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TSR Med Students' Society Part III Watch

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    (Original post by clarusblue)
    Just seen this on twitter, really tickled me:

    This seemsto do the rounds once a year.

    I loved listening to it in first year clinics revision haha
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    Hello! Been a while, was just wondering, which iBSc did you do? I have immunology and primary health as my choices but I can't decide which one to put first. Does having a clinical one help with ST applications? Does having a more 'scientific' one make you 'look better'? Any help appreciated (from anyone!)
    Hi, I did neuroscience - or rather am doing.

    I did it for interest, and organised a lab project in the Prion unit down at Queen Sq - awesome unit, very interesting research, and I love prions. I would say consider whether doing something different - like anthropology or law or philosophy is up your street, generally anything other than medicine - becasuse it is the last funded opportunity to branch out. Retrospectively, it might have been nice to do that.

    Studying science at the third year level is like wading through treacle. There is lots to read, and the lab project can turn into almost a full time job. Which ontop of doing a third year, yes alot of work. granted, I think I chose more units than alot of my friends. In terms of whether it makes you look better? I don't know. I don't care at this stage. Very difficult to say, an intercalated degree is 1 point in 100, and most people don't have one and do absolutly fine with a years' less debt - this is not trivial.

    Be very careful when you choose projects - ask the supervisors exactly what it is you will be doing, and how much teaching in techniques and transferable skills you will gain. What is the nature of the data? Is it for example counting cells? Is it statistical analysis, or is it something like GFP which you can see? This makes a massive difference to your dissertation, because you need to convince other people that your data is useful and valid - if you can point to glowing pictures, it helps. You need to consider whether the project is doable with your skillset and within budget. If you do human studies ?ethical approval? Will you have to write the protocols? If you do animal studies, do you need a personal liscence? (in almost all cases, yes). How much time is this going to take up? You need to avoid mission creep - lab can and does take over your life. Cells do not have empathy for your sanity or social calender. You need to think about keeping up with your other courses. It is much easier if you tag along to a college lab - I had to go through security checks, references, all sorts before I could start, which wiped a month off project time - 25% of the allotted time resource was therefore wasted.

    Lab projects go through 3 rapid phases from my experience

    1) - I don't know wtf is going on, I have no idea what I'm doing
    2) - Ok, I'm doing it right, **** all data. Data not significant.
    3) - Aha! Yes! something interesting, but I now don't have the time to persue it, project dissertation deadline was yesterday. ****. Have to write up whatever I can cobble together.

    Stage 1 and 2 takes up 90% of the time.

    Therefore, when you look at projects, you need to assess what are the chances of success. Are they sending me on a wild goose chase after some molecule/gene/product about which they know nothing? Or, has some preliminary data shown that this might be worth following up? Generally, you will be doing donkey work - but in that case, you may ll lay the ground for something that might get published so you can potentially tag along or farm an abstract out of it rather than - as in many cases of wild goose chasing, write up a negative result - which is hugely demotivating. Understand how your part of the project fits into the whole picture of how experiments in the field progress - Are you doing things the right way around? Do you understand the basis of what you are doing?

    Does your supervisor have the resources to fund you? If you're doing anything with genetics - antibodies are very expensive, materials are expensive. They need to be prepared to teach someone who ?Probably has never worked in a lab before - I told my supervisor that I have never touched a pippet, they need to understand how much looking after you need, and be willing and able to provide it - otherwise the project will be a disaster because you will flounder/screw up all your samples.



    Hope that helps
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    Ah the Bsc.
    I have wused out on the project and want to spend 10 weeks learning about death autopsy and law instead. Yay field trips!
    I am going to have fun being an arts student for 10 weeks and tbh Global health doesn't sound too taking itself either (3 half days and a day off a week, yes please!)
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    Sweet mother ****ed I'm pretty sure I bombed that exam today (neuro + HD). I can't even be bothered to get drunk either 'cause I'm nackered. My girlfriends over and I just want to stay in bed all night.

