Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arminb)
    I really cant resist. I want to call them and ask the how i should take the five week email and whether that means i am very competitive applicant and my chances of being made an offer is high or is it just something that majority of applicants received. Do you think its weird if I do?! has anyone already contacted them regarding this ?!
    Some people have gotten rejections after the 2 week e-mail so it does certainly mean that you have a shot of getting an offer.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arminb)
    I really cant resist. I want to call them and ask the how i should take the five week email and whether that means i am very competitive applicant and my chances of being made an offer is high or is it just something that majority of applicants received. Do you think its weird if I do?! has anyone already contacted them regarding this ?!
    I applied for EME. I got the 5 weeks mail but my friend didn't .

    PS: He has better AS results and with a impressive STEP result. I don't even have STEP.

    So I think 5 weeks mail shows nothing or just mean that u r lucky? ;(


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,
    I have two questions,
    The first is that I have applied 4 days ago and only received the acknowledgement email(12 weeks) is that normal? How long do I have to wait for the 2 week one?
    Second question is to do with my English igcse grade. It's the only flaw in my application and I got a C ( first language) but I got an 8 on my ielts. How much of a disadvantage do you think l'll be at?
    Thank you


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kaufman)
    I applied for EME. I got the 5 weeks mail but my friend didn't .

    PS: He has better AS results and with a impressive STEP result. I don't even have STEP.

    So I think 5 weeks mail shows nothing or just mean that u r lucky? ;(


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    As in he got rejected or he just didn't get the e-mail? I wouldn't call it the end if you don't receive the 5 week e-mail.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Any 5 week emails for Philosophy and economics applicants? (or philosophy dept in general?)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Just wondering if anyone has an idea why Economic History is only AAB? Predicted A*AA for A2 so I was just wondering whether this will make my application placed in better stead because I exceed the requirements quite a bit, and it will probably be my firm choice (If I get an offer, PLEASE) even though it's the lowest entry req

    Thanks
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thinkthings)
    Ooh, I wasn't aware LSE published acceptance rates. Are these statistics posted somewhere on LSE's websites?
    The 2012 acceptance rate is on the first web page of every undergraduate course....

    Did you really apply for LSE without even checking the course outline?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dilzo999)
    As in he got rejected or he just didn't get the e-mail? I wouldn't call it the end if you don't receive the 5 week e-mail.
    rejected


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ErHi?)
    You're basically spot on!

    You'll get a confirmation email, and the admissions tutor will introduce themselves (kinda)
    Then you should get the 2 week email where it just says you'll be updated in approximately two weeks on the status of your application

    HOPEFULLY, you should get the 5 week email (however, some people have been rejected after the 2 week email) which says:

    "The Selector will be making further academic assessments on your qualifications and personal statement, and will be considering your application in competition with other candidates in your cohort.

    This can take up to five weeks. I will be in touch at the end of this process to let you know what happens next."

    Now, I don't think anyone on this thread has gotten further than that at the moment, but some people have been rejected after getting the 5 week email so we're all still in the dark a bit.

    Hope it helped
    just to be cclear...people have gotten 2 week email, then the 5 week email, and then some time after this 5 week email have been rejected? Or is it tht they got 2 week email...then were rejected after 2 weeks (by 5 week email stage, but not having received the email)?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IceKidd)
    just to be cclear...people have gotten 2 week email, then the 5 week email, and then some time after this 5 week email have been rejected? Or is it tht they got 2 week email...then were rejected after 2 weeks (by 5 week email stage, but not having received the email)?
    Both haha, some people have been rejected after receiving the 5 week email, and others have been rejected before receiving the 5 week one!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kaufman)
    I applied for EME. I got the 5 weeks mail but my friend didn't .

    PS: He has better AS results and with a impressive STEP result. I don't even have STEP.

    So I think 5 weeks mail shows nothing or just mean that u r lucky? ;(


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    what is EME. and what was his STEP result (what mark/grade and in paper I , II or III)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ErHi?)
    Both haha, some people have been rejected after receiving the 5 week email, and others have been rejected before receiving the 5 week one!
    hmm its been nearly 2 weeks since i got the 5 week email, i hope thats a good sign
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IceKidd)
    hmm its been nearly 2 weeks since i got the 5 week email, i hope thats a good sign
    Of course that's a good sign!! I reckon if you were weak you would have been rejected a few days after receiving the 5 week email! The fact you're further into the assessment indicates you're strong. I wish you the absolute best of luck, LSE is an amazing university to study at
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scottface)
    The 2012 acceptance rate is on the first web page of every undergraduate course....

