Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Oh god... had a bad realisation. Got left by the class teacher of the horrid class where my photo was taken- in the same computer room, but with a different class, just for 5 minutes during the lesson. But she'd let them listen to music on their phones (exactly why I did with the other group), and once I was on my own I was terrified that one of them was going to be sneaking pictures of me again Oh dear. And that was with a class that I know to be very nice- I thought I was OK!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by affinity89)
    Why wouldn't we be allowed to be on our own with the classes? :confused: We are all CRB checked etc... I am usually on my own with the class and have been since my first placement. The only exception is PE - primary student teachers are not insured to teach PE, so I have to have another teacher in there with me for that.
    It depends on the school's insurance and overall policy. Some schools have a policy that trainee teachers can not be left alone with a class of children (I guess because if something went wrong and there isn't technically someone who is employed by the school in the room there could be a problem with parents etc) so if you're in a school like that then they won't let you be on your own. Some schools are okay with you being alone with the class if a TA is present whereas other schools want a fully qualified teacher to also be in the classroom too.

    In my first PGCE placement the school had a policy that there should be a TA/someone employed at the school in the room with a trainee teacher; but there were instances when that didn't happen such as PPA time if we were short staffed for TAs. At first I thought it was a reflection on me and that they didn't trust me to be alone with the class but they later explained it was just the school's policy on trainee teachers which related to their insurance. In my second placement school they didn't have this policy and I had the class a day and a half a week on my own as the "official" class teacher as my mentor aka the actual class teacher only worked a 3.5 day week so they just used me as a normal supply teacher and I continued doing that until the end of the summer term once I'd finished my actual placement.

    I always preferred being on my own with the class when I was training as I felt more like a real teacher and was more comfortable/confident as I knew I wasn't being watched (even though I had a fantastic relationship with the teachers/TAs at both of my schools) but it was a weird feeling when I became qualified and suddenly was on my own. I did supply when I first qualified as I moved house and didn't get a job for the September and it was so odd walking into a class of kids when you'd never been in that school before and treated as the font of knowledge/the real deal when you had absolutely no idea about what to do if something went wrong so really, you should be trusted less than when you were a trainee teacher in a school you knew!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by noodles!)
    Oh god... had a bad realisation. Got left by the class teacher of the horrid class where my photo was taken- in the same computer room, but with a different class, just for 5 minutes during the lesson. But she'd let them listen to music on their phones (exactly why I did with the other group), and once I was on my own I was terrified that one of them was going to be sneaking pictures of me again Oh dear. And that was with a class that I know to be very nice- I thought I was OK!
    Does your school not have a no phones in class policy that you can implement on a no nonsense "you've got your phone out, hand it in, see me at the end of the lesson/day/week/whenever they normally get it back, no ifs and buts, carry on with lesson" ?

    They shouldn't have their phone out let alone be taking pictures of you and they will know it. If you're scared of them and on edge they'll know and they'll realise that they can play you with it so you really do need to get this sorted out as if you don't stamp down on it now and show them its completely unacceptable then they'll carry on as they've realised they've got one up on you. Can you speak to the class teacher about it?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Just thought I'd come on here... I used to be on a lot, but stopped.

    So PGCE recents. I went away for Christmas, and went to a different school for 4 weeks then came back to this one. I was totally out of it, not at all concentrating, and felt really far behind (especially since that's when we were given our 10000 word dissertation to do!). Anyway, over Easter I caught up, and have the nightmare class (my own class teacher struggles with him), first lesson back. I cracked down, kept people back, had names on the board, moved people around in a seating plan. Basically, I did all the stuff I should have been doing before Easter. But... that wasn't good enough. He said it was probably because it was the first day back, so they were well behaved because of that.

    I feel so demotivated now. Just something like "yeah you were doing all the right things" or something other than blaming the significantly improved behaviour on a factor outside my control! I'm now waiting for a chance to prove to him that I'm doing better and that it was a blip before Easter.

