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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)

    Well done to the MPs.
    I read that as MP3's :getmecoat:
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      (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
      With rights come responsibilities - break the law, lose your right to chose who makes those laws.
      Unless you are a lord, in which case break the law and you can go back to writing laws without any problems.
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      (Original post by lekky)
      doing MILE atm. Where you get assignment 9am thursday, hand it in 9am friday. its hellish. It wouldn't be so bad but the word limit is 500 so you have to ****ing condense, I have about three tables which I'll probably get marked down for, and critique all references, and then IF THIS WASNT ENOUGH you can't print it and hand it in, oh no! you have to write it out in a booklet! WHY is anyones guess! And yes that means all diagrams hand drawn! literally been working since 9:30ish with 1 hr for lunch, just got home, still got loads to do, probably at least 3-4 hours worth (in writing it out, daigrams etc) but having a break now!

      though it's about the ear, I have an ENT appt next week about my hearing so it's quite useful, on balance not hearing but yeah still. handy.

      ps. 4 cans of coke so far today.
      24hrs for 500 words doesnt sound too bad? what detail level are we talking?
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      (Original post by John Locke)
      24hrs for 500 words doesnt sound too bad? what detail level are we talking?
      As much as you can for 500 which isn't much. It's not the doing writing it thats the hard part its the getting the information in the word count, figuring out what to include for the start, figuring out what questions, finding enough resources, analysing the resources (resources etc not included in word count) and then ****ing handwriting it all out and handdrawing diagrams. The first part took me probably 7ish hours. Handwriting it all out is taking for-****ing-ever.

      This is what we were given:

      Twenty two year old John woke up feeling dizzy and nauseus. he could not get up as 'the walls seemed to be moving around'. The GP came on a house call and checked John's ears and asked if he had had a recent cold or flu-type illness.
      Yeah.

      Bare in mind we have 0 knowledge on this.

      Maybe it doesn't sound as hard or as time consuming as it is, but honestly, F-M-L.
      I guess it's not hard apart from being time consuming once you've worked out what to do. I'm just tired and fed up and want to go to bed!

      Edit: my whole report is 2,300 words.
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      Is there a way I can work out how much grant/loan I'll be entitled to in my final two years?

      I'm trying to work out whether I should take out the student loan I'm entitled to this year if I'm going to get nothing in the last two years.

      The only problem being the more money in my account the less bursary I'll get - so there'll be a trade off somewhere...
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      (Original post by lekky)

      This is what we were given:



      Yeah.

      Bare in mind we have 0 knowledge on this.

      Maybe it doesn't sound as hard or as time consuming as it is, but honestly, F-M-L.
      I guess it's not hard apart from being time consuming once you've worked out what to do. I'm just tired and fed up and want to go to bed!

      Edit: my whole report is 2,300 words.
      What a flawed scenario - as if a GP would do a home visit for a 22 year old!
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      I'm pondering private healthcare insurance issues...
      & wondering about a range of opinions so stuck it in the main subforum - but would especially welcome Drs/Current Medics!



      http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...0#post29822930
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      Any words of encouragement or advice for a fourth year whose enthusiasm is flagging and is already terrified by fourth year finals? :afraid:

      Otherwise, it's all going great! :teeth:
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      (Original post by Demon_AS)
      Any words of encouragement or advice for a fourth year whose enthusiasm is flagging and is already terrified by fourth year finals? :afraid:

      Otherwise, it's all going great! :teeth:
      I've never felt so unmotivated in my life.
      And it's not even because I'm bored.

      I just think as I'm getting older I'm getting numb to exam/project panic, as you know in the back of your mind the world isn't going to end even if you failed it completely
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      (Original post by Philosoraptor)
      I've never felt so unmotivated in my life.
      And it's not even because I'm bored.

      I just think as I'm getting older I'm getting numb to exam/project panic, as you know in the back of your mind the world isn't going to end even if you failed it completely
      Exactly. Not that I want to fail, of course.

      It's not even that I dislike medicine - I still love it and can picture nothing else that I would want to do.

