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    (Original post by Deipnosophist123)
    The fact is, regardless of whether Bristol can explain the rejections adequately, they just don't seem logical. When people at my school get Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL and Warwick, but get rejected from Bristol, it simply doesn't make sense.

    These are people with 12+ A*s at GCSE, AAAAA+ at AS, predicted AAAA+ at A2, and with personal statements that satisfied all of the above universities (LSE are far more concerned about personal statements than Bristol, that is commonly accepted).

    And the sad fact is that many candidates who got offers from Bristol (naming no names, most of them are people not on here that I know from school etc.) were far worse than the applicants who got rejected. Average GCSEs, AAAB at AS and only doing three A2s, and with personal statements that were bland and, frankly, bad.

    Now, it may seem like I'm bitter because I was rejected by Bristol - I'm not. I'm bitter because many outstanding candidates who thoroughly deserved a place were rejected in lieu of less deserving candidates.

    When all the Economics candidates at the various private schools near me get rejected on the same day, yet people from the state sector who I know (and many of whom have less impressive applications) are not rejected / even made offers, you KNOW something is up.
    Lets think from Bristol Admission tutor point of view- If somebody is capable of getting into LSE, Warwick, Oxbridge - why will he/ she come to Bristol? Here it is not a question wether the candidate is good enough - it is question of wether applicant - will join Bristol if an offer is made. I am sure they are trying to find good candidates who will join them :yep:
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    (Original post by Eternity Forever)
    3. There are still a lot of students from private/grammar schools [more than I had expected], but there are also many from state schools. Perhaps there is more emphasis on students from a not so great educational background - due to the disputes which happened in the past about Bristol rejecting too many candidates from state schools.
    That's possibly the main reason, in my opinion, for all these surprise rejections. Obviously Bristol attracts a large amount of private/grammar school applicants and they seem to be trying to shed their reputation for private school bias (I haven't got any evidence of this, just what I've heard) so something has to give.
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    (Original post by somemightsay)
    That's possibly the main reason, in my opinion, for all these surprise rejections. Obviously Bristol attracts a large amount of private/grammar school applicants and they seem to be trying to shed their reputation for private school bias (I haven't got any evidence of this, just what I've heard) so something has to give.
    it is true :yep:
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    Our graduates probably have stronger quantitative skills than those of any other British university (as employers recognise)

    On what basis? is there a source? I assume this is just for economics graduates? Excluding joint honours degrees in Economics & Mathematics, straight mathematics, engineering etc.?
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    (Original post by Deipnosophist123)
    The fact is, regardless of whether Bristol can explain the rejections adequately, they just don't seem logical. When people at my school get Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL and Warwick, but get rejected from Bristol, it simply doesn't make sense.

    These are people with 12+ A*s at GCSE, AAAAA+ at AS, predicted AAAA+ at A2, and with personal statements that satisfied all of the above universities (LSE are far more concerned about personal statements than Bristol, that is commonly accepted).

    And the sad fact is that many candidates who got offers from Bristol (naming no names, most of them are people not on here that I know from school etc.) were far worse than the applicants who got rejected. Average GCSEs, AAAB at AS and only doing three A2s, and with personal statements that were bland and, frankly, bad.

    Now, it may seem like I'm bitter because I was rejected by Bristol - I'm not. I'm bitter because many outstanding candidates who thoroughly deserved a place were rejected in lieu of less deserving candidates.

    When all the Economics candidates at the various private schools near me get rejected on the same day, yet people from the state sector who I know (and many of whom have less impressive applications) are not rejected / even made offers, you KNOW something is up.
    LOL, not bitter?

    Maybe Bristol is looking for a bit more than what you judge to be an 'impressive' application. Perhaps they consider a wider range of factors and qualities (such as strength of character, determination and self-motivation), ones which high achieving State school students will have in bucketfulls more than your buddies at Private school.
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    (Original post by Clements-)
    Not all private school students have rich parents.
    Erm, no, not all do but I'm pretty sure I don't need to find statistics to show you that the vast majority do.

    (Original post by Clements-)
    Tbh, all you people ever have as a reason to ban private schools is 'it's not fair!' Well, that's tough. At the end of the day, if state school students were really that bothered about this so-called advantage, they'd work harder to match private school students. But some people aren't even naturally intelligent enough to do well academically. That's just how it is.
    Ha. That passage is actually repulsive. I went to a state school. I got an offer for Economics at Bristol. It's not a case of state school students working harder to match their peers at private school, it comes down to equality of opportunity, and this doesn't exist.

    I tried as hard as I could to match the grades of private school students and get into good universities. I succeeded because I'm cleverer than most people. I don't understand what you mean about a 'so-called advantage'? Is the advantage not clear enough for you to see or do you need your daddy to pay someone to explain it to you?

    Some people are clever enough to match or better private school students but they simply don't have the chance. Many state school students in this country grow up in poverty, have to sit in class with up to 40 other students and lack the resources needed to reach their potential.

    Why are you so against everyone having an equal chance to an equal education? Methinks it comes down to you being worried that if this happened, you would easily be in the shadow of thousands of state school students who are more intelligent than you due to a better standard of education.
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    old thread is old. saying that, the bitterness of the private school rejectees is still worth a good lol.
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    I am closing this thread it has gone bad.
 
 
 
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