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Students. You have nothing to worry about. Watch

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    People do not worry that they wont be able to pay for the upfront fees, cos there is loans. They just worry that the increase in the amount of debt would make it harder for them to do stuffs in the future.

    I, for one, think I should be worried about it. When I finished uni I would like to get a job as soon as possible although I imagine it would be incredibly difficult. After getting a job, I have to pay back the fees, what if I want to buy a house? What if I want to start a family? What about the increase in income taxes? What about the increase in repayment if my salary rise?

    I mean, I know that each month £35 does not sound a lot. But if you earn exactly £21000 a year then you might feel that it would in a way pulling you behind a bit. My teacher is still paying backf or his uni fee and he is now nearly 40! Apparently the average income of people in this country is around £22800, it is likely that people can achieve that maount of income ater graduation! :P


    I do understand that fees may have to be raised, but dont you think £9000 fee cap is a bit too high?
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    (Original post by street.lovin')
    People do not worry that they wont be able to pay for the upfront fees, cos there is loans. They just worry that the increase in the amount of debt would make it harder for them to do stuffs in the future.

    I, for one, think I should be worried about it. When I finished uni I would like to get a job as soon as possible although I imagine it would be incredibly difficult. After getting a job, I have to pay back the fees, what if I want to buy a house? What if I want to start a family? What about the increase in income taxes? What about the increase in repayment if my salary rise?

    I mean, I know that each month £35 does not sound a lot. But if you earn exactly £21000 a year then you might feel that it would in a way pulling you behind a bit. My teacher is still paying backf or his uni fee and he is now nearly 40! Apparently the average income of people in this country is around £22800, it is likely that people can achieve that maount of income ater graduation! :P


    I do understand that fees may have to be raised, but dont you think £9000 fee cap is a bit too high?
    21000 -(35*12) = £20580 per year, after the student loan has been paid off.
    £9000 is a good idea, because the government will reduce university funding, so therefore having a higher cap will provide a better education.
    Even if your teacher is still paying his loan back, it will be a teeny amount of his actual salary (about 2% of his salary)
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    Thanks for the information
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    (Original post by CitizensUnited)
    21000 -(35*12) = £20580 per year, after the student loan has been paid off.
    You've ignored income tax and NI. £15,873 take home pay.
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    (Original post by street.lovin')
    Apparently the average income of people in this country is around £22800, it is likely that people can achieve that maount of income ater graduation! :P
    Graduates should have a higher average salary than the UK average salary.

    But yes, if people don't think their degree will improve their earnings by more than 9% of earnings over £21k they shouldn't do a degree.
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    (Original post by CitizensUnited)
    21000 -(35*12) = £20580 per year, after the student loan has been paid off.
    £9000 is a good idea, because the government will reduce university funding, so therefore having a higher cap will provide a better education.
    Even if your teacher is still paying his loan back, it will be a teeny amount of his actual salary (about 2% of his salary)
    That's wrong.

    Universities charging £9000 will increase funding.

    Its been stated several times by the BBC that this is a way for the government to cut the budget yet still make the taxpayer pay more through increased fee's. Its all a political swindle.

    Only the really low universities in academic standards will have less funding.

    Cambridge & Oxford will be money making machines now as they will definitely apply to charge between £10,000-12,000 per year for tuition fee's.

    The average course costs just £7,000 per year, therefore any university charging more than £6000 in fee's will make a profit because they still have 60% of the education budget to go on top as only 40% has been cut.

    Clegg & Cameron must think taxpayers are **** at maths, honestly. The new system is bad for the taxpayer and bad for the students. Its an epic fail.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    There are jobs about.

    I've been to the job centre and heard the lazy people turn down perfect jobs as waiters, cleaners, labourers

    Why?

    Because they thought they were too good for them and they needed something better like a more highly paid job.

    Well, guess what? I got news for you. Unless you go to university you will always start at the bottom and work your way up, even most graduates have to in fact.

    So get off your backside and go waiting, cleaning or labouring. I will have far more respect for you than I do as you are now, sat on your ass claiming JSA from the taxpayer every week.

