Oxford Applicants for 2012 Entry Watch

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MeeMee
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#1161
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#1161
(Original post by such_a_lady)
Ohh nice, in English they're "Romance" languages, not romanistic, which is quite interesting. I wish I were fluent in another language! How did you become fluent in those? What's your definition of fluent?

I also learnt Latin and did very well in it too
Daaaaaamn, I looked it up and it said romanistic. anyway. you know what i meant so it's alright
I define fluent as being able to communicate effectively and being able to say everything that you want to say. and not making many pauses and mistakes. also being able to read and write. and understanding most/everything that's said.
I guess I'm just kind of good at learning new languages. I really enjoy it. I'm fluent in French because I've been taking it ever since 5th grade and have several subjects in French because of the doublediploma thing I do. Then I started learning English in 7th grade, thought it was pretty easy to get the basics down, went to the US for a year and if that is not gonna make you a fluent speaker then I don't know what is. And my dad is Jordanian, so that's how I know Arabic (a little. I'm not close to being fluent, I can't read or write, but I understand a lot that's said as long as it's my dad's dialect or one that's close to his because dialects in Arabic differ a lot. They are kinda like different languages.)
I really wanna learn Spanish, Chinese and become fluent in Arabic though.
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cik rye
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#1162
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#1162
Hello everybody..

i want to ask..i'm postgraduate applicant.. i already received conditional offer from both department and college with no academic condition and i only need to submit financial guarantee form.. i had sent it last two weeks..

So, what is the process after this?

Last two days, my potential supervisor told me that department's officer ask him to send project details for ATAS purpose.. am i guarantee to get the place?

normally how long it takes to get university contract, unconditional offer etc etc?
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Albertine
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#1163
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#1163
(Original post by such_a_lady)
Out of interest, what are AHs like? What makes them so hard?
Intense! A huge work load. They are much like the first year of uni for many subjects, such as AH Maths
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anyone_can_fly
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#1164
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#1164
(Original post by Albertine)
Intense! A huge work load. They are much like the first year of uni for many subjects, such as AH Maths
Well, I think they're only comparable to the first year of uni for Scottish universities, where it's a four year course. I've had a little look at the lecture notes for the first term of maths at Oxford (being the geek I am ), and while I recognised a lot of the material in the first week, by the second or so I was completely out of my depth.

However, there are other reasons why AHs are difficult. One difference is that the exam is holistic, rather than modular, so you have to revise the whole course for it. The exams are also (slightly) less predictable than A-level exams, I think.
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Gromit94
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#1165
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#1165
(Original post by Unconventional.)
What kind of schools do you all go to, i.e. grammar school/private school/comp etc? I'm just really interested in what kind of educational environment you're all used to.
I go to my local state comprehensive which has a pretty poor standing in the league tables. It's just been made an academy so my unusal GCSEs no longer really look that exciting... So in terms of educational environment I'm used to 1960s buildings with lots of noise and dogdy projectors but a nice little community of people and a lot of focus on facing the real world
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Gromit94
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#1166
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#1166
(Original post by cambio wechsel)
Oxford admits candidates from the private and maintained sectors at broadly the rate at which they apply.

If there's a seeming bias toward students from the south, the same bias exists at Sussex and Bristol and the reverse at Sheffield and Lancaster. At Oxford, as in those cases, it is chiefly a function of geography and the anticipating of long car journeys, and so is again about rates of application.
This is an interesting point where did you source this information from?
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cambio wechsel
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#1167
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#1167
(Original post by Gromit94)
This is an interesting point where did you source this information from?
http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...ics/index.html

click on the PDF link. The stats are broken down every which way you might want.
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anyone_can_fly
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#1168
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#1168
(Original post by cambio wechsel)
http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...ics/index.html

click on the PDF link. The stats are broken down every which way you might want.
There is a bias towards private school applicants, though. For example, 16.8% of state school maths applicants get in, as opposed to 27.5% of private school applicants. Presumably this is because private school applicants get more support with their application?
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cambio wechsel
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#1169
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#1169
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
There is a bias towards private school applicants, though. For example, 16.8% of state school maths applicants get in, as opposed to 27.5% of private school applicants. Presumably this is because private school applicants get more support with their application?
It might very well be because they are better at maths.

