Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tigerz)
    IKR, the e=hv question was also a repeat this paper was quite similar actually as it also had the membrane cell...

    More greener as it had less c02 and used the least voltage?
    Exactly what I said!! lol


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by abzy1234)
    Awesome!

    Umm I think everyone's covered everything tbh; there were some simple replica questions, like the NaCl structure, C-F vs C-Cl bond, e=hv calculations... I think that's all tbh!

    And I'm afraid there's no real chance of anyone getting hold of the paper due to strict copyright laws. Unless there's a teacher out there lurking on this forum, who will kindly upload it for us

    Haha yup, when I did f331, someone sneakily copied it so its possible! Yeah that was standard though got 1.17 (3 sf) for the frequency and 7.something for the bit above!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by booooomblastruin)
    Page 246 of Chemical ideas, table at the bottom. I remember the question said to give the systematic name, so I don't know if both are acceptable.
    Nitrate (III) is the systematic name
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by super121)
    Nitrate (III) is the systematic name
    How on earth were we meant to know this at AS?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It does not say in the spec that we need to know the systematic nAvq,e of NO2- ion, yet they asked that. Isn't that illegal?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MintCrepz)
    How on earth were we meant to know this at AS?

    (Original post by krisshP)
    It does not say in the spec that we need to know the systematic nAvq,e of NO2- ion, yet they asked that. Isn't that illegal?
    I agree with you, I only know because i've done F334 and F335
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I i have to admit, i didn't this exam easy at all, but from past experience, there wasn't any particularly hard questions apart from the question at the end which was quite querky.

    I reckon atleast 83 for the A, and may be up to 85. Remember they usually have to cap the percentage of people who achieve A's and i know a lot of people who seem like they got close to 100, or atleast 95.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anthonyrf)
    What did people say for the bonding question!? I said hydrogen bonds between molecules of propan-1ol and pentene had Id-Id and so on..


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Anyone? lol


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anthonyrf)
    Exactly what I said!! lol

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by MintCrepz)
    Yeah yeah sounds like we got similar answers !
    Haha yup, seems like i've gotten similar to quite a few people on here!

    (Original post by juniorx)
    i said less co2 and the total enery was lower?
    Yeah thats probably gonna be alright, defo the co2 bit

    In fact for the C-F bond its more strong as its a smaller atom right :P

    I found the paper decent but a lot of my friends hated it haha, so I think boundaries will be about 65-70ish for an A?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by krisshP)
    It does not say in the spec that we need to know the systematic nAvq,e of NO2- ion, yet they asked that. Isn't that illegal?
    this is ocr we're talking about...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by super121)
    Nitrate (III) is the systematic name
    phew, thought i might have gone that wrong when people said it was nitrogen dioxide
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by juniorx)
    i thought it was n2o

    Wouldn't that would mean that the oxygen forms two single bonds with the nitrogen and then has two lone pairs left over?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by juniorx)
    i said less co2 and the total enery was lower?
    I said that
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    For the C-F bond... I just said "higher frequency UV required as more energy is required to break the C-F bond as C-F has a greater polarity than C-Cl and so greater bond enthalpy"
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    19
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Study Helper
    (Original post by krisshP)
    It does not say in the spec that we need to know the systematic nAvq,e of NO2- ion, yet they asked that. Isn't that illegal?
    It could have easily been worked out using the oxidation states (which is on the spec).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tejmasta)
    phew, thought i might have gone that wrong when people said it was nitrogen dioxide
    Nitrogen dioxide? :O I'm pretty sure it was an ion and N2O not NO2
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tigerz)
    Haha yup, when I did f331, someone sneakily copied it so its possible! Yeah that was standard though got 1.17 (3 sf) for the frequency and 7.something for the bit above!
    We shall see! And ditto, got the same as well

    (Original post by MintCrepz)
    How on earth were we meant to know this at AS?
    You worked out the oxidation state of nitrogen in that ion in the earlier part when it was talking about oxidation, and there's two oxygen atoms, so you know it's going to end in ate... Systematic means you need to put in the oxidation state of the central atom in brackets.

    It's like the chlorate section in the AS revision guide
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tigerz)
    Haha yup, seems like i've gotten similar to quite a few people on here!



    Yeah thats probably gonna be alright, defo the co2 bit

    In fact for the C-F bond its more strong as its a smaller atom right :P
    i said the c-f bond length is shorter and that flourine is more electronegative so will form a stronger bond (electrons occupy a shell closer to the positive nucleus-distance is less)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by abzy1234)
    It really doesn't matter tbh. You learn this in F335 in a bit more detail; the A2 revision guide also writes Nitrate (III) ion:

    Attachment 223196
    If it's in F335 A2, why were we asked this question? It's not in the F332 spec, so it's an illegal question by evil OCR salters.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by steviep14)
    For the C-F bond... I just said "higher frequency UV required as more energy is required to break the C-F bond as C-F has a greater polarity than C-Cl and so greater bond enthalpy"
    Yeah that's correct.

    I kinda said that the C-F bond was stronger than the C-Cl bonds as flourines bonds are closer to the nucleus or some crap like that :/


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.