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Degree "post nominal letters" ie. oxon - needed? watch

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    (Original post by Nyet)
    Tbh, your positions, when weighed against what you are actually doing re academia, marks you out as a bit of a disgrace, in all honesty. No, scratch that. A colossal disgrace.
    Explain yourself. I want to at least be standing up if I'm going to take that!
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    I want a DIC
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    The main use of it is to distinguish between 'real' MA's, and MA's that are really BA's from Oxbridge or Trinity college.
    *Cough*andAberdeen,Dundee,Edinbu rgh,GlasgowandStAndrewspresumabl y*Cough*
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    (Original post by ashy)
    I want a DIC
    I'll give you one.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Well, I'm all in favour of just giving Oxonians/Cantabrigians BAs; why should they automatically obtain MAs? :curious:
    I don't believe they automatically get them at Oxbridge and Dublin, but can be claimed after a period of good standing as a graduate. They are automatically given in the five traditional universities in Scotland.

    Why? Because they were doing it this way long before any other universities were even conceived of. More properly, however, a degree status is not traditionally a measure of academic learning, but rather of rank. Hence the practice of awarding honorary doctorates and such.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I don't believe they automatically get them at Oxbridge and Dublin, but can be claimed after a period of good standing as a graduate. They are automatically given in the five traditional universities in Scotland.
    No, they get them automatically 3 years after graduating from Oxbridge, they don't need to do any graduate work to be applicable. I don't know about Dublin, but I'd imagine that it's the same.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    No, they get them automatically 3 years after graduating from Oxbridge, they don't need to do any graduate work to be applicable. I don't know about Dublin, but I'd imagine that it's the same.
    I certainly didn't imply post-graduate work, but it stands to reason that they have to be granted - and to be granted, they have to be asked for. Indeed, as I understand it, a fee is usually payable.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    No, they get them automatically 3 years after graduating from Oxbridge, they don't need to do any graduate work to be applicable. I don't know about Dublin, but I'd imagine that it's the same.
    For Oxford at least, it's 21 terms after matriculation, so the wait to pay and get one's MA depends on how long the course is/the type of course studied
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I certainly didn't imply post-graduate work, but it stands to reason that they have to be granted - and to be granted, they have to be asked for. Indeed, as I understand it, a fee is usually payable.
    "Certainly", forceful eh? :cool:

    That doesn't make it any better though, in my eyes at least -- that they have to ask for and pay for it, that just makes it seem even more inequitable.
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    The problem with the MA is that, in many scottish universities it is only granted to arts students. So, for nominally the same level of work a science student gets a BSc and an arts student gets an MA. Also, although rare, this has led to some confusion regarding the status of my undergraduate masters degree in chemistry, which is of a higher level than a BSc and MA at my awarding institution.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    *Cough*andAberdeen,Dundee,Edinbu rgh,GlasgowandStAndrewspresumabl y*Cough*
    ...and the ancients I of course meant to say :p:
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Explain yourself. I want to at least be standing up if I'm going to take that!
    Forcefully denying that non-Oxbridge students are less academic than those who go to Oxbridge, and then proceeding to re-apply from a perfectly serviceable redbrick to Cambridge because, I assume, you believe you are above it/could do better.
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    (Original post by Nyet)
    Forcefully denying that non-Oxbridge students are less academic than those who go to Oxbridge, and then proceeding to re-apply from a perfectly serviceable redbrick to Cambridge because, I assume, you believe you are above it/could do better.


    I see your point, however, I don't agree with it. I would vehemently deny that non-Oxbridge students are necessarily less capable than those at Oxbridge. Though I am applying to Cambridge for the strength/way of teaching and academic facilities -- nothing to do with students. I'll happily happily accept that one might have more academic opportunities at Oxbridge; what I won't accept is that this necessarily means that every student is better than every student at other universities, a view which is often (and sometimes unwittingly) veered into.
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    Hi guys- I just wanted to ask- I have a BA(Hons) but putting the (Lond.) after that looks silly because of the two sets of brackets.
    Basically I am BA(Hons) (Lond.), MA(Belf.)

    Is it now the assumption that all BA's are Honours degrees so I should just put
    BA(Lond.), MA(Belf.)?

    Thanks!
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    You should actually just use BA(Hons), MA. The other stuff is both superfluous and, technically, wrong.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You should actually just use BA(Hons), MA. The other stuff is both superfluous and, technically, wrong.
    To be fair it is all convention rather than anything official. It says nowhere on either of my degree certificates how I am to abbreviate my degrees. For example the convetion of certain universities to abbreviate a Doctorate in Philosophy as DPhil and others as PhD are and entirely arbitrary.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    To be fair it is all convention rather than anything official. It says nowhere on either of my degree certificates how I am to abbreviate my degrees. For example the convetion of certain universities to abbreviate a Doctorate in Philosophy as DPhil and others as PhD are and entirely arbitrary.
    The whole thing is a kind of grammar, but if you use it wrongly you'll look a complete idiot in the eyes of those that know the grammar well, and who are generally the ones you want to impress.
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    On a note of self-grandeur, I have too many university qualifications to list the letters after my name as well as where I studied, so I break convention. Also, I hate the sound of "Exon" - it's just tacky and resembles "Oxon" far too closely. If I had too, I'd use "Exeter".

    As has been said before, the context commands the use of post-nominals more than anything. It's just down to convention. Academics, dentists, GPs and solicitors seem to reference their place of study most.
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    (Original post by oriel historian)
    in this case, it's more than sufficiently earned. Consider that in one term alone I used to write 16 essays. That's more than most of the people I knew doing degrees at Cardiff, Leeds, or Exeter did in an entire year! People really and honestly have little idea how much work goes into an Oxford undergraduate degree.

    Oh and if we got rid of it, no graduate of Oxford would be admitted to congregration. That's another purpose of it.
    Indeed; let's not get started on the fact that Oxbridge Bachelor's degrees are worth more than Master's degrees elsewhere...
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    I disagree. You're making the assumption propagated by this anachronistic honour: i.e. Oxbridge student > other students. If all students were made to write 16 essays in a term, I'd imagine that they'd be up to a higher academic standard too. However, we cannot assume that other students could not cope with this workload or do not do a great deal of additional reading above and beyond their courses, as you are doing. Also, the honour doesn't just go to those Oxbridgians who do well -- you could get a third and still an MA. Therefore, why the honour? I don't like the assumptive stratification of students, and this seems to do just that. Oxbridge does not always equal best, though it does of course have a preponderance of intelligent students.

    Congregation? Expliquez! :p: Though of course the rules regarding congregation could of course be changed just as easily as those regarding MAs, I'm sure.
    But Oxbridge were established before other universities. If people don't like it, they should call their Master's something else.
 
 
 
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