Mathematics is a peculiar one since it admits (with music and art) of talent being revealed at a very early age, and this in a way that is ungainsayable: because your sums add up or they don't. For this reason, people having a very considerable capacity for maths or music are much more usually, and far more reliably, identified and funneled into the private school system at 11 or 13 than are people who will later reveal an aptitude for history.

If you look at the British team in the mathematical olympiad, they are almost always kids from the famous private schools. Now, at that level there is no amount of tutoring that is going to get you where you need to be, not without innate talent - the teachers at those schools weren't and aren't as mathematically able as those kids. It isn't, then, the case that their schools have made them good at maths so much as that their capacity for maths has gotten them into those schools. In so far as they can, the private schools will cherry-pick from the state school system at entry-age, with full and partial fees bursaries, and maths is a subject area in which there are more reliable indicators, and so a lower rate of predictive failure, than might obtain elsewhere.
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Albertine
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#1170
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#1170
Which colleges are people applying to do law at? I've not seen anyone mention Law yet and I'm having a slight crisis.
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anyone_can_fly
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#1171
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#1171
(Original post by cambio wechsel)
It might very well be because they are better at maths.

Mathematics is a peculiar one since it admits (with music and art) of talent being revealed at a very early age, and this in a way that is ungainsayable: because your sums add up or they don't. For this reason, people having a very considerable capacity for maths or music are much more usually, and far more reliably, identified and funneled into the private school system at 11 or 13 than are people who will later reveal an aptitude for history.

If you look at the British team in the mathematical olympiad, they are almost always kids from the famous private schools. Now, at that level there is no amount of tutoring that is going to get you where you need to be, not without innate talent - the teachers at those schools weren't and aren't as mathematically able as those kids. It isn't, then, the case that their schools have made them good at maths so much as that their capacity for maths has gotten them into those schools. In so far as they can, the private schools will cherry-pick from the state school system at entry-age, with full and partial fees bursaries, and maths is a subject area in which there are more reliable indicators, and so a lower rate of predictive failure, than might obtain elsewhere.
But there are other reasons for private school kids to achieve more in the Olympiads. It costs money for schools to enter the maths challenges, which state schools (especially low-achieving ones) will be more reluctant to spend. There's also more awareness of the competitions in private schools. For example, at my (state) school we were given an hour to do the senior maths challenge instead of 1h30m. Private schools are more likely to have the resources to stretch the brightest kids, whereas in the average state school they will sit at the back of the class being bored, and possibly become disillusioned with the subject.
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Brand New Eyes
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#1172
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#1172
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
There is a bias towards private school applicants, though. For example, 16.8% of state school maths applicants get in, as opposed to 27.5% of private school applicants. Presumably this is because private school applicants get more support with their application?
You can't just make an assumption like that,

1) more people from maintained schools actually applied (more than double of private schools)
2) they really don't care what X or Y school you go to, as long as you meet their checklist.

Also, I can confirm on the more support bit, although private schools are more supportive of students in general really, not just oxbridge applicants. Having experienced both, at my state school, you'd be lucky if the teacher gave you the time of day, let alone extra help on problems etc.
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dnumberwang
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#1173
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#1173
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
But there are other reasons for private school kids to achieve more in the Olympiads. It costs money for schools to enter the maths challenges, which state schools (especially low-achieving ones) will be more reluctant to spend. There's also more awareness of the competitions in private schools. For example, at my (state) school we were given an hour to do the senior maths challenge instead of 1h30m. Private schools are more likely to have the resources to stretch the brightest kids, whereas in the average state school they will sit at the back of the class being bored, and possibly become disillusioned with the subject.
I could have sworn we got 2 hours for the senior maths challenge
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anyone_can_fly
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#1174
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#1174
(Original post by Brand New Eyes)
You can't just make an assumption like that,

1) more people from maintained schools actually applied (more than double of private schools)
2) they really don't care what X or Y school you go to, as long as you meet their checklist.