    Did you really apply for LSE without even checking the course outline?
    You seem like a really nice and friendly fellow. Of course I checked the course outline and I've just checked it again but I still don't see the acceptance rate published anywhere. I must be really daft if you see it and everyone else does. Not to worry though - if I am, LSE won't offer me a place.

    All I see are figures for applications per place and not acceptance rate. The figures published on the first page of every undergraduate course are merely the the number of applications and the number of places (which they sometimes label as 'first year students' - it differs from web page to web page but the numbers remain the same) available for the 2012 admissions year. That is not the same thing as the 2012 acceptance rate. Sure, those figures are helpful in telling us the number of applicants for the 2012 admissions year and how many places were ultimately available in the 2012 admissions year. Again, these figures are merely applications per place and not acceptance rate. Those figures don't reflect how many of the thousands of applications the LSE actually accepted by giving conditional or unconditional offers. For all we know, the LSE might have accepted 10 applications per available place. For instance, for law, they might have 186 open places for the incoming year. However, they might choose to accept 2 or 3 or 4 or 5 applications per place in case some students choose not to attend LSE or don't meet LSE's conditional offer. I, along with others, have searched the website and I don't think LSE publishes these figures anywhere.

    I am applying to study law - this is LSE's LLB Bachelor of Laws page and this is their Department of Law page. Feel free to point to me exactly where the acceptance rate is for my subject, since you claim that the 2012 acceptance rate is on the first web page of every undergraduate course. As you know, I don't see it anywhere, nor do I see it for any other subject. All I see is that for law, in 2012, there were 2,338 applications for 186 places that year. That's it. If you can show me where the acceptance rate is, I of course, stand corrected and my deepest and utmost apologies to you.

    Incidentally, what are you applying for? I hope it isn't maths or statistics related.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thinkthings)
    You seem like a really nice and friendly fellow. Of course I checked the course outline and I've just checked it again but I still don't see the acceptance rate published anywhere. I must be really daft if you see it and everyone else does. Not to worry though - if I am, LSE won't offer me a place.

    All I see are figures for applications per place and not acceptance rate. The figures published on the first page of every undergraduate course are merely the the number of applications and the number of places (which they sometimes label as 'first year students' - it differs from web page to web page but the numbers remain the same) available for the 2012 admissions year. That is not the same thing as the 2012 acceptance rate. Sure, those figures are helpful in telling us the number of applicants for the 2012 admissions year and how many places were ultimately available in the 2012 admissions year. Again, these figures are merely applications per place and not acceptance rate. Those figures don't reflect how many of the thousands of applications the LSE actually accepted by giving conditional or unconditional offers. For all we know, the LSE might have accepted 10 applications per available place. For instance, for law, they might have 186 open places for the incoming year. However, they might choose to accept 2 or 3 or 4 or 5 applications per place in case some students choose not to attend LSE or don't meet LSE's conditional offer. I, along with others, have searched the website and I don't think LSE publishes these figures anywhere.

    I am applying to study law - this is LSE's LLB Bachelor of Laws page and this is their Department of Law page. Feel free to point to me exactly where the acceptance rate is for my subject, since you claim that the 2012 acceptance rate is on the first web page of every undergraduate course. As you know, I don't see it anywhere, nor do I see it for any other subject. All I see is that for law, in 2012, there were 2,338 applications for 186 places that year. That's it. If you can show me where the acceptance rate is, I of course, stand corrected and my deepest and utmost apologies to you.

    Incidentally, what are you applying for? I hope it isn't maths or statistics related.
    Hmmm.... So your understanding of acceptance rate would be -
    (Offers less those declined)/ Total applications

    My understanding of acceptance is that it is when a student 'accepts' an offer from LSE and as such enters the course. This is a fairly popular interpretation of the term (for example here).

    There is also a TSR thread here which provides an excel document explicitly outlining what I thought would be an obvious interpretation of the acceptance rate:

    [Acceptance Rate]: this is number of people who were accepted and enrolled (above number) vs. the total number of applications made in the [course] - in the university selected.


