The Italian Football Thread Watch

Strange Fruittt
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#1061
Report 4 years ago
#1061
Hypocrisy undeniably tinged with racism, in Italy

who'd have ****ing thought it ! :rolleyes:!

****ing *****

if I wasn't on a hipster nihilist cycle it would make my blood boil lol, utter *****

****ing disgrace Italian football is.

Guardian article;
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Another town, another team, yet another fresh start for Mario Balotelli. Less than a week after completing a £16m move from Milan, the Italy striker is expected to make his Liverpool debut on Sunday lunchtime at White Hart Lane. The Reds will be his fourth club in the space of five years.Balotelli believes he has found an environment where he can thrive. He told reporters on Monday that he was happy to be back in England, that football in this country was “beautiful”, and that it had been a mistake for him ever to go back to Serie A. But in Italy, the press had a different take. They recalled how the player had returned enthusiastically to his home country just 19 months earlier, bemoaning Manchester’s weather and cuisine.
Milan had seemed like the perfect home for Balotelli at the time. He would be representing the club he supported as a boy, and living close to his friends and family in nearby Brescia. And yet, the honeymoon proved to be short-lived. Despite scoring 26 times in 43 league games, Balotelli cut an unhappy and isolated figure.
He wept on the bench during a defeat to Napoli in February, distraught at his failure to score a goal to dedicate to his daughter Pia – whose paternity he had just acknowledged following a DNA test. Two months later, Balotelli lost his cool during a post-match interview with Italy’s Sky Sport 24, telling the former Juventus midfielder Giancarlo Marocchi: “In my opinion, you don’t understand football.”
So when news broke of the player’s move to Liverpool last week, it was met with resignation on the peninsula, rather than any great surprise. More than one commentator wondered whether the player was destined to spend his entire career moving on from one place to another, always feeling dissatisfied. “He is condemned to chase a rainbow that he will never reach,” wrote Luigi Garlando in Gazzetta dello Sport. “He is Ulysses without Ithaca.”
But what else could the world expect of Balotelli, who grew up without the kind of cultural reference points that most of us take for granted?
Born in Palermo, Sicily to Ghanaian immigrants, Thomas and Rose Barwuah, in the summer of 1990, Balotelli was a sickly child whose intestinal problems made it hard for his biological parents to fully look after his needs. Placed in foster care with Francesco and Silvia Balotelli, a white couple from the affluent town of Concesio, just north of Brescia, he enjoyed a comfortable upbringing, and yet also one that led to endlessly challenging questions about the nature of his identity.
Although bureaucratic obstacles prevented the Balotellis from ever adopting Mario formally, they raised him as their own son, alongside their three biological children Giovanni, Corrado and Cristina. Each of them was treated him as part of the family, and Mario viewed them the same way. But in the overwhelmingly white environment of small-town northern Italy, Mario was also keenly aware that he did not look the same as his siblings or his peers at school.
Stories have been written claiming that Balotelli grew obsessed with the colour of his skin, either shading it in pink with pens or scrubbing his hands with boiling water in order to get them clean. In the book Io Vi Maledico (I Curse You), the Italian journalist Concita De Gregorio quotes one of the player’s former teachers, Tiziana Gatti, as saying that the player had an “evident identity problem” growing up.
“He asked me more than once if his heart, inside his chest, was also black,” Gatti adds in the book. “I explained that it wasn’t, but a few days later he asked me again.”
Balotelli’s relationship with his biological parents was complicated. The Barwuahs had moved to Brescia before agreeing to have him fostered, but despite living nearby they played only a peripheral role in his life. They have blamed the Balotelli family for this state of affairs, claiming that they were denied access to Mario – although that version of events has since been contested by the player.
Regardless of who is telling the truth, the situation can only have been unsettling for a young boy caught between two very different realities. Gatti claims that Balotelli would return from these brief visits with his biological family asking whether they would make him go back to live in Africa.
Football was an outlet, but sadly not an escape. Obsessed with the sport from a young age, Balotelli’s natural talent soon marked him apart in ways that were not always desirable. “His ability, combined with the colour of his skin, provoked a certain amount of jealousy and antipathy,” said the player’s first coach, Giovanni Valenti. “I think growing up, Balotelli went through a period when he felt he was not accepted, because he was black.”
Interactions with the opposite sex might have reinforced that idea. In his biography of Balotelli, Why Always Me, Frank Worrall quotes the player as saying: “Like all boys of a certain age, I was interested in girls and getting attention. But it was like I was transparent [invisible]. I’m no George Clooney but I couldn’t explain why I was ignored. My friends in Italy explained. They told me people don’t like blacks.”
On the pitch, Balotelli responded by refusing to celebrate his goals, instead walking quietly back to the halfway line. Valenti puts that behaviour down to the player’s desire not to draw any more attention to himself than he had already done simply by virtue of the colour of his skin.
Some things, though, you simply cannot hide from. For Balotelli, the ugly side of Italian football support was among them. He was racially abused during his first professional game, at the age of 15. He had required special dispensation just to take part, with directors at Lumezzane lodging a request to the Italian Football Federation to make the striker eligible to play for the senior team.
Entering his team’s match against Padova in Serie C1 – the third tier of Italian football – as a substitute, Balotelli immediately proceeded to nutmeg an opponent. He soon found himself on the wrong end of a brutal foul in retribution. But the striker sprung to his feet and continued. A section of the 3,643 strong crowd at the Stadio Euganeo responded by making monkey noises toward him at the end of the game. In a sense, Balotelli has already delivered the most eloquent message that he can to such people, going on to become one of his country’s foremost players. But even then, he has been made to feel like an outsider along the way.
Despite living his entire life in Italy, Balotelli was prevented by archaic legislation from claiming full citizenship until after he had turned 18. As a result, he was also prevented from representing any of the national youth teams until after that date. Even once he had finally overcome all the legislative hurdles and made his debut for the Azzurri, Balotelli was informed more than once by hostile crowds that “there are no black Italians”.
All of these stories provide some insight into the way that Balotelli carries himself today. If he behaves like an outsider, detached from his colleagues on and off the pitch, perhaps it is because that is how he has had to live his whole life – knowing that he is just a little different to everybody else. It might also explain why, at 24, he is still having such a hard time finding a place that he is happy to call home.
“Soon [Balotelli] will play alongside Steven Gerrard, a banner player who has been planted in the same place for 30 years: the heart of Liverpool,” Garlando continued in Gazzetta dello Sport.
“The mythical Kop will sing ‘You’ll never walk alone’ and yet Mario, incapable of laying down roots, further away still from his daughter and parents, will walk alone.”
That is one take on the situation. Another would be to say that Balotelli simply has not found the right place, the right club, the right manager to shake him out of established patterns of behaviour. Could Liverpool turn out to be the home he has been seeking?


