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AQA GCSE English Literature Exams - 20th and 23rd May 2013 *OFFICAL THREAD* Watch

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    The Crucible:

    Putnams, Danforth, Cheever or Tituba. The first two are more likely to come up, Cheever and Tituba are more minor characters. But minor characters can come up and have done before. Elizabeth and John have yet to come up, but they're both easy characters, considering the last two characters have been Mary Warran and Giles Corey, I don't expect us to get a character as easy as the Proctors. If I was a betting man, I'd go for both or one of the Putnams. It'll definitely be a character I have listed here.

    Of Mice and Men:

    It will be a setting, such as nature, or if its a character, Slim, Curley or Georgie and Lennie., If they go for a character, I think it'll be Slim. Foundation 2013 was Slim, I have a feeling he'll be the higher this time if they go for a character. It's worth noting that George and Lennie have only come up once, in January 2011 I think. They were together. It wouldn't surprise me if the passage featured Slim, George and Lennie, perhaps where Slim shows sympathy to Lennie, part B could then relate to disabilities, Slim is the only character that really understands Lennie on the ranch. If the character is Curley, I still expect to see Slim involved. Perhaps where Slim takes control of the situation after the Lennie/George fight. They could well ask us to compare two characters, Slim and Curley have yet to come up, those two are completely opposite characters with different traits, that wouldn't surprise me one bit.

    I expect Slim to be involved though if its based on characters, whether it be with George, George and Lennie, or with Curley. I

    That's my two cents anyway.
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    How will the exam work? Will we be given an extract and use the extract to explain a character? Or will it just be a question?
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    (Original post by Hilton184)
    Hi guys, is anybody aware of what came up in January 2013 in Lord of the Flies and Of Mice and Men?

    I know Crooks did, but was this close analysis or for part b? Thanks.
    Lord of the Flies was...

    1. "Choose two significant events in Lord of the Flies which you consider to be important. Write about the significance of these events and how Golding presents them."

    OR

    2. "What do you think is the importance of fire in Lord of the Flies? How does Golding present different ideas about fire in the novel?"
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    (Original post by higuyslol)
    how should i structure my response e.g how many paragraphs

    (Original post by tso97)
    Can someone post an a* example of any question or how to write one(things like structure and length), i would really appreciate it


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    (Original post by Hilton184)
    Hi guys, is anybody aware of what came up in January 2013 in Lord of the Flies and Of Mice and Men?

    I know Crooks did, but was this close analysis or for part b? Thanks.

    here is my post with it all

    it has the jan 2013 papers
    and a 30/30 OMAM answer

    thats how i would structure it :

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7#post42653777
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    (Original post by lolface32)
    How will the exam work? Will we be given an extract and use the extract to explain a character? Or will it just be a question?
    You'll be given a passage that features a character or setting. You will have to analyse that and talk about the character or setting.

    Then part B normally relates to the character in the passage, but asks you to talk about a theme. Eg. The American dream - Or you may be asked to talk about people with disabilities, how some characters are isolated. etc.
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    Ok, this will sound stupid but how do you relate George to the context? So far I've got:
    • rarity of friendship
    • LOTS to say about the American Dream
    • maybe how him shooting Lennie is an act of kindness, which presents the lack of understanding that most people had towards the mentally retarded? It presents the harshness of society (is this a bit off-topic for an answer about George?)
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    Hi, could someone grade this essay on The Crucible? It's a made up question on Elizabeth Proctor. If anyone has any other points that could be made, that would be useful too.

    'How is Elizabeth presented by Miller, and how do you respond?'