    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scottface)
    Hmmm.... So your understanding of acceptance rate would be -
    (Offers less those declined)/ Total applications

    My understanding of acceptance is that it is when a student 'accepts' an offer from LSE and as such enters the course. This is a fairly popular interpretation of the term (for example here).

    There is also a TSR thread here which provides an excel document explicitly outlining what I thought would be an obvious interpretation of the acceptance rate:

    [Acceptance Rate]: this is number of people who were accepted and enrolled (above number) vs. the total number of applications made in the [course] - in the university selected.

    All your links point to the same source. Nonetheless, yes, your concept of acceptance rate is different to mine and certainly different to what I am quite sure is the conventional understand of acceptance rates elsewhere in the world. I don't think it's just 'my' understanding of acceptance rate. In fact, I would argue that your understanding of acceptance rate is not at all the obvious interpretation of it.

    Why would prospective applicants be interested in how many students accepted and enrolled in the university? Sure, that's an interesting figure to know. But I would bet that they (and you and StudioBagel and every student on TSR) are much more interested in how many offers and acceptances the university made in their subject versus the total number of applications so that they can gauge their chance of getting in that institution. People on TSR are always asking 'what are my chances of getting in?" and statistically speaking, this is based on the university's acceptance rate - that is, how many acceptances the university makes altogether/ total number of applications. The number of students who accept and enroll in an institution is not at all helpful.

    In the United States and elsewhere I believe, acceptance rate exactly what I said above: it is is how many applications the university accepts altogether/ total number of applications. See this article: "College acceptance rates: how many get in?" or See this article.

    What you are talking about - that is, your concept of acceptance rate (the number of people who are accepted and consequently enroll/total no. applications) is actually known as 'yield rate' or 'enrollment rate'. Here, in this page, you can see for instance, that for Harvard University in 2011-2012, they had a total of 34,950 applications, 2,188 were admitted, thus making their acceptance rate 6.3%. Their yield rate, however, the rate of people who consequently chose to attend Harvard University, was 75.9%.

    Based on this understanding of acceptance rate, the figures that LSE does publish are again, as I stated, merely number of applicants per place. They don't publish the acceptance rate for any of their subjects, which is why I was curious about where Studiobagel (and I guess you as well) got your acceptance rates from. As far as I'm aware, LSE does not publish acceptance rates (based on the definition I have outlined).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thinkthings)
    All your links point to the same source. Nonetheless, yes, your concept of acceptance rate is different to mine and certainly different to what I am quite sure is the conventional understand of acceptance rates elsewhere in the world. I don't think it's just 'my' understanding of acceptance rate. In fact, I would argue that your understanding of acceptance rate is not at all the obvious interpretation of it.

    Why would prospective applicants be interested in how many students accepted and enrolled in the university? Sure, that's an interesting figure to know. But I would bet that they (and you and StudioBagel and every student on TSR) are much more interested in how many offers and acceptances the university made in their subject versus the total number of applications so that they can gauge their chance of getting in that institution. People on TSR are always asking 'what are my chances of getting in?" and statistically speaking, this is based on the university's acceptance rate - that is, how many acceptances the university makes altogether/ total number of applications. The number of students who accept and enroll in an institution is not at all helpful.

    In the United States and elsewhere I believe, acceptance rate exactly what I said above: it is is how many applications the university accepts altogether/ total number of applications. See this article: "College acceptance rates: how many get in?" or See this article.

    What you are talking about - that is, your concept of acceptance rate (the number of people who are accepted and consequently enroll/total no. applications) is actually known as 'yield rate' or 'enrollment rate'. Here, in this page, you can see for instance, that for Harvard University in 2011-2012, they had a total of 34,950 applications, 2,188 were admitted, thus making their acceptance rate 6.3%. Their yield rate, however, the rate of people who consequently chose to attend Harvard University, was 75.9%. In this article, you can see that the University of Virginia is worried about their low yield rate compared to other universities.