Basically there are bigger things in this world to cry about and give a **** about, but Mario's personality is somewhat explained by the consistent racist undermining and hatred he's received.
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mojojojo101
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#1062
Report 4 years ago
#1062
(Original post by sevchenko)
The season barely started there's no form to judge lol. Even going on World performances can you honestly say Immobile, Marchisio, Candreva, Motta, Insigne, Darmian or Verratti performed better than Balo at the WC?

Granted it does look like he lacks a bit of match fitness but that doesn't excuse that fact that Parolo, Giovinco, Quagliarella and originally Osvaldo were called up before him...Osvaldo ffs
I meant his form from the back end of last season/pre-season, which at this point is all we have to go on.

I don't agree with the call up of certain members of this squad, still I think this is probably about a good a time as any to drop Balotelli.
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Zerforax
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#1063
Report 4 years ago
#1063

Roma’s Daniele De Rossi can lay claim to being Serie A’s highest earner after figures were released on Tuesday detailing the wages paid to players in the Italian league.

The Italy midfielder earns £5.2m (€6.5m) a year or £100,000 a week net, a healthy enough amount but dwarfed by the £300,000 a week (gross) of the Premier League’s highest-paid player, Manchester United’s Wayne Rooney.

The figures published by Gazzetta dello Sports show that the Italian league is falling behind on Europe’s pay scale with, for example, Gareth Bale, Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi all earning over £200,000 a week in La Liga.

Fernando Torres, who left Chelsea to sign a two-year loan deal with Milan, has surrendered his £175,000 a week for £60,000 a week in Serie A.

Another Premier League émigré, the former United captain Nemanja Vidic, will make around £50,000 a week at Internazionale while Micah Richards, who left Manchester City for Fiorentina, will earn £26,000 a week.

Juventus are the biggest payers and are the only Italian club to increase their wage bill from the 2013-14 season with Carlos Tevez and Arturo Vidal earning upwards of £60,000-per-week, though the promising Paul Pogba has to exist on a relatively meagre £23,000 a week.

The top-earning coach is Napoli’s Rafael Benítez on £2.8m with his centre-forward Gonzalo Higuaín the league’s second-best paid player on £4.4m.
http://www.theguardian.com/football/...highest-earner

I can't believe how much lower the wages are in Italy compared to England. Anyone know what the tax is like? I don't think it's much lower than the other European countries.
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ra-ra-ra
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#1064
Report 4 years ago
#1064
Inter-Napoli... what a great last 10 minutes to a game that was awfully dull! Awful defending by both teams too.

Watching Napoli this season hasn't been great but thank God for Callejon. Saved them on a couple of occasions, nice volley for the second goal tonight.


I need to share this wonderful own goal from the Milan game earlier too... oh dear.

