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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    This is what I mean. I really enjoy doing research, but when you are never given adequate time to complete the research and essays properly, it takes the enjoyment out of it.



    I understand why the essays are required for Masters level credit, but the M level credit was only introduced to encourage teachers to go back to complete a Masters degree. I know very few teachers who have (of course others many know loads of teachers who have), but it should be up to you if you want to. For me, most of the MAs I'm interested in won't accept my credit, so it's useless for me anyway.

    I know several people who have completed PhDs and have said that the PGCE is worse. That is because of the lack of time to complete everything.

    It's a small gripe I have with the course. I do think the course needs to be restructured a bit, but that's me (I know others agree and some disagree), but unfortunately, if any restructuring does happen, it won't be for the better wit hthe current government's plans.

    For me, my favourite time is in the classroom. I can't wait for my NQT year!
    This is exactly how I feel. While I was collecting material for my assignment I felt that it was actually taking valuable time away from preparing material for my actual teaching!
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    (Original post by Kidders)
    Now into my 3rd month of the secondary PGCE course and i can honestly say i have never looked forward to Xmas quite as much as i currently am! This has been the hardest few months i have ever experienced. Such a massive amount of work to be done all the time. Lesson plans still taking me hours and I'm never more than a day ahead of myself! Assignment due in 2 weeks and not even beyond the introduction. Getting home at 5pm every night due to the distance of my placement school and leaving at 7:20am every morning. Weekends written off and relationship with my partner suffering!


    Anyone else feel this way too?

    Also a little reminder to all those wanting to apply for next year; this is CERTAINLY not an option for you if you're doing it just to put off finding a job! HUGE step up from undergrad degree!! (i think the MA students are a little better prepared)

    Rant over.
    You not going to like what I have to say, but you appear to be making a big deal out of nothing I mean 7.20am -5pm and studying in the evening for 5 days a week is nothing. Why are your weekends written off? What/where were you undergraduate studies in if you didn't study more than this?
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    (Original post by Altruistic1)
    Ah, fair enough. I was just thinking of my old (private) school - I'm pretty sure only 1 or 2 teachers had any sort of teaching qualification. I remember one in particular was teaching A level Biology and had come straight from a BSc. in Marine Biology. A lot of the teachers were alumni.
    Independent schools still have a higher number of teachers without QTS; however, many tend to have a Masters in their area (not that it says they can teach). If you really want to teach, you could most likely find a teaching position at one of these schools if you have a good degree from a decent uni. However, these jobs lack security. You can be fired for almost any reason. For instance, my housemate teaches at an independent school where a newly qualified teacher from another country was hired only to be fired just before xmas. The teacher was doing her job, she just needed a bit of guidance, which she was never given. The sad thing is, this school is listed on the ISC as being a school with a qualifying NQT induction.

    QTS brings more job security and better benefits and conditions. Some independent schools are great, but there are some where they will work you to death. I know someone who left saying the higher pay wasn't worth it because she was basically living at the school.

    It's all about preference I guess.
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    I too am realising the PGCE is a tough year! BUT, I don't think any of us can say that we weren't warned?!

    I'm usually in school by 8-8.15, and leave anywhere from 4-5. Usually up doing work then til 9.30-10ish. There are times when I want to pull my hair out, but, like I said, it's what I expected. I'm happy when I'm on top of everything, which is why I always try and do things asap to get them out of the way. I think once you leave one thing, you just slowly disappear into a pile of paperwork.

    One thing I will say is that I was shocked to discover the differences in workload that some unis offer. I am in a top 5 teacher training provider, and compared to a nearby uni offering the same course, the difference is a complete JOKE. To think we come out with the same qualification!

    Chin up people
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    (Original post by Altruistic1)
    Just wondering.... why do so many people go down the PGCE route? Why not just join a private school straight after your UG? Or are there just too few jobs around for the inexperienced?
    Perhaps some of us don't want to teach the priviliged whose parents can afford to pay for their schooling, and teach other children too.

    If I was paying for my child's education, I'd be most peeved if they were employing teachers who weren't qualified, just had a degree in the subject. Having a degree doesn't make you a good teacher. (Neither does doing a PGCE to be fair, but at least it gives you some sort of idea what to do!) I know private schools CAN employ people without QTS but I didn't think many did.
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    (Original post by prin5ess)
    @ KIDDERS
    Now into my 3rd month of the secondary PGCE course and i can honestly say i have never looked forward to Xmas quite as much as i currently am! This has been the hardest few months i have ever experienced. Such a massive amount of work to be done all the time. Lesson plans still taking me hours and I'm never more than a day ahead of myself! Assignment due in 2 weeks and not even beyond the introduction. Getting home at 5pm every night due to the distance of my placement school and leaving at 7:20am every morning. Weekends written off and relationship with my partner suffering!