      I think it's just exhaustion :sad:.
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      (Original post by Demon_AS)
      I think it's just exhaustion :sad:.
      Just you wait.
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      (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
      With rights come responsibilities - break the law, lose your right to chose who makes those laws.
      I broke the law and got a speeding ticket - should I lose the right to vote?
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      (Original post by Captain Crash)
      I broke the law and got a speeding ticket - should I lose the right to vote?
      Well if you see my point above - if your crime is considered so bad that you must be sectioned off from society then you should lose your right to vote - speeding isn't considered that.

      Just how if you commit theft and pay a £200 fine and that's the end of it, you can still vote...

      It's only those in gaol.
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      (Original post by Philosoraptor)
      Well if you see my point above - if your crime is considered so bad that you must be sectioned off from society then you should lose your right to vote - speeding isn't considered that.

      Just how if you commit theft and pay a £200 fine and that's the end of it, you can still vote...

      It's only those in gaol.
      I was merely pointing out that breaking the law =/= losing the right to vote

      In any case what purpose does removing the vote serve? To take away a right such the right to vote, you have to have a damn good reason.

      In general I believe prison has three functions
      1) To punish the criminal, and thereby deter others
      2) To protect the public from future actions of the prisoner
      3) To rehabilitate prisoners into productive members of society.

      Things like removing prisoners liberty have a clear goal - namely to fulfil objectives 1 and 2.

      However removing the right to vote doesn't do 1 or 2 and keeping the vote would be an integral part of 3
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      (Original post by Captain Crash)
      I was merely pointing out that breaking the law =/= losing the right to vote

      In any case what purpose does removing the vote serve? To take away a right such the right to vote, you have to have a damn good reason.

      In general I believe prison has three functions
      1) To punish the criminal, and thereby deter others
      2) To protect the public from future actions of the prisoner
      3) To rehabilitate prisoners into productive members of society.

      Things like removing prisoners liberty have a clear goal - namely to fulfil objectives 1 and 2.

      However removing the right to vote doesn't do 1 or 2 and keeping the vote would be an integral part of 3
      This is obviously an issue without a "right" or "wrong" answer.

      It's going to be down to opinion.

      But mine would be is, whilst your considered such that you shouldn't partake in normal society, nor should you have any bearing on the daily running of the country.

      Again it's subjective and there are arguments on both sides.

      Maybe you're just ahead of your time
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      Hmmm my thoughts on the matter

      1) If you did allow it, then you may have MPs trying to attract the "prisoner's vote", meaning that certain things may be changed and not for the better (if this makes any sense at all)
      2) Maybe you should be allowed to vote if you will be released into society during the PM's current term. So if you're in prison for 15 years, then you will not experience the society and policies voted for during your 5th year of imprisonment, so you shouldn't vote. If you're in for a 10 year stretch and you're in your 10th year, then it makes sense for them to vote, as they'll be released into society during the current term that they voted for.


      I have no idea if any of this makes sense outside of my own head :dontknow:
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      Are adrenergic receptors a class of metabotropic receptor?
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      (Original post by Woody.)
      Are adrenergic receptors a class of metabotropic receptor?
      :yep:
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      (Original post by Woody.)
      Are adrenergic receptors a class of metabotropic receptor?
      Well they're not ligand gate ion channels, so yes, yes they are.

      Metabotropic is just a receptor that's plonked on the outside in my mind (connected via G proteins or whatever), i.e. not with an ion channel.
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      (Original post by Kinkerz)
      :yep:
      Right, thanks for the clarification! So there are ionotropic receptors and metabotropic receptors (the main divisions?) which then branch into other segments, like adrenergic receptors? Am I right in thinking that cholinergic receptors are split into nicotinic (ionotropic?) and muscarinic (metabotropic?). Is there anything else receptor wise that murks the waters?

      (Original post by Philosoraptor)
      Well they're not ligand gate ion channels, so yes, yes they are.

      Metabotropic is just a receptor that's plonked on the outside in my mind (connected via G proteins or whatever), i.e. not with an ion channel.
      So a 'ligand-gated ion channel receptor' is synonymous with 'ionotropic receptor'?
     
     
     
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