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ra-ra-ra
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#1065
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#1065
Lovely stuff that Di Natale scored his 200th goal on his 400th appearance. To think he teased us with wanting to retire at the end of last season too.
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The_Mighty_Bush
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#1066
Report 4 years ago
#1066
(Original post by ra-ra-ra)
Lovely stuff that Di Natale scored his 200th goal on his 400th appearance. To think he teased us with wanting to retire at the end of last season too.
Incredible player. Shows that you can't write off anyone too early with the form he's hit later in his career. Knows the value of loyalty and humility too.
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ra-ra-ra
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#1067
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#1067
Great news to see that Joaquin Correa has taken the step into European football and signed for Sampdoria this morning. Quite a few European clubs were said to have shown a bit of interest in him from Monaco to Benfica to Man City to Chelsea, so I'm a little bit surprised (but at the same time very pleased) to see him signing for Sampdoria. Very much looking forward to seeing how he will take to European football as I have done nothing but admire him whilst he's been playing over in Argentina. Hopefully this move will work out for him.
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Rock Fan
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#1068
Report 3 years ago
#1068
Interesting AC Milan looking to leave the San Siro
http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/31074970
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RD208
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#1069
Report 3 years ago
#1069
Mario Gomez is back - 5 in 3 games. It's a shame he was injured a lot of last season. When he gets going he is easily a 25 goal a season striker.

I'm following Italian football from a distance this season. I used to get to see some games but now I see virtually nothing.

I've got to admit I'm fed up of this Juve dominance. I hope Roma can continue to put up the fight but they seem to drop too many points against the top teams. Napoli have been meh in 3rd, doubt they'll finish higher. Was hoping Fiorentina could make a return to the Champions League but it's not looking likely.

It's nice to see a good old Italian team in Sampdoria doing well, but I wish Milan could get their act together. Used to be my favourite European club, and they had a brilliant team between from the turn of the century up until Ibra left really.

It's also sad what has happened to Parma. Couldn't play in Europe this season and now bottom.
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jam277
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#1070
Report 3 years ago
#1070
(Original post by Strange Fruittt)
Hypocrisy undeniably tinged with racism, in Italy

who'd have ****ing thought it ! :rolleyes:!

****ing *****

if I wasn't on a hipster nihilist cycle it would make my blood boil lol, utter *****

****ing disgrace Italian football is.

Guardian article;
Spoiler:
Show



Basically there are bigger things in this world to cry about and give a **** about, but Mario's personality is somewhat explained by the consistent racist undermining and hatred he's received.
I just read this properly. Pretty sad to see personally. Absolutely ridiculous he has to suffer this nonsense. Hope he finds happiness.
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asr11
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#1071
Report 3 years ago
#1071
RIP Parma
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Mackay
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#1072
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#1072
Terrible about Parma's plight - at one stage in the 90s they had Baggio, Cannavaro, Buffon...
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Aky786UK
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#1073
Report 3 years ago
#1073
Apparently, no confirmation of their demise but incredibly sad if they do. Missed the Channel 4 days, like, as stated above, they had a selection of good players. Thuram, Zola aswell.
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Mackay
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#1074
Report 3 years ago
#1074
(Original post by Aky786UK)
Apparently, no confirmation of their demise but incredibly sad if they do. Missed the Channel 4 days, like, as stated above, they had a selection of good players. Thuram, Zola aswell.
James Richardson > every other football presenter.
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Bubzeh
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#1075
Report 3 years ago
#1075
Well this thread is dead. But anyway now Rafa is on his way to Madrid I will close by saying, Napoli was a fantastic time. Such a modest club that didn't go spending huge sums of cash but ultimately couldn't compete with Juve. Losing Pepe Reina and our best defender (Fernandez) to Swansea was the nail in the coffin though last summer.

Tonight. Napoli vs Lazio.

FORZA NAPLES
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TH3-FL45H
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#1076
Report 3 years ago
#1076
(Original post by Bubzeh)
Well this thread is dead. But anyway now Rafa is on his way to Madrid I will close by saying, Napoli was a fantastic time. Such a modest club that didn't go spending huge sums of cash but ultimately couldn't compete with Juve. Losing Pepe Reina and our best defender (Fernandez) to Swansea was the nail in the coffin though last summer.

Tonight. Napoli vs Lazio.

FORZA NAPLES
Do you just support whichever team benitez is managing?

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Mackay
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#1077
Report 3 years ago
#1077
More goals in Serie A than any other major European division this season. The renaissance is well and truly underway.
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jam277
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#1078
Report 3 years ago
#1078
Forza biancocelesti!!!
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Mackay
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#1079
Report 3 years ago
#1079
Good to see Torino end such a good campaign with a thumping, too. Enjoyed watching them in the Europa League.
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Stramala
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#1080
Report 3 years ago
#1080
So Parma finally has a formal purchase offer. Hopefully it doesn't fall through, because it does appear to be just the one offer.

It may be too little too late for keeping the playing staff - other clubs are circling like vultures for the remains of their first team squad. I keep seeing Antonio Mirante linked to Inter.

At least they have a strong captain in the dressing room though - Lucarelli has spent so much time at the club, I get the feeling he will follow them down to Serie B rather than abandon ship as others may be tempted to do.

As for Inter, well...not much hope there. I expect Kovacic will be gone shortly. Once again, a young talent leaves the club and will blossom into a world class player elsewhere. I'm stunned that Icardi renewed though, I was certain he'd leave for Champions League football elsewhere. There is talk of signing Benatia, Cuadrado, Yaya Toure...I don't believe a word of it. No doubt the magic solution for our defensive problems will be Mobido Diakite on a free :facepalm2:
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