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    On a shading question like where you shade the region for which say | Z | < x which has been transformed can you use a pencil to change the equal signs to inequality signs on part b and then state in part c refer to pencil inequalities or something?
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    (Original post by Tizzydag)
    Im a little stuck here guys. How do we answer transformation questions that involve arg (z-z1)= angle
    Generally write z in terms of w, then sub that into arg(z-z1) = angle. Should be fine as long as you remember how arguments work (e.g. arg(z1/z2) = arg(z1) - arg(z2) etc)

    (Original post by Rkai01)
    On a shading question like where you shade the region for which say | Z | < x which has been transformed can you use a pencil to change the equal signs to inequality signs on part b and then state in part c refer to pencil inequalities or something?
    I think it would probably be better to rewrite it out than change work you've already done.
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    Hi guys, can someone help me out june 2014 (R) , In question 7b i found the theta values but i dont get why some of the values are the same, so are you meant to just carry on until you get 5 x values?? Thanks
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    Predictions for the paper tomorrow

    and any useful tips?
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    (Original post by Cpj16)
    Predictions for the paper tomorrow

    and any useful tips?
    Tangents to polar curves haven't came up in a while.
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    guys, could someone please explain the questions where they ask you to shade the area after a transformation in the complex plane? June 2009 6b or June 2015 5b for example
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    Anyone know a clear solution for question 4 part B of the June 2015 paper? The question seems really confusing and I don't really understand arsey's working and can't find the official mark scheme either.
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    (Original post by ViKZZ)
    Had a quick question, in FP2 June 2015, how do you know the answer to 1b? The answer is apparently x>1 however I dont understand how we're just meant to see that since it is a 1 mark question.
    If you use the value's you got from part a and put them into the new equation, the LHS will be smaller than the RHS but the equation will say its bigger, which is wrong. However with x=1 the equation is correct which leaves that as the only correct answer.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOxtcUJa1J4

    I understood after this guy explained it.
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    (Original post by Nirm)
    Anyone know a clear solution for question 4 part B of the June 2015 paper? The question seems really confusing and I don't really understand arsey's working and can't find the official mark scheme either.
    http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...c_20150812.pdf

    Official mark scheme
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    (Original post by Cpj16)
    Predictions for the paper tomorrow

    and any useful tips?
    There aren't too many chapters, but here is my prediction based on previous years (in order of question number):
    1. Partial Fractions (Usually starts with this)
    2. Inequalities (Or this, near the beginning)
    3. First Order Differentials (Probably relatively easy)
    4. Polar Coordinates (Finding the area of a region)
    5. Transformations (Harder than last year)
    6. De Moivre's Theorem Proof (The standard routine)
    7. Argand Diagram Arcs (Hasn't appeared on many papers)
    8. Second Order Differentials (Something with trig functions)
    I could be completely off but proofs haven't appeared much over the past few years so I am expecting one of those to pop up for sure. It is mostly simple proof by induction so will only throw people off if they haven't done their studying.
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    (Original post by ImJared)
    There aren't too many chapters, but here is my prediction based on previous years (in order of question number):
    1. Partial Fractions (Usually starts with this)
    2. Inequalities (Or this, near the beginning)
    3. First Order Differentials (Probably relatively easy)
    4. Polar Coordinates (Finding the area of a region)
    5. Transformations (Harder than last year)
    6. De Moivre's Theorem Proof (The standard routine)
    7. Argand Diagram Arcs (Hasn't appeared on many papers)
    8. Second Order Differentials (Something with trig functions)
    I could be completely off but proofs haven't appeared much over the past few years so I am expecting one of those to pop up for sure. It is mostly simple proof by induction so will only throw people off if they haven't done their studying.
    No series?
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    The Maclaurin series of a function is just the Taylor expansion of the function with x_0 = 0 right?
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    (Original post by mathsmann)
    Hi guys, can someone help me out june 2014 (R) , In question 7b i found the theta values but i dont get why some of the values are the same, so are you meant to just carry on until you get 5 x values?? Thanks
    Yeah that's it, just carry on until you have 5 different x values
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    (Original post by Euclidean)
    The Maclaurin series of a function is just the Taylor expansion of the function with x_0 = 0 right?
    f(0) + f'(0)x etc
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    (Original post by edothero)
    f(0) + f'(0)x etc
    Cheers, just wanted to clarify
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    (Original post by edothero)
    No series?
    Probably on the first question, but something simple. They had a tough series question last year so I don't think they'll repeat anything similar.
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    (Original post by ImJared)
    There aren't too many chapters, but here is my prediction based on previous years (in order of question number):
    1. Partial Fractions (Usually starts with this)
    2. Inequalities (Or this, near the beginning)
    3. First Order Differentials (Probably relatively easy)
    4. Polar Coordinates (Finding the area of a region)
    5. Transformations (Harder than last year)
    6. De Moivre's Theorem Proof (The standard routine)
    7. Argand Diagram Arcs (Hasn't appeared on many papers)
    8. Second Order Differentials (Something with trig functions)
    I could be completely off but proofs haven't appeared much over the past few years so I am expecting one of those to pop up for sure. It is mostly simple proof by induction so will only throw people off if they haven't done their studying.
    What proofs do we have to know?
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    (Original post by Euclidean)
    The Maclaurin series of a function is just the Taylor expansion of the function with x_0 = 0 right?
    Yes. Also, if like me you forget which is which, you can normally tell from the question (it asks for up to x^3 instead of (x - a)^3 ☺️)

    * Oops didn't realise you'd already got a reply
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    Please could anyone do a worked solution for question 12a https://8dedc505ac3fba908c50836f5905...%20Edexcel.pdf I've tried it by substituting in for lambda plus lambda i when x is greater than 0 but for some reason I can't get it to work but I thought the method was correct? Thanks
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    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-06-07 at 16.42.14.png
Views: 147
Size:  43.7 KB
    Im a little confused, in this question, to find the length OP the mark scheme worked out r
    Attachment 545355545357 but in this question, the length of PS is y instead of r
    both lines are parallel to the initial line .
    Attached Images
     
 
 
 
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