    In The Crucible, Elizabeth Proctor serves as John's motivation to go to Salem to bring justice out after she is arrested.
    Miller initially presents Elizabeth as an aloof character in Act 1, when Abigail says that she is a 'bitter... snivelling woman'. Due to Parris' begrudging and hostile feeling toward Abigail, we feel some sympathy toward her, and begin to judge Elizabeth based on Abigail's portrayal of her.
    The use of the word 'cold' implies a lack of feeling, as if Elizabeth is unable to sympathize with anyone.
    However, as it is only Abigail who says this, it is possible that we instead start to judge Abigail for insulting a character that we have not been introduced to yet.
    This is further supported when Proctor defends Elizabeth from Abigail's insults; The fact that he says 'You'll... Elizabeth' suggests that he believes Elizabeth to be a better person than Abigail, because he implies through the use of the word 'nothing' that Abigail is unworthy to point out Elizabeth's faults.
    This suggests that Proctor reveres Elizabeth. We later learn in the act that Proctor does not seek to conform, just to do what he believes is right, as shown when he defends his decision not to go to Church due to Parris preaching only about 'hellfire' and 'damnation'; We realize that Proctor is a strong person, so the fact that he speaks of Elizabeth so highly suggests that she is a good person.
    However, as we already know of Proctor's affair, it is possible that he is seeking redemption, which he can do get through Elizabeth's forgiveness. This means he speaks so highly of Elizabeth so that he may be worthy in her eyes, which is inferred by the audience when he tells Mary Warren 'That goodness will not die for me'. The fact that Elizabeth is referred to as 'goodness' implies that Elizabeth is a blessing to those around her, and that she is worth more than John, because she must not die for him. By using the word 'me' Miller amalgamates all of John into a single word - 'me' refers to his affair, which is the root cause of Abigail charging murder on Elizabeth- Miller presents John as something that is rotten to the core; Elizabeth makes John a better person.
    Elizabeth is presented as perceptive, yet slightly too judgmental. She alone realizes that in any bed, 'Spoke or silent, a promise is surely made'. The word promise suggests a personal vow, made in bed, is an intimate promise that is made even if it is not said. This gives the quote the meaning that John has promised something to Abigail - his heart- by not saying anything. This implies that Elizabeth thinks that John has made this promise willingly, as suggested when she says that 'She has an arrow in you yet, John Proctor'. An arrow is usually associated with weaponry, but also with Cupid, the cherub/God Of Love. By using 'arrow', Miller implies that Elizabeth is highly perceptive, as she thinks that Abigail has a weapon against John.
    However, the connotations of love and desire that are also implied suggests that Elizabeth judges John too quickly- she does not trust him properly.
    In Act 4, Elizabeth is presented as repentant toward her own misdeeds, as shown when she tells John that 'it needs.. lechery'. By using the word 'cold', Miller links back to Abigail's initial description of Elizabeth. This parallel suggests that Elizabeth is repentant toward her actions. However, it could also suggest that Elizabeth and Abigail are more alike than we initially thought; The only difference is Elizabeth has John, and a sense of justice, not a sense of self-entitlement.
    Miller presents Elizabeth as an aloof person initially, but also suggests that she is a good person. She is shown to be perceptive, yet slightly too judgmental. The use of the word 'cold' in Act 4 links back to Abigail's in Act 1, which implies the two are more alike than we first thought.


    Could you please give me some feedback? Any help is appreciated :grin:
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    (Original post by AZ786)
    And me!! i think you just need to read it through a couple of times, pick out any language techniques, comment on structure (rhyme scheme or lack of it, rhythm etc.) then just make lots of stuff up on why they used a simile or whatever :P Make sure as an intro you write what the poem is about/purpose, then link everything to that
    Thank you! I can't do that, I feel a bit better about it now
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    I know this may seem like a silly question, but tomorrow is the exploring modern texts right?
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    (Original post by Jack59)
    You'll be given a passage that features a character or setting. You will have to analyse that and talk about the character or setting.

    Then part B normally relates to the character in the passage, but asks you to talk about a theme. Eg. The American dream - Or you may be asked to talk about people with disabilities, how some characters are isolated. etc.
    Aaaah, I thought I understood it
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    Anyone doing Purple Hibiscus/An Inspector Calls?
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    (Original post by Farhan96)
    Have you done one for Eric?
    Yes

    How do you respond to Eric in the play An Inspector Calls? How does Priestley make you respond as you do by the way he writes?

    PLAN
    Eric uneasy presence creates most of tension at beginning
    Position on table by himself “downstage” indicates his separation from family
    Revelation last in book; last to be considered
    Actual son of Mr Birling, who prefers Gerald
    “hate these fat old tarts…”

    From the outset of the play Priestley presents Eric as the source of tension within the Birling family, describing him as “not quite as ease” in direct contrast to Sheila, who is “very pleased with life and rather excited”. Eric “suddenly guffaws” as his first contribution to the play; breaking up the flow of the previous conversation rather than maintaining it. Priestley here immediately demonstrates Eric’s existence on the periphery of his own family, further demonstrated by his placement “downstage” and by himself on that side of the dining table.