Also, I can confirm on the more support bit, although private schools are more supportive of students in general really, not just oxbridge applicants. Having experienced both, at my state school, you'd be lucky if the teacher gave you the time of day, let alone extra help on problems etc.
1) But I gave the percentage. So how many applied makes no difference.
2/Also) Wasn't that exactly what I was saying? That private school applicants have more support?

(Original post by dnumberwang)
I could have sworn we got 2 hours for the senior maths challenge
Just checked - it's 90mins. Was a bit surprised when you said that, getting a Silver because I only got 2/3 of the time is one thing, but it would actually be pretty impressive in half the time!
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anyone_can_fly
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#1175
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#1175
I got inspired by the offer-holders' thread (which I wasn't stalking :ninja:) to make a google doc spreadsheet of applicants. This way people can easily see who else wants to do their subject, and Reminisce doesn't have to keep updating the first post: people can just add themselves to the list.

I simplified some peoples results (e.g. someone who had done a mixture of IGCSEs and GCSEs - I combined them), so that I didn't take up a paragraph each time. If what I did was wrong, and it may well be, just change it. Sorry if I missed you out - please add yourself!

Here it is!
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such_a_lady
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#1176
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#1176
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
I got inspired by the offer-holders' thread (which I wasn't stalking :ninja:) to make a google doc spreadsheet of applicants. This way people can easily see who else wants to do their subject, and Reminisce doesn't have to keep updating the first post: people can just add themselves to the list.

I simplified some peoples results (e.g. someone who had done a mixture of IGCSEs and GCSEs - I combined them), so that I didn't take up a paragraph each time. If what I did was wrong, and it may well be, just change it. Sorry if I missed you out - please add yourself!

Here it is!
You wonderful human being. +rep

I stalk their thread too :ninja:
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anyone_can_fly
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#1177
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#1177
(Original post by such_a_lady)
You wonderful human being. +rep

I stalk their thread too :ninja:
It was that or practising my scales.

We can stalk together :ninja::ninja:
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nightmare91
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#1178
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#1178
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
I got inspired by the offer-holders' thread (which I wasn't stalking :ninja:) to make a google doc spreadsheet of applicants. This way people can easily see who else wants to do their subject, and Reminisce doesn't have to keep updating the first post: people can just add themselves to the list.

I simplified some peoples results (e.g. someone who had done a mixture of IGCSEs and GCSEs - I combined them), so that I didn't take up a paragraph each time. If what I did was wrong, and it may well be, just change it. Sorry if I missed you out - please add yourself!

Here it is!
Very nice work! Didn't know though that we are already more than 100 applicants just in this forum :eek: and PPE clearly dominates the list
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Brand New Eyes
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#1179
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#1179
(Original post by anyone_can_fly)
1) But I gave the percentage. So how many applied makes no difference.
2/Also) Wasn't that exactly what I was saying? That private school applicants have more support?
But it does! it was a roughly 90-60 split so 60% places went to state schools and 40% to private. Whereas 68% of applications were from state schools and 30% private, the more people apply, the more it skews the data to a lower figure of success. And that only 13.5% of state schoolers get AAA or better, and anyone with that grade would be encouraged to apply. Whereas in private schools, AAA is more common, and I'd say that seeing as most people have it, you're actually discouraged to apply to Oxbridge unless you have a certain flair or they'd have half the year to mentor. E.g. At [not gna mention the name of the school, X] a high percentage get and are predicted straight As and A*s even, but they will only allow 5 oxbridge applicants. Do you see what I'm getting at?

2) Yes, I was backing up your point.

3) I didn't know google did spreadsheets! :O kudos. (just one note though, is there any way to automatically group courses together? I see History sandwiched in between a variety or courses)
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Brand New Eyes
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#1180
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#1180
(Original post by nightmare91)
Very nice work! Didn't know though that we are already more than 100 applicants just in this forum :eek: and PPE clearly dominates the list
Yet only 0.83% of applications!!! :O (well...estimated on 2010 figures of around 12000)
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