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Edexcel Government & Politics - Unit 2 Governing the UK (09/06/16) Watch

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    Does anyone have any essay plans for judiciary???

    Such as are judges too powerful?
    Or how effectively the judiciary holds the executive to account?
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    how many points for a 1 sided 25 marker??
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Features of the constitution changed how many marks is that?
    it could be an essay.. but i dont have many points for it...eg having a quazi federal constitution, greater entrenchment through referendums i dont know what else
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Quickly what points would you use for does parliament hold gov to account?
    I've got a few but want to make certain
    >PMQs >Written letters andcomplaints >Select Committees >Backbench rebellions >Votes of no confidence >House of Lords
    Might be more but I can't think of any rn
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    ive failed

    this was my as level that i dropped in 2nd year and i'm retaking to get an A overall (got a high B in unit 1)

    I got a U on this last year so i'm just scanning through all the past paper q's and wonderin what might come up as the 25 marker and 40 marker, ignoring the 5/10 markers lmao
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    For 'checking executive power', I have:

    -> Question Time. (E.g. PMQs, Ministerial Question Time)
    -> House of Lords. (E.g. Tax Credit Reforms rejected)
    -> Committees. (E.g. Health Committee)
    -> Legislative Powers (E.g. Vote of no confidence)
    -> Backbench Rebellions. (E.g. Gay Marriage; 134 Tories rebelled)

    Would these be any good? I've always assumed 'checking' essentially means 'controlling' executive power.

    Also, Sarah Wolloston MP (Chair of the Health Committee) defected from the Leave campaign and is now with Remain. Could we add that in to any topics/questions?
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    Anyone got anymore predictions on what it would be?
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    examples for codified consitution questions???
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    it could be an essay.. but i dont have many points for it...eg having a quazi federal constitution, greater entrenchment through referendums i dont know what else
    I really hope we don't get that.
    That's awful
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    (Original post by LennyBicknel)
    >PMQs >Written letters andcomplaints >Select Committees >Backbench rebellions >Votes of no confidence >House of Lords
    Might be more but I can't think of any rn
    Oh so talk about 3 of those?
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    [QUOTE=UKStudent17;65590087]For 'checking executive power', I have:

    -> Question Time. (E.g. PMQs, Ministerial Question Time)
    -> House of Lords. (E.g. Tax Credit Reforms rejected)
    -> Committees. (E.g. Health Committee)
    -> Legislative Powers (E.g. Vote of no confidence)
    -> Backbench Rebellions. (E.g. Gay Marriage; 134 Tories rebelled)

    Would these be any good? I've always assumed 'checking' essentially means 'controlling' executive power.

    Also, Sarah Wolloston MP (Chair of the Health Committee) defected from the Leave campaign and is now with Remain. Could we add that in to any topics/questions?[/bQUOTE]
    Do you do a two sided argument?
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    evaluation/significance of constitutional reforms from 1979 or to be really horrible something about post 2010 constitutional reform only or how does the constitution limit government power

    parliament something about how does it hold government to account/scrutinise//argument for parliament reform or just the lords chamber or 'parliament is an irrelevant institution'

    pm and cabinet: im hoping for power, dreaded question would be about the cabinet today

    judiciary: something about echr and a british bill of rights or about if civil liberties are under threat
    How would you answer "to what extent are civil liberties under threat?"


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    How effectively does the judiciary hold gov to account?

    Also points against PLEASEEEEEE IM RUNNING OUT OF TIME


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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    How would you answer "to what extent are civil liberties under threat?"


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    wouldnt ask that because there isnt enough to talk about.

    if its civil liberties, and its unlikely because it was last year, it will be something about whether ministers or judges should protect them.

    i predicted for judiciary it will either be power or neutrality/independence
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    (Original post by JamieHarris1998)
    I think that the source takes longer because unlike in unit 1 we can't get straight into it

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    That's why, if I know the 40 marker I'm doing it first and just gonna bang it out then have time to actually read the source.