    The consistent theme at the beginning of Act One is of Mr Birling making long-winded, elaborate speeches, and predicting things such as the Titanic being “unsinkable”, and that Russia “will always be behindhand naturally”. The dramatic irony arising from these false predictions, along with Eric’s uneasy presence, speaking entirely in one line utterances which are generally made to seem unwelcome (“don’t be an ass, Eric”) or simply ignored, both contribute to a feeling of uneasiness even within the family celebration. Priestley suggests a “pink and intimate” lighting for this part of the play, but this merely hints at a reference to ‘rose tinted spectacles’, and this becomes apparent with the arrival of the Inspector.

    It is structurally interesting that Priestley should choose to place Eric’s revelation at the end of the play, by itself in Act Three; he further emphasises Eric’s status as an outcast from his family, and suggests that Eric is always last to be considered by his family (emphatically demonstrated by Mrs Birling’s failure to see Eric’s involvement at the end of Act Two).

    Worse than the relationship between Eric and Mrs Birling is the former’s relationship with his own father; Priestley chooses to present Gerald somewhat as the son that Mr Birling wishes he had instead. In Act One Gerald is always quick to agree with Mr Birling’s opinions (“I believe you’re right, sir”), whereas Eric is more prone to clash with his father (“I’d have let her stay” – “Unless you brighten your ideas, you’ll never be in a position to let anybody stay … It’s about time you learnt to face a few responsibilities”).

    Priestley emphatically reinforces the breakdown in the relationship between Eric and his father, when Eric tells Mr Birling that he’s “not the kind of father a chap can turn to when he’s in trouble”. He later goes on to say, “I’m old enough to be married … and I’m not … and I hate these fat old tarts round the town – the ones I see some of your respectable friends with”. Priestley uses “old enough” in order to suggest Eric’s resentment at Mr Birling still treating him like a child, and the lack of euphemism in “fat old tarts” demonstrates Eric’s adulthood and lack of naivety. The sarcasm in “respectable friends” then suggests Eric’s opinions of his father; that he thinks he keeps good company, but Eric belittles him by handing him the revelation that they regularly sleep with prostitutes. Priestley uses Eric to taint Mr Birling with the same crime as Mrs Birling, that of pretending to be something they are not.
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    (Original post by Heskey123)
    Anyone doing Purple Hibiscus/An Inspector Calls?
    I am doing An Inspector Calls.
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    (Original post by longlivelatifa)
    Could someone possibly give me feedback on these two paragraphs I wrote about Slim (Of Mice and Men). I didn't have a particular question but something about his importance in relation to the context?

    Another reason Slim is extremely important is because he shows loyalty and is a good friend. He gives advice ‘You know what to do…. Take a shovel’. He reassured George that he did the right thing at the end, ‘you hadda George, I swear you hadda’. He comforted George the time he most needed it and this shows what a true friend he was. Also, at one point in the novel Steinbeck said he ‘moved back slightly so the light was not on his face’ (43), In contrast to Curley’s wife who when first entering she cut off the ‘rectangular of sunshine in the doorway’ (34). If the light was to be represented as dreams here, Curley’s wife would be seen to have interfered with George and Lennie’s dream, which she did as she stopped them getting it. This foreshadowed that she would prevent them from reaching it however Slim moved out of the way of the light, and this may suggest that he wanted them to reach the dream; he supported them in their quest to get the American dream. This showed the qualities of a good friend. On a secondary level, It may also suggest that he was humble and did not like the spotlight on him, but all these qualities enhances the idea that he is the perfect being.

    Slim is the voice for justice within the novel. His word was ‘taken on any subject, be it politics or love’. This shows that he was that wise and all the other ranch workers looked up to him as a role model and accepted whatever he had said. He is like a father figure to all the ranch men with his words of wisdom being the words they live by. But Slim also represented hope within the novel. Steinbeck made him a character who didn’t ignore Curley’s wife and wasn’t sexist as he responded to her saying ‘Hi good lookin’. He is someone that didn’t fear being contaminated by Crooks and went into his bunk. He didn’t refer to Crooks as ‘nigger’ but said ‘’Oh! Hello, Crooks’ and therefore he wasn’t bound by the casual racism in society. He offered Candy his ‘pups’ when Carlson shot his dog, showing he wasn’t insensitive and he was very understanding; he held a level of respect to the elderly. And finally, he wasn’t someone bound by the social hierarchy; he gained his respect through having an ear that ‘heard more than what was said to him’. His understanding is why people were attracted to him, and unlike Curley he didn’t have to start a fight to prove his strength and power. So despite not being the Boss’s son, he held more power as he could threaten Curley and address his wife, without fear of being hurt by Curley. Slim was Steinbeck’s representation of what a perfect society would be like had everyone behaved like him. For this reason we get the sense that people like Slim didn’t exist in such a cold, harsh world. His character seems to be somebody far beyond the realms of reality and therefore the unrealistic qualities portrayed by Steinbeck could be part of his depressing message, insinuating that no one will ever be like that and therefore we will always be stuck in this endless cycle of having hope then having it ruined.