    I've already organised a costume with flatamtes though so I'm going to be forced out. Ugh.
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    :yes: Apart from being freezing due to the wind. I ended up tagging along with some 5th years in green checked shirts for a while. Did you see either of us then and not come up or completly miss us both?
    I think she was the ninja in the corner...

    I was the ninja.....
    I was fighting off some strange F1 who tried a chat up line then on further chattingness told me he wanted to be a psychistrist and then i realised he was strange and ran away.

    I didnt even know what you peoples look like!!

    Hexham is lovely and sparkley! Half of it is a private hospital.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Sweet mother ****ed I'm pretty sure I bombed that exam today (neuro + HD). I can't even be bothered to get drunk either 'cause I'm nackered. My girlfriends over and I just want to stay in bed all night.

    I've already organised a costume with flatamtes though so I'm going to be forced out. Ugh.
    Hang on, does "bombed" mean you did badly or well lol? Judging by the rest of the context I'm guessing the former?
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    Newborns next weeeeek.

    Spoiler:
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Sweet mother ****ed I'm pretty sure I bombed that exam today (neuro + HD). I can't even be bothered to get drunk either 'cause I'm nackered. My girlfriends over and I just want to stay in bed all night.

    I've already organised a costume with flatamtes though so I'm going to be forced out. Ugh.
    Yeah, I heard from a couple of people that it was rather tricky...

    But on the plus side, its arguably the hardest ICA you'll do in the first two years. HSPH and LOCO at the end of the year isn't that bad.
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    I'm being quite slow here, but if anyone could explain the difference between sensitivity and positive predictive value, I would apppreciate it!
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    (Original post by _Andrew_)
    I'm being quite slow here, but if anyone could explain the difference between sensitivity and positive predictive value, I would apppreciate it!
    I think sensitivity is the proportion of all people who really have some condition, who also test positive.

    ie the True pos / (True pos + False neg)

    *remember the false negs really have the condition too


    Whereas the PPV is the proportion of all positives which are true.

    ie the True pos / (True pos + False pos)

    The main difference being that the PPV gives you some indication of how specific the test is too (if there are waaay too many false positives then your test is probably just assuming everyone is positive. this would give you a really good sensitivity, but a poor ppv)

    Hope this helps!
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    I have come to the conclusion that our healthcare system needs to be completly overhauled.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    I have come to the conclusion that our healthcare system needs to be completly overhauled.
    To what?
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    Anyone have access to this paper, please?

    Kaltsas G, Makras P. Skeletal disease in Cushing's syndrome: osteoporosis versus arthropathy. Neuroendocrinology 2010; 92 (Suppl 1): 60-64
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Anyone have access to this paper, please?

    Kaltsas G, Makras P. Skeletal disease in Cushing's syndrome: osteoporosis versus arthropathy. Neuroendocrinology 2010; 92 (Suppl 1): 60-64
    not a med student yet but check pm
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    Such a horrible hangover to wake up to and consequently spend all morning rowing with.

    Dental Beer Race was pretty damn epic though..
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    (Original post by Wangers)

    Lab projects go through 3 rapid phases from my experience

    1) - I don't know wtf is going on, I have no idea what I'm doing
    2) - Ok, I'm doing it right, **** all data. Data not significant.
    3) - Aha! Yes! something interesting, but I now don't have the time to persue it, project dissertation deadline was yesterday. ****. Have to write up whatever I can cobble together.
    Been doing a full year of lab research and can honestly say for the last 6.5 months - that's become the cycle of my life in the lab. Currently at 1) again
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    (Original post by Tech)
    Just working on my project conclusion at the minute:

    "Therefore, the number of ****s given is inversely proportional to the length of time spent in ibsc."
    Haha, very true. But I guess one of the positives is missing Medicine, so when you go back you're enthusiastic again.

    Also why is it when you use practise samples to perfect a lab technique, everything goes perfectly. But when you use your real samples (of which you only have enough to run the assay once) - everything that could go wrong will go wrong. Grr.
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    Hmm I'm bored.
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    Soon...
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    10,000th post!!


    *Sigh* I really need to get out more.
 
 
 
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