    If people like you didn't leech from society then that tax could be used to top the education budget, the NHS budget.

    Go and get a job or set up your own business. A bit of motivation is all it needs. Stop being bone idle.
    Delete the bolded part of your post and this is a perfect post.

    You are absolutely spot-on, the OP is a complete tosser, and I remember having seen posts by him admitting to having turned down cleaning (or possibly manual labour) jobs, simply because they don't comply to his "interests". People don't seem to realise that job choice is a MASSIVE luxury, the majority of the world works whatever job they manage to find just to scrape by and survive. I wish it didn't have to be that way, but it is. I appreciate the luxury we enjoy in this part of the world but some people just take advantage of it too much.

    I am ecstatic that there are new policies being implemented to penalise people who turn down jobs.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Delete the bolded part of your post and this is a perfect post.

    You are absolutely spot-on, the OP is a complete tosser, and I remember having seen posts by him admitting to having turned down cleaning (or possibly manual labour) jobs, simply because they don't comply to his "interests". People don't seem to realise that job choice is a MASSIVE luxury, the majority of the world works whatever job they manage to find just to scrape by and survive. I wish it didn't have to be that way, but it is. I appreciate the luxury we enjoy in this part of the world but some people just take advantage of it too much.

    I am ecstatic that there are new policies being implemented to penalise people who turn down jobs.
    He could easily set up his own business though. I know someone who started on benefits and set up a business and now pays a lot of tax every year. That tax goes back into the system to cover the benefits he used to start himself off and once that's paid the rest goes to society.

    I have a lot of admiration for him.

    He put away £10 every week of his JSA for 2 and half months. Then bought in bulk and sold that on making a small profit. Kept doing it then eventually had enough to start a business and is now doing very well.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    You've ignored income tax and NI. £15,873 take home pay.
    It's still £420 / year. 2.64% of take home pay. (less than £10 / week , I'm sure it will make a massive difference)


    (Original post by jb9191)
    (Original post by Me)
    £9000 is a good idea, because the government will reduce university funding
    That's wrong.

    Universities charging £9000 will increase funding.
    My original point was that the government will reduce funding to higher education institutes, which they will do. (if they weren't, we wouldn't have the current situation).
    What do you mean by "Universities charging £9000 will increase funding"? I'm not entirely understanding that.

    Its been stated several times by the BBC that this is a way for the government to cut the budget yet still make the taxpayer pay more through increased fee's. Its all a political swindle.

    Only the really low universities in academic standards will have less funding.
    The taxpayers' money goes directly to the students, which then goes to the university.

    Cambridge & Oxford will be money making machines now as they will definitely apply to charge between £10,000-12,000 per year for tuition fee's.
    Oxbridge will have the same £9000 cap that is applied to everywhere else.

    The average course costs just £7,000 per year, therefore any university charging more than £6000 in fee's will make a profit because they still have 60% of the education budget to go on top as only 40% has been cut.

    Clegg & Cameron must think taxpayers are **** at maths, honestly. The new system is bad for the taxpayer and bad for the students. Its an epic fail.
    Universities do have costs other than providing courses, such as building maintenance, electricity & water, and research.
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    (Original post by CitizensUnited)
    It's still £420 / year. 2.64% of take home pay. (less than £10 / week , I'm sure it will make a massive difference)
    Where do you get £420/year from? surely its £540/year? (0.09 x £6,000)
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    He could easily set up his own business though. I know someone who started on benefits and set up a business and now pays a lot of tax every year. That tax goes back into the system to cover the benefits he used to start himself off and once that's paid the rest goes to society.

    I have a lot of admiration for him.

