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Why do all the kids these days omit "to"? Watch

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    Never in my life have I seen that, but now I have. Thank you very much.
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    (Original post by chinaberry)
    Where I'm from it's not really a 'Rah' thing, more a plastic thing...
    ahh right odd that I find both 'Rahs' and plastics are hot as they are annoying. Some just have suuuch massive egos, it's funny
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    noones ever said it where ive lived , or i never noticed it at least (cheshire surrey hampshire dorset)

    my family who live in yorkshire say stuff like that though -.-
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    Probably a london thing, I understand correct grammar at the appropiate situations but informal language doesn't necessarily have to be grammatically correct neither would I frown upon it.
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    (Original post by |_0ST)
    this has nothing to do with the thread, but i LOVE your signature picture thingy magicy! made me smile

    thanks
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    People do that around here.
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    I live in east London, and I hear a lot of yobs talk like this.
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    Because they are filthy chavs
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    yes this is a london thing definitely! i often hear - 'you coming shop?'
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      (Original post by Arekkusu)
      have people always said things like
      the usage has an interesting parallel: most people i know would say "i'm going home".
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      (Original post by Kolya)
      the usage has an interesting parallel: most people i know would say "i'm going home".
      good point, but after a bit of thinking I've realised "home" is a preposition, NOT a noun, like you can say "I'm going there/away/back".

      Compare it with the French chez moi, it's derived from "house" (cf. casa) but is definitely a preposition.
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      (Original post by Arekkusu)
      Now I'm not usually ever some sort of grammar Nazi and certainly not a linguistic prescriptivist, but have people always said things like I'm going shop or come train station tonight or I've never been Scotland?

      It annoys me a bit.
      I've never heard that but in yorkshire we tend to say 'to' and miss 'the' lol
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      (Original post by Baula)
      I've never heard that but in yorkshire we tend to say 'to' and miss 'the' lol
      Linguistically you don't, it's still retained as a glottal stop. This is a London rudeboy thing.

      Or ting.
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      (Original post by Arekkusu)
      Linguistically you don't, it's still retained as a glottal stop. This is a London rudeboy thing.

      Or ting.
      I haven't studied Eng lang at A-level so from what I've just read about glottal stops, do you mean that we say t'shops for example?
      What I meant was that instead of saying something like "Shut the door" we might say "Shut door"
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      (Original post by Baula)
      I haven't studied Eng lang at A-level so from what I've just read about glottal stops, do you mean that we say t'shops for example?
      What I meant was that instead of saying something like "Shut the door" we might say "Shut door"
      yeah, more or less, but if you think of a different example like "open (t') door", your voice will probably still do a little stop before door to signify there's meant to be a "the" there. Compare it to when you say "there's an open door in my house"

      The reason I say use a different example is because shut already ends in a "stop consonant" so the difference wouldn't be so obvious.
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      (Original post by No Man)
      I think it's a regional thing.
      i think it is a regional thing coz where i come from ppl speak lyk that all the time, in fact i speak lyk that. its just a case of wots easier to say, ppl still get ur drift. having said that i dnt think ive herd ppl from other places speak lyk that so yh i wuld say its a regional thing
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      Ahh people do that all the time here in Manchester..

      Usually my linguistic archaism would force me to be disgusted, but this one really is a time/breath-saver.
      I don't mind it so much unless it's accompanied by faux-northernness in an attempt to sound more like some kind of country badass. (A surprisingly common sight in my incredibly middle-class 6th form.)
      It's when people start writing it down that I feel like FUUUUUUUUU-.
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      It's an Americanism. That's grammatically correct over there, going by American authors who despite otherwise perfect in their grammar, omit the 'to'.

      I never do it. It doesn't make sense to me.


      The other thing is "Go [omitted AND] get me a drink", which you see all the time online, even by British people.
     
     
     
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