    Sorry for any mistakes, thank you!
    I would give that a high C.
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    (Original post by longlivelatifa)
    Could someone possibly give me feedback on these two paragraphs I wrote about Slim (Of Mice and Men). I didn't have a particular question but something about his importance in relation to the context?

    Another reason Slim is extremely important is because he shows loyalty and is a good friend. He gives advice ‘You know what to do…. Take a shovel’. He reassured George that he did the right thing at the end, ‘you hadda George, I swear you hadda’. He comforted George the time he most needed it and this shows what a true friend he was. YOu need to exand on this point...

    Another method steibeck uses to convey slims godd-willed character is when (not at one point - sounds basic)he ‘moved back slightly so the light was not on his face’ (43), In contrast to Curley’s wife who when first entering she cut off the ‘rectangular of sunshine in the doorway’ (34).(nice link)
    There is a stark contrast in the actions of characters and the figurative effect of light, which help steibeck convey personality traits of these characters e.g. if the light was to be represented as dreams. (not required - here)
    Curley’s wife would be seen to have interfered with George and Lennie’s dream, which she did as she stopped them getting it. This foreshadowed that she would prevent them from reaching it however Slim moved out of the way of the light, and this may suggest that he wanted them to reach the dream; he supported them in their quest to get the American dream. This showed the qualities of a good friend. < this point could be written better and elaborated on further since its hard to geet the meaning out of it

    Another poignant connotation suggested via light to describe the personality traights of these 2 charcters (instead of - On a secondary level),...... It may also suggest that he was humble and did not like the spotlight on him, but all these qualities enhances the idea that he is the perfect being. < this is just a point... no elaboration is here

    Slim is the voice for justice within the novel. His word was ‘taken on any subject, be it politics or love’. This shows that he was that wise and all the other ranch workers looked up to him as a role model and accepted whatever he had said. He is like a father figure to all the ranch men with his words of wisdom being the words they live by. But Slim also represented hope within the novel. Steinbeck made him a character who didn’t ignore Curley’s wife and wasn’t sexist as he responded to her saying ‘Hi good lookin’. He is someone that didn’t fear being contaminated by Crooks and went into his bunk. He didn’t refer to Crooks as ‘nigger’ but said ‘’Oh! Hello, Crooks’ and therefore he wasn’t bound by the casual racism in society. He offered Candy his ‘pups’ when Carlson shot his dog, showing he wasn’t insensitive and he was very understanding; he held a level of respect to the elderly. And finally, he wasn’t someone bound by the social hierarchy; he gained his respect through having an ear that ‘heard more than what was said to him’. His understanding is why people were attracted to him, and unlike Curley he didn’t have to start a fight to prove his strength and power. So despite not being the Boss’s son, he held more power as he could threaten Curley and address his wife, without fear of being hurt by Curley. Slim was Steinbeck’s representation of what a perfect society would be like had everyone behaved like him. For this reason we get the sense that people like Slim didn’t exist in such a cold, harsh world. His character seems to be somebody far beyond the realms of reality and therefore the unrealistic qualities portrayed by Steinbeck could be part of his depressing message, insinuating that no one will ever be like that and therefore we will always be stuck in this endless cycle of having hope then having it ruined.
    ^^^ this bit is really good!!
    thats just s few suggestions...

    hope it helps

    ryan
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    I'm doing purple Hib and an inspector calls
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    Was JB Priestley a christian?
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    I have my English Literature Poetry exam tomorrow, and I have been revising as many poems and techniques as I can, but would just like some more advice on which poems have a more likelihood of coming up, and also if anyone knows any good sites for how to analyse techniques such as Caesura, Hyperbole, Iambic Pentameter and other techniques. (This for the higher paper tomorrow) thanks (:


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    (Original post by ryanb97)
    thats just s few suggestions...

    hope it helps

    ryan
    How would you structure your essay on OMAM?
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    Guys I am so screwed for this, can anyone tell me the technique needed to write because my teacher is useless, i mean how to structure paragraphs etc... thanks
    btw I am doing to kill a mockingbird and inspector calls
 
 
 
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