    Anyway, rant over.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    Does your school not have a no phones in class policy that you can implement on a no nonsense "you've got your phone out, hand it in, see me at the end of the lesson/day/week/whenever they normally get it back, no ifs and buts, carry on with lesson" ?

    They shouldn't have their phone out let alone be taking pictures of you and they will know it. If you're scared of them and on edge they'll know and they'll realise that they can play you with it so you really do need to get this sorted out as if you don't stamp down on it now and show them its completely unacceptable then they'll carry on as they've realised they've got one up on you. Can you speak to the class teacher about it?
    I'd allowed phones as the class teacher does during computer lessons so they can listen to music- every other class I've encountered there would be completely trustworthy (before this happens)- but there will be no more phones, definitely not!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Can any of you lovely peeps who teach at Primary help me out with ideas for teaching sentences? I have a KS4 (!) class who can't see why 'I wanted a new dress I went to the shops.' isn't a sentence ?!? Help! We've covered compound and complex sentences, but I need to take it back a step as many of them can't understand that the quoted sentence isn't correct.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by affinity89)
    Why wouldn't we be allowed to be on our own with the classes? :confused: We are all CRB checked etc... I am usually on my own with the class and have been since my first placement. The only exception is PE - primary student teachers are not insured to teach PE, so I have to have another teacher in there with me for that.



    I arrived at school at 7am today. I left school at 5.50pm. A near 11 hour day and I've had to bring stuff home [Big Write marking and some resource prep for tomorrow]. The joys of having some 'issues' in the class amongst certain pupils and the fact I've ended up doing an extra curricular club [the only student, of the four at my school, who seems to have landed that one lol]. I am shattered!

    So looking forward to the weekend! It best be amazing lol.
    It's to do with insurance apparently! I don't know, it's university policy I guess. Most mentors don't really abide by it though!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Has anyone had an interview yet? Eeeeek.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beckye)
    Has anyone had an interview yet? Eeeeek.
    Good luck!!!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    Does your school not have a no phones in class policy that you can implement on a no nonsense "you've got your phone out, hand it in, see me at the end of the lesson/day/week/whenever they normally get it back, no ifs and buts, carry on with lesson" ?

    They shouldn't have their phone out let alone be taking pictures of you and they will know it. If you're scared of them and on edge they'll know and they'll realise that they can play you with it so you really do need to get this sorted out as if you don't stamp down on it now and show them its completely unacceptable then they'll carry on as they've realised they've got one up on you. Can you speak to the class teacher about it?
    A trick that I've heard about- and, one day, really really want to do!- is to get a stash of old phones from phone shops.

    If someone has a phone out in your lesson, confiscate it, then quickly put the old phone on the desk and smash it with a hammer or similar.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by noodles!)
    I'd allowed phones as the class teacher does during computer lessons so they can listen to music- every other class I've encountered there would be completely trustworthy (before this happens)- but there will be no more phones, definitely not!
    Well unfortunately for that class they have all lost their right to have phones out due to some silly individuals.

    I'm surprised that they're allowed their phones out to listen to music though in any lesson because then the phone becomes a status symbol. What about the kids who don't have a phone and/or don't have a phone that plays music? Or just don't want to listen to music? They've now been instantly made to stand out and been "highlighted" as a status symbol is allowed out in class.

    One thing I would say is don't be afraid to implement your own rules, particularly now you're in the final term of your training. I found in my second placement that I was a lot stricter and more pedantic with my class than the actual class teacher as it really annoyed me when they did things like talk during the register, wander around the classroom or have conversations during "silent" reading. I also can't stand it if they talk when I'm talking or when someone else in the class is talking, whereas again, their normal teacher was quite happy to talk over mumblings. When I started my PGCE it felt like I had to just follow whatever rules the class teacher had made but by the end I just did it in a way that worked best for me because that's the way you'll get the best results and at the end of the day you're in charge. If you don't want them to have phones then don't let them have phones and it doesn't matter whether their other teacher lets them have them out or not because you're the boss. When I started implementing my own rules I found life easier as then I felt much more in control as the children were doing exactly what I wanted rather than doing what they wanted. Its hard at first to make a change but once you've done it they do get the message and it gives you more practice for when you get your own class as you've then had a class doing exactly what you want them to do.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Can any of you lovely peeps who teach at Primary help me out with ideas for teaching sentences? I have a KS4 (!) class who can't see why 'I wanted a new dress I went to the shops.' isn't a sentence ?!? Help! We've covered compound and complex sentences, but I need to take it back a step as many of them can't understand that the quoted sentence isn't correct.
    Do they understand/know what a sentence actually is, for a start?