    Based on this understanding of acceptance rate, the figures that LSE does publish are again, as I stated, merely number of applicants per place. They don't publish the acceptance rate for any of their subjects, which is why I was curious about where Studiobagel (and I guess you as well) got your acceptance rates from. As far as I'm aware, LSE does not publish acceptance rates (based on the definition I have outlined).
    My Bad - TSR thread here http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1817633

    I agree the statistic is not much to go off, however it is not like admission into uni is a blind roll of chance (at least I hope not!). Realistically any rate isn't going to tell you much unless you have a statistic which also takes into account your academic performance, co-curricular merit etc...

    Also, even if only 50% of students accepted their LLB offer, that would only be a rough 8% improvement in 'acceptance' rate. Really using either statistic we won't be able to know our 'chances'.

    I think my understanding of the UK admission process (I'm Australian) must also be totally off. Will LSE literally give out more offers then they have places initially?

    I thought they would give out as many offers as they had places, then as any offers are rejected send out additional ones to those that are pooled.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scottface)
    My Bad - TSR thread here http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1817633

    I agree the statistic is not much to go off, however it is not like admission into uni is a blind roll of chance (at least I hope not!). Realistically any rate isn't going to tell you much unless you have a statistic which also takes into account your academic performance, co-curricular merit etc...

    Also, even if only 50% of students accepted their LLB offer, that would only be a rough 8% improvement in chances. Really using either statistic we won't be able to know our 'chances'.

    I think my understanding of the UK admission process (I'm Australian) must also be totally off. Will LSE literally give out more offers then they have places initially?

    I thought they would give out as many offers as they had places, then as any offers are rejected send out addition ones to those that are pooled.
    Yeah mate, no worries about the link : ) And yes, I definitely agree that statistics is not much to go off on and that there are so many contextual factors that statistics do not capture but I was just pointing that out for people like StudioBagel who are asking about their chances statistically speaking (as he did here).

    No worries, I'm American so I don't know very much about the admissions process either. But yes, I am quite positive LSE will give out more offers per place for at least some, if not most subjects. They have to account for those students who put other institutions as their firm choice and LSE as their insurance choice or for those students who might not make the grade requirements that LSE has offered. I think what you said about the pooling system - I'm not very sure when it comes to LSE All I know is that students have until May to decide whether or not to reject offers or put LSE as their insurance/firm so LSE can't just wait to see what students will do with their offers before sending out additional ones - they send them all out usually by early April.

    From past threads, you can see discussions about it here or here, for instance. About 2.5 offers/place seems to be the unofficial consensus but that number has not been verified by LSE and as far as I'm aware, LSE hasn't published that figure (though I'm always on the lookout for it and LSE's acceptance rate...). Plus, I'm sure offers/place differs from subject to subject. Perhaps it depends on how popular that subject is, how competitive is, historical performance of students (e.g. if students usually fail to make the grades that LSE wants, LSE might offer more applicants per place) or other factors.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thinkthings)
    Yeah mate, no worries about the link : ) And yes, I definitely agree that statistics is not much to go off on and that there are so many contextual factors that statistics do not capture but I was just pointing that out for people like StudioBagel who are asking about their chances statistically speaking (as he did here).

    No worries, I'm American so I don't know very much about the admissions process either. But yes, I am quite positive LSE will give out more offers per place for at least some, if not most subjects. They have to account for those students who put other institutions as their firm choice and LSE as their insurance choice or for those students who might not make the grade requirements that LSE has offered. I think what you said about the pooling system - I'm not very sure when it comes to LSE All I know is that students have until May to decide whether or not to reject offers or put LSE as their insurance/firm so LSE can't just wait to see what students will do with their offers before sending out additional ones - they send them all out usually by early April.

    From past threads, you can see discussions about it here or here, for instance. About 2.5 offers/place seems to be the unofficial consensus but that number has not been verified by LSE and as far as I'm aware, LSE hasn't published that figure (though I'm always on the lookout for it and LSE's acceptance rate...). Plus, I'm sure offers/place differs from subject to subject. Perhaps it depends on how popular that subject is, how competitive is, historical performance of students (e.g. if students usually fail to make the grades that LSE wants, LSE might offer more applicants per place) or other factors.
    Yeh given that they don't publish the yield I can only assume that for most subjects it is fairly low, probably because most will still chose Oxbridge over LSE.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kaufman)
    rejected


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Damn, although LSE are unpredictable, they reject people with all A* yet take in people with A's so still have hope .
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.