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    (Original post by yodawg321)
    I put the litmus paper turned red because of the HClO (Chloric acid) AND the HCL
    i guess they would ignore HCLO and give mark,but if markschemes hard and examiner decides to mark first attempt well..
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    (Original post by jackitsme)
    i guess they would ignore HCLO and give mark,but if markschemes hard and examiner decides to mark first attempt well..
    Chloric Acid should be a mark though as its acidic
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    (Original post by jackitsme)
    H20 + Cl2 -> HClO + HCL

    thats the equation for sure it was in past paper,
    now HCL is acid and is made therefore the paper is red
    So annoyed - I forgot to say HClO is also acidic (chloric acid or hypochlorous acid). However I did talk about HCl.

    I also shoved 'increasing electronegativities' into the IE question but forgot to state that it was an example of periodicity. I don't know if you need to state 'increasing electronegativities' to get a mark.
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    The question referring to table 5.1 I think it was, with a range of ionisation energies. It asked why is it unnecessary to differentiate between Diamond & Graphite when referring to I.E of Carbon, or something along the lines of that. I presumed that, allotropes (different physical arrangement of the same element) have the same ionisation energy, anyone mind shedding some light on this question?
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    I went through this paper just now with my chemistry teacher and he said that a lot of thinking was required to answer these questions - meaning they weren't obvious at all.

    Most people at my college found it hard and there seems to be mixed views on here but usually (and unfortunately) the grade boundaries are higher in the summer exam period.

    I think this paper was so different to the past paper questions - I felt there was more to do for little marks. E.g. the volume question required more time, however, it was 1 mark which is meant to equal 1 minute.

    What does everyone think grade boundary wise? I feel it was harder than January.
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    My teacher said it was something about them being in a gaseous state.
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    (Original post by LH78)
    I went through this paper just now with my chemistry teacher and he said that a lot of thinking was required to answer these questions - meaning they weren't obvious at all.

    Most people at my college found it hard and there seems to be mixed views on here but usually (and unfortunately) the grade boundaries are higher in the summer exam period.

    I think this paper was so different to the past paper questions - I felt there was more to do for little marks. E.g. the volume question required more time, however, it was 1 mark which is meant to equal 1 minute.

    What does everyone think grade boundary wise? I feel it was harder than January.
    What were the common errors pointed out do you remember?
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    (Original post by Daniel__)
    The question referring to table 5.1 I think it was, with a range of ionisation energies. It asked why is it unnecessary to differentiate between Diamond & Graphite when referring to I.E of Carbon, or something along the lines of that. I presumed that, allotropes (different physical arrangement of the same element) have the same ionisation energy, anyone mind shedding some light on this question?
    Diamond and Graphite are both pure carbon. For the first ionisation energy then you need one mole of gaseous atoms and as diamond and graphite in their gaseous states are both just the same (pure carbon) then there is quite literally no difference between their first ionisation levels, as they are the same thing!
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    (Original post by yodawg321)
    Chloric Acid should be a mark though as its acidic
    Yes, but it would be aqueous I think, whereas the HCl would be gaseous.
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    (Original post by Funtry)
    Diamond and Graphite are both pure carbon. For the first ionisation energy then you need one mole of gaseous atoms and as diamond and graphite in their gaseous states are both just the same (pure carbon) then there is quite literally no difference between their first ionisation levels, as they are the same thing!
    Ah someone mentioned this, I guess if you said their ionisation energies are equal you'll get the mark, or you may have to reference to the fact that they are gaseous - hopefully the examiners provide some leeway.
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    (Original post by yodawg321)
    What were the common errors pointed out do you remember?
    I think many got the ion of the bleach wrong...i.e most put OH-
    Also the one about diamond and graphite most put about allotrope's but it was a continued question from ionisation energy so it was something about it being in a gaseous state.
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    its not 360cm3, its 1080cm3 because you have to take into account the 1:3 molar ratio
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    (Original post by Daniel__)
    Ah someone mentioned this, I guess if you said their ionisation energies are equal you'll get the mark, or you may have to reference to the fact that they are gaseous - hopefully the examiners provide some leeway.
    Inferred this in the question anyway I think, so I don't think you will (sorry!).

    I'd say the fact that they're gaseous and made up of the same atom's would be one mark (working off an F325 marking mindset).
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    (Original post by Stiffmeister)
    its not 360cm3, its 1080cm3 because you have to take into account the 1:3 molar ratio
    where was this 1:3 molar ratio??
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    (Original post by LH78)
    I went through this paper just now with my chemistry teacher and he said that a lot of thinking was required to answer these questions - meaning they weren't obvious at all.

    Most people at my college found it hard and there seems to be mixed views on here but usually (and unfortunately) the grade boundaries are higher in the summer exam period.

    I think this paper was so different to the past paper questions - I felt there was more to do for little marks. E.g. the volume question required more time, however, it was 1 mark which is meant to equal 1 minute.

    What does everyone think grade boundary wise? I feel it was harder than January.
    did he say anything about the intermolecular forces in PH3 cos I think I got that one wrong
    also I'm guessing 49/50 out of 60 because it was quite hard but grade boundaries in chem are usually high
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    (Original post by Funtry)
    where was this 1:3 molar ratio??
    He got mixed up with the questions
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    (Original post by Funtry)
    Inferred this in the question anyway I think, so I don't think you will (sorry!).

    I'd say the fact that they're gaseous and made up of the same atom's would be one mark (working off an F325 marking mindset).
    Bugger, thanks for the clarification.
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    (Original post by sesrugeda)
    I think you got it wrong? Sorry It actually said in the question that the litmus paper turned red :')


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    when do the unofficial mark schemes usually come up for this exam?
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    (Original post by Daniel__)
    Bugger, thanks for the clarification.
    The mark scheme may be kind on that question, it's just if I were marking that without a mark scheme, I would have given you 0, even though you are right, I'd say it's inferred.
 
 
 
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