    He put away £10 every week of his JSA for 2 and half months. Then bought in bulk and sold that on making a small profit. Kept doing it then eventually had enough to start a business and is now doing very well.
    Well done to him for managing that, but starting a business is a serious life investment, and many businesses fail pretty quickly, simply because it's very difficult to get a business off the ground and find a niche to sell in. Starting a business is not a quick-fix solution to unemployment.
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    I would rather be in an extra £18,000 in debt with a degree, than refuse to pay, get a dead end job and get in debt with a mortgage in later life.
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    In McDonalds you don't toss burgers. All you really do is heat em' up.
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    (Original post by TheLloyd)
    I would rather be in an extra £18,000 in debt with a degree, than refuse to pay, get a dead end job and get in debt with a mortgage in later life.
    Degree = no mortgage does it?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Degree = no mortgage does it?
    Give you a lot better chance of not needing one.
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    (Original post by j0rd4nn)
    Give you a lot better chance of not needing one.
    Sure, if you save 10k a year (ie 13k of your gross salary) for 10 years and want to buy a dump in the north.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Where do you get £420/year from? surely its £540/year? (0.09 x £6,000)
    I got it from the £35 / month figure quoted here:
    (Original post by streetlovin)
    I mean, I know that each month £35 does not sound a lot.
    Even with £540, it's still around 3.5%, which isn't much.


    I think a lot of people are seeing "Conservative government cuts education" and jumping on the proverbial bandwagon.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I'm getting tired of seeing and hearing about these tuition fee cuts and student protests.

    THERE ARE BIGGER THINGS GOING ON IN THE WORLD

    Yes. There are.

    Ok. Granted that this is a student forum, but look:
    This is where you fail. This is a STUDENT forum full of STUDENTS. Therefore cuts in tuition fees are very very likely to be one of the hottest topic discussed here. It doesn't mean that its the most important thing happening. Its just the most relevant to the people who are posting in here.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    Yes. Many of my debts (but not all) are my own fault, but you won't see me protesting against the unfairness of paying a £350 court fine when a tv licence only costs £145. Why can't I pay a £50 fine for not having a tv licence? Why £350? Is that fair for someone who's income is currently less than £55 per week?

    There is nothing fair in this society. I understand that. Maybe the protesting students should understand that too.
    Here's an idea; if you can't afford a TV license, don't watch TV. You have the internet, browse it and get your entertainment from there. Or, better yet, use the reduced bone idle TV time to hunt for a ****ing job.
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    (Original post by CitizensUnited)
    It's still £420 / year. 2.64% of take home pay. (less than £10 / week , I'm sure it will make a massive difference)




    My original point was that the government will reduce funding to higher education institutes, which they will do. (if they weren't, we wouldn't have the current situation).
    What do you mean by "Universities charging £9000 will increase funding"? I'm not entirely understanding that.



    The taxpayers' money goes directly to the students, which then goes to the university.



    Oxbridge will have the same £9000 cap that is applied to everywhere else.



    Universities do have costs other than providing courses, such as building maintenance, electricity & water, and research.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11483638

    Note this paragraph.

    So will universities get more money?

    Universities have been struggling to meet surging demand for places. Many years of rising investment under Labour have given way to cuts as the economic climate has changed.

    The government admits that, in general, the money raised from tuition fees will simply replace major cuts to teaching budgets.

    The Browne review's conclusions were modelled on an 80% cut to teaching grants.

    Cuts of 40% to the higher education budget were announced in the spending review on 20 October 2010. But that budget includes student grants, which are unlikely to be significantly cut, as well as the teaching grant, suggesting that teaching funds are likely to face cuts much deeper than 40%.

    However, some universities may be able to charge fees high enough to enable them to increase their funding despite the budget cuts.



    Basically, those charging the top end will be able to increase funding - therefore, universities with a better reputation will make more money and continue to get better whilst the others don't - leaving an education standards gap.

    Then the lower universities will try and play catch up and ask for access to more funding which will then raise fee's so they can catch up with the top universities to avoid a massive standards gap opening.

    Universities will make more money. The only thing is that instead of increasing it through government funding (taxpayer) they are doing it directly to the university.
    This allows the government to cut funding to use it elsewhere whilst still increasing university funding - a lot of people don't even realise they will pay more tax towards education instead of other areas because of how slyly its being done.
 
 
 
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