, so tbh it makes little difference.

If youd dropped one or other to go to sussex, then you would have a legitimate argument.
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InnocentEyes
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#98
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#98
(Original post by NeverMindThat)
ranking for subjects is almost utterly irrelevent

ranking of the uni is, largely, irrelevent. the 6th uni wont be looked apon much differently from the 9th.


BANDING on the other hand, is extremely important. If your university is top band, it makes a HUGE HUGE HUGE amount of difference when trying to find a competative job, and you can use ranks to guess at band.

LSE and Durham are both top flight top band unis, so tbh it makes little difference.

If youd dropped one or other to go to sussex, then you would have a legitimate argument.
indeed. exactly what I want to tell all the LSE lovers who pm me
and oy, I do have a legitimate argument. they are the ones who don't :p:
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foxo
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#99
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I'm not claiming that university reputation doesn't matter at all. What I will state is that too many people on this forum aren't able to recognise good universities. Many seem to believe that if it's not in the "top twenty" then you might as well pack it in and work in McDonalds. That is complete and utter *******s, especially considering the inadequacy of league tables in many areas and their insistence on using horribly dated and often inaccurate and irrelevant statistics.

It's particularly evident with Scottish universities - ask the average TSR user and they'll probably say there are only three or four good universities up here, if not less; whereas someone who knows what they're talking about would more than likely say eight, if not more.

Oh, and before one of you says that my opinion reflects my university choice I think that you'll find Glasgow appears in the top 20 UK universities in all three of the latest league tables and the international ones. :p:
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flugestuge
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#100
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#100
(Original post by The Lad)
For example, one of friends choose Uni. of Portsmouth over Uni of East Anglia because it had a more vibrant nightlife. :eek:

Another friend was going to choose Kingston Uni over Uni of Bristol :eek: because he's a very good footballer and said there are more opportunities to join football clubs in London than Bristol.
Not much difference between those universities.
It is not like choosing London Met instead of Oxford.
Now THAT would be rather foolish
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