    However, if they screw me over on the 40..... Mate..... I'm praying that just one of my revision choices comes up in section a so I have 1 to fall back on in section b


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    GUYS what would your points be for 'how important has cabinet been in recent years'?? I know their strengths, but not recent years?




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    haha lool thank you! GOOD LUCK FOR TODAY! you know your stuff and you'll do so well!! i completely agree! I'll message the thread after my exams and we can all update each other on our results I wish everyone all the best - this thread has been phenomenal and it shows how teamwork can really get us far in revision !!
    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    youre so up to date! i dont know anything about it but im glad you do
    so do i!!
    somehow i think we should all keep in contact and see what we all got for results?xx
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    What time is everyone sitting this exam at? Also PREDICTIONS please!!!!
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    How would you answer "to what extent are civil liberties under threat?"


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    this is the plan we got taught

    gov response to terrorism:
    - area of conflict over human rights act
    - privacy, freedom to religion, fair trial, racial discrimination, freedom of expression
    - 2016 draft communications bill/snoopers charters
    - undermine civil liberties

    limits to gov terrorism points:
    - 1998 - human rights act- incorporated into our law, major protection of civil liberties
    - limits by commons and lords
    - bedroom tax- discrimination against disabled children

    assessment:
    - lords relatively weak
    - HRA could be overturned
    - majority unlikely to oppose gov- high threat

    gov and parliamentary laws:
    - can pass laws which may be seen as a restriction of civil liberties
    - dangers of parliamntary sovereignty
    - random stop and search, requirement to work for benefits

    judicial review:
    - court can review lawfulness of decision making process of a public body
    - various statutory requirements
    - this does not involve reviewing the conclusion of the decision

    ultr vires:
    - court can decide that a minsiter has acted beyond the power given to them by the law
    - a minister has not 'broken' an existing law, they have simply done something which the law does not give them power to do

    assessment:
    - jr and uv have successfull led to the protections of civil liberties
    - parliamentary sovereignty can be used to overturn judicial decisions changing law
    - but overturns are limited due to negative public opinion, parliamentary response, respect of the law

    HRA reform:
    conservatives want british bol - written in 2015 manifesto
    - wrong rights/sovereignty

    a protected act?
    -limited by membership of echr, limited by membership of eu
    - strong parliamentary support- labour, snp, lib dem, some conservatives also concerned about dropping HRA

    assessment:
    -it may fail to be repealed
    - this would not necessarily lead to major reduction in rights protection
    - postponed legislature rwice, only majority of 11

    judiciary - power vs willingness:
    - willingness of judges to protect civil liberties
    - judges have the power to interpretation
    - 2015 - random stop and search powers - said it was racially discriminating

    conclusion:
    - high number of threats to civil liberties
    - extent of the seriousness of those threats is debatable
    -liberal versus conservative approaches
    -comparison with other countries gives useful measure

    heres a whole plan i copied this essay plan and i managed to get an a even though i never engaged with lessons about judiciary so it sshould help!
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    [QUOTE=xxvine;65590159]
    (Original post by UKStudent17)
    For 'checking executive power', I have:

    -> Question Time. (E.g. PMQs, Ministerial Question Time)
    -> House of Lords. (E.g. Tax Credit Reforms rejected)
    -> Committees. (E.g. Health Committee)
    -> Legislative Powers (E.g. Vote of no confidence)
    -> Backbench Rebellions. (E.g. Gay Marriage; 134 Tories rebelled)

    Would these be any good? I've always assumed 'checking' essentially means 'controlling' executive power.

    Also, Sarah Wolloston MP (Chair of the Health Committee) defected from the Leave campaign and is now with Remain. Could we add that in to any topics/questions?[/bQUOTE]
    Do you do a two sided argument?
    You would, I imagine. It'd probably be to do with the effectiveness, so give two sides to them. For example, backbench rebellions are effective in giving a direct message to the government that what they're doing isn't popular, and in many cases forces them to revise their legislation. However, they're also an ineffective method because most of the time, MPs vote with the party because of the whip system, thus showing that personal beliefs tend to be overruled by the agendas of the government, which subsequently enhances the power of the executive.
 
 
 
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