    Are there any dialect influences that means that they DO say "I wanted a dress I went to the shops" and therefore, to them, that is a sentence because when they say it they wouldn't add anything else into it? Similarly, if you have a lot of members of the class who speak other languages at home it could be that in their other languages something like that IS a sentence so you need to teach them that in English we have to add additional words to make it a full sentence whereas in their other language this might not be the case.

    You could do some exercises where they have "things" written out, some of which are sentences and some aren't so then they have to group them into something which is a sentence and something which isn't. Get them to say it out loud as that's normally the best way of teaching sentences as they can see where they pause. Where they pause, they can either have a full stop or they can add a "special" word to combine the two phrases together, so in effect, there's two right answers there. Then get them to explain their reasoning to other people. Then they have to correct the ones which they've said are wrong so that they do make proper sentences.

    You could also look at things like with BBM/facebook chat etc when they start a new line/send a new message it could be a new sentence. So often they'd put: I wanted a new dress <new line> I went to the shops <new line> something else <new line> but what about if they wanted to combine all of that into one message before pressing enter? (you could say something like BBM are now charging people per message they send so they've got to do it all in one message before they send it) then again, this would force them to look at making either lots of compound sentences or altering some into more complex sentences. I did something like this to do with code writing with my KS2 class when we were looking at sentences but I didn't really relate it to facebook or BBM!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FadeToBlackout)
    A trick that I've heard about- and, one day, really really want to do!- is to get a stash of old phones from phone shops.

    If someone has a phone out in your lesson, confiscate it, then quickly put the old phone on the desk and smash it with a hammer or similar.
    LOL. Brilliant. Thankfully my current school has a really strict policy on phones ( :love: ) but this is one thing I will have in the armoury for later :awesome:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FadeToBlackout)
    A trick that I've heard about- and, one day, really really want to do!- is to get a stash of old phones from phone shops.

    If someone has a phone out in your lesson, confiscate it, then quickly put the old phone on the desk and smash it with a hammer or similar.
    Genius, absolute genius.

    Now, how to get away with taking a hammer into school... guess throwing it on the floor and stampting on it would do the trick!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    Do they understand/know what a sentence actually is, for a start?

    I did something like this to do with code writing with my KS2 class when we were looking at sentences but I didn't really relate it to facebook or BBM!
    In short, no. So that is the first thing that I have to conquer. Everyone in the class speaks English as their only language but they do write like they talk as you highlighted! I absolutely love the BBM idea.. They shouldn't find it so 'old fashioned' if I present it through that format. Thank you; you've really helped!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    what are your opinions on if i should do i degrre in BA education studies(3years) leading to PGCE primary or a degree in BA primary education(3years) this septmber? THe first would obviously be a year longer but i don't really know which one to do...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    Well unfortunately for that class they have all lost their right to have phones out due to some silly individuals.

    I'm surprised that they're allowed their phones out to listen to music though in any lesson because then the phone becomes a status symbol. What about the kids who don't have a phone and/or don't have a phone that plays music? Or just don't want to listen to music? They've now been instantly made to stand out and been "highlighted" as a status symbol is allowed out in class.

    One thing I would say is don't be afraid to implement your own rules, particularly now you're in the final term of your training. I found in my second placement that I was a lot stricter and more pedantic with my class than the actual class teacher as it really annoyed me when they did things like talk during the register, wander around the classroom or have conversations during "silent" reading. I also can't stand it if they talk when I'm talking or when someone else in the class is talking, whereas again, their normal teacher was quite happy to talk over mumblings. When I started my PGCE it felt like I had to just follow whatever rules the class teacher had made but by the end I just did it in a way that worked best for me because that's the way you'll get the best results and at the end of the day you're in charge. If you don't want them to have phones then don't let them have phones and it doesn't matter whether their other teacher lets them have them out or not because you're the boss. When I started implementing my own rules I found life easier as then I felt much more in control as the children were doing exactly what I wanted rather than doing what they wanted. Its hard at first to make a change but once you've done it they do get the message and it gives you more practice for when you get your own class as you've then had a class doing exactly what you want them to do.
    Yeah the teacher is quite laissez-faire. It's a girls' grammar (!) so they are all either privileged enough to have phones/mp3 players, and just share with their friends who haven't. There were no issues in that respect.

    I have them tomorrow- I have some stuff to try out/enforce, lesson content is much less important (lesson is based on a differentiated worksheet so most of the time the good ones can be independent)

    1 is the phone ban of course, though this wasn't an issue in the normal classroom. And along those lines I need to make sure I don't seem intimidated in any way!

    2 is a new positive strategy to get them to shut up when I want (I can't stand being spoken over either)- 1-3 on the board, these are three chances to be quiet in time when I ask for quiet and count down from five. If they aren't, I cross one out. If I haven't crossed all three out by the end of the lesson (ie. if they've responded quickly enough), I note that down and after three lessons where that happens they all get a small reward.

    3 is to implement a three strikes, you're out policy for once in my life. I need to put a positive slant on it at some point though, so have ordered some counters- 3 to each student, one gets taken away per warning and can be earned for good work. Each multiple of 3 at end of lesson gets a sticker.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by noodles!)
    Yeah the teacher is quite laissez-faire. It's a girls' grammar (!) so they are all either privileged enough to have phones/mp3 players, and just share with their friends who haven't. There were no issues in that respect.

    I have them tomorrow- I have some stuff to try out/enforce, lesson content is much less important (lesson is based on a differentiated worksheet so most of the time the good ones can be independent)

    1 is the phone ban of course, though this wasn't an issue in the normal classroom. And along those lines I need to make sure I don't seem intimidated in any way!

    2 is a new positive strategy to get them to shut up when I want (I can't stand being spoken over either)- 1-3 on the board, these are three chances to be quiet in time when I ask for quiet and count down from five. If they aren't, I cross one out. If I haven't crossed all three out by the end of the lesson (ie. if they've responded quickly enough), I note that down and after three lessons where that happens they all get a small reward.

    3 is to implement a three strikes, you're out policy for once in my life. I need to put a positive slant on it at some point though, so have ordered some counters- 3 to each student, one gets taken away per warning and can be earned for good work. Each multiple of 3 at end of lesson gets a sticker.
    Really like the idea of the 1 2 3 on the board. Will definitely be yoinking that one and using it as I'm always looking for ideas for getting classes to be quiet. Good to mix up different strategies so they don't become 'immune'.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    The 1 2 3 thing went fantastically with my year 7s (who just needed something to settle them a bit quicker), but with my naughty year 8s it was going well until they lost all three warnings and I got asked, "well, what happens now?" by quite a few of them!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Struggled this afternoon with the class. Nothing major but they are serious fuss pots. I had 6 without PE kits. One of whom waited until everyone else was changed before mentioning it, despite my standing by the box of spare kit handing things out for ages lol. It took them nearly 15 minutes to get changed!

    My teacher says I need to 'show my teeth'. That is the goal for tomorrow...

    I am finding it a bit odd. I have two TAs some days plus the teacher has been using the time to do some one-to-one sessions with some of the SEN pupils. So, for quite a few mornings, I have three other adults in the classroom. It is a bit of a shock to the system lol.
    Tomorrow afternoon I have the class all to myself though, so hopefully it will go well. I feel more relaxed, even though I am probably no different with the kids. I suppose you just feel like you are being judged when other adults are watching lol.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.