    OMG this is scary! I have applied at bham for a pgce and this sounds pretty much like what their course is like ... intense! Oh I will be studying for an English PGCE too. Just wanted to know are you doing your pgce at the uni of bham? Do things get easier by the second placement? Did you have to do aprimary observation at the beginning of your pgce for a wk? If so whats the relevance of that? Good luck with everything x

    Every PGCE is intense, that is the whole point and nature of it!
    By second placement you have the handle on planning etc and get used to it, but your timetable goes up and you are expected to be a bit more independent.
    Everyone who trains in secondary school has to have a primary observational experience. Personally i had to get two weeks before i started my course. The relevance is to see your subject taught at primary, to see and experience what the pupils go through before they get to you and you are trainining to become a teacher not just a teacher OF ...... of secondary teacher. It is good to have all the experience possible at all levels.
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    (Original post by zcomputer5)
    You not going to like what I have to say, but you appear to be making a big deal out of nothing I mean 7.20am -5pm and studying in the evening for 5 days a week is nothing. Why are your weekends written off? What/where were you undergraduate studies in if you didn't study more than this?
    Reading what others have said about the PGCE i don't think i'm making a big deal out of nothing. As I have mentioned in subsequent posts it is not the hours. I have worked long shifts before whilst at Uni and during my summer holidays. It is the amount of 'stuff' we have to process, take on board, adapt to all relatively unaided which is the most difficult. The hours do not help, however if it was just an office job or working in retail the hours would be nothing. I have previously worked in both sectors so not slating them, just stating that they require very little thought and therefore less stressful/ difficult.

    Weekends are written off as it is when i'm doing lesson plans for the following weeks, doing essays or catching up on the ridiculous amounts of paperwork we have!

    My degree was in English lit and yes we had essays and lots of reading, but I only had 8hours of contact time per week and therefore had plenty of time to do the uni work and hold down a 22hour per week job. Even when i did my dissertation it was only that and one or two essays to focus on. Not lesson plans for 4-5 classes a day, resources for the classes, lesson evaluations, reflective journals, various standards tracking sheets- not to mention having to get your head around managing teenagers and unhelpful teaching staff!!

    I'm back on Monday though so hoping a few weeks at Uni will be a welcomed relief! Just wish we had been given lessons and other work to prepare over Xmas and maybe catch up a little bit!
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    (Original post by zcomputer5)
    You not going to like what I have to say, but you appear to be making a big deal out of nothing I mean 7.20am -5pm and studying in the evening for 5 days a week is nothing. Why are your weekends written off? What/where were you undergraduate studies in if you didn't study more than this?
    I've never heard of an undergrad who worked those hours. Personally, at the moment, I am working from 8, when I arrive at school, until about 9pm, when I start getting ready to go to bed, with a break for some food and to get home. Weekends are at least five hours work a day, on a good weekend... to be honest, I barely did in a week the work I do in a day now for my undergrad.
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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)
    University of Cumbria, in Lancaster... did my undergrad at Lancaster Uni, and didn't want to move. You a Berwick person too?
    Hello Teao the Cat

    I am currently doing my masters in chemistry and durham and am thinking of applying to do a pgce at the university of cumbria as i live in Kendal. I have been looking at the website for the university and there is very little info on there about the course and placements etc. I just wondered what the course is like and whether you recommend the course and the university? Also which placement schools have you been in and have you found your mentor useful?

    Apologies for all the questions!

    Vicki
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    Ok this thread is really starting to scare me now! I have been accepted onto a PGCE for next year and I am far from workshy - in fact I am a bit obsessive about completing work and doing it to a good standard - but the workload for the PGCE sounds immense! I am going to be moving to a different city for my PGCE and would really like to meet new people/make friends. Is it possible to socialise and meet people when doing a PGCE or is ALL your time spent working? Sounds like a pretty miserable year!
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    (Original post by golden_bough)
    Ok this thread is really starting to scare me now! I have been accepted onto a PGCE for next year and I am far from workshy - in fact I am a bit obsessive about completing work and doing it to a good standard - but the workload for the PGCE sounds immense! I am going to be moving to a different city for my PGCE and would really like to meet new people/make friends. Is it possible to socialise and meet people when doing a PGCE or is ALL your time spent working? Sounds like a pretty miserable year!
    Hello

    I really love my PGCE at the moment. I have made some wonderful friends here in Bristol; both on and off the course. I studied in Norwich so I didnt know anyone when I came here and all my friends have remained in East Anglia/London. It is tough meeting new people, but people are very very supportive. For example, I have made friends on my course, those who I live with and those who I have met through University societies.

    Furthermore, I am an awful perfectionist! So much so that the University tutors cannot fault my planning because I do manage (somehow) to make a very good standard of plans, as well as teach good lessons (most of the time). I think because I spend a lot of my time working it is really paying off, but I do ensure I have time off. For example I met friends in the afternoon, and have tomorrow off to go to do various bits and pieces (urgent stuff) and I always take time off during the week.

    Of course the PGCE is a tough year but its about getting through it. And remember its only one year! So it is all worth it. And you will have the good times as well as the bad times!
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    (Original post by starchild)
    Hello

    I really love my PGCE at the moment. I have made some wonderful friends here in Bristol; both on and off the course. I studied in Norwich so I didnt know anyone when I came here and all my friends have remained in East Anglia/London. It is tough meeting new people, but people are very very supportive. For example, I have made friends on my course, those who I live with and those who I have met through University societies.
    How have you managed to have time to join societies??? This is something I really miss as at my undergrad uni I was very involved in two societies and was president in my final year, they were my life. But at my PGCE uni I just haven't found the time to join any societies which is a real shame.

    I think I'm the opposite to you in terms of friends too. I'm doing my PGCE in England and my undergraduate degree is from Scotland, so I didn't know anyone at all in this area when I moved here. I've really struggled with making friends because most people on my course commute and live at home with partners/family, meaning they have existing lives so aren't really looking for friendship. Some people travel for up to 2 hours if not more to get to the course meaning they can't meet up at the weekend and want to get home after we've finished at 6pm. I think one of the main difficulties is that you are hardly ever at university, meaning there are people on my course who despite all of the above, if I saw them every day for the academic year I imagine we'd be pretty good friends. However, its so ad hoc that we actually see each other that I haven't even got to the point of swapping phone numbers with most people as I see them so rarely as we're in school constantly. Essentially, I feel like I know a lot of people and I get on fine with them but I don't know anyone in a close enough way that I'd contact them if I were having a crisis with the course/my school. I've always had a group of close, best friends, here I don't.

    Part of the above is my own fault though because I haven't really felt the need to settle down here as I have no real plans to live here beyond July, the only reason I would is if a job came up in one of my placement schools. I've just focused on seeing my friends from school/uni as we're all in the London area now and also, seeing my boyfriend on the odd occasion as he still lives in Scotland... so in that respect, I haven't overly helped myself on the making friends front as it hasn't been an instant package like it was at undergrad!
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    How have you managed to have time to join societies??? This is something I really miss as at my undergrad uni I was very involved in two societies and was president in my final year, they were my life. But at my PGCE uni I just haven't found the time to join any societies which is a real shame.
    I allowed myself to join one or two socieities which would help me relax. For example I joined the Labour Society (and I really do hardly anything with them) and then I joined TUBBS which is a choir. I joined the latter because singing really does help me relax and I really think it is integral to how I live my life.
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    How have you managed to have time to join societies??? This is something I really miss as at my undergrad uni I was very involved in two societies and was president in my final year, they were my life. But at my PGCE uni I just haven't found the time to join any societies which is a real shame.

    I think I'm the opposite to you in terms of friends too. I'm doing my PGCE in England and my undergraduate degree is from Scotland, so I didn't know anyone at all in this area when I moved here. I've really struggled with making friends because most people on my course commute and live at home with partners/family, meaning they have existing lives so aren't really looking for friendship. Some people travel for up to 2 hours if not more to get to the course meaning they can't meet up at the weekend and want to get home after we've finished at 6pm. I think one of the main difficulties is that you are hardly ever at university, meaning there are people on my course who despite all of the above, if I saw them every day for the academic year I imagine we'd be pretty good friends. However, its so ad hoc that we actually see each other that I haven't even got to the point of swapping phone numbers with most people as I see them so rarely as we're in school constantly. Essentially, I feel like I know a lot of people and I get on fine with them but I don't know anyone in a close enough way that I'd contact them if I were having a crisis with the course/my school. I've always had a group of close, best friends, here I don't.

    Part of the above is my own fault though because I haven't really felt the need to settle down here as I have no real plans to live here beyond July, the only reason I would is if a job came up in one of my placement schools. I've just focused on seeing my friends from school/uni as we're all in the London area now and also, seeing my boyfriend on the odd occasion as he still lives in Scotland... so in that respect, I haven't overly helped myself on the making friends front as it hasn't been an instant package like it was at undergrad!
    When I was training I didn't do anything social for the first term, realised it was making me depressed and after Xmas joined an opera group! It was the best thing I did.
    I also moved away from home to train, and I totally understand the lack of friends thing! I defo recommend you to join some kind of social group :yep:
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    (Original post by starchild)
    Hello

    I really love my PGCE at the moment. I have made some wonderful friends here in Bristol; both on and off the course. I studied in Norwich so I didnt know anyone when I came here and all my friends have remained in East Anglia/London. It is tough meeting new people, but people are very very supportive. For example, I have made friends on my course, those who I live with and those who I have met through University societies.

    Furthermore, I am an awful perfectionist! So much so that the University tutors cannot fault my planning because I do manage (somehow) to make a very good standard of plans, as well as teach good lessons (most of the time). I think because I spend a lot of my time working it is really paying off, but I do ensure I have time off. For example I met friends in the afternoon, and have tomorrow off to go to do various bits and pieces (urgent stuff) and I always take time off during the week.

    Of course the PGCE is a tough year but its about getting through it. And remember its only one year! So it is all worth it. And you will have the good times as well as the bad times!
    This reassures me a bit, but how do you manage to find the time to socialise/attend societies etc on top of placement, lesson planning, writing assignments etc? I'm worried that I won't be able to fit it all in!
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    (Original post by golden_bough)
    This reassures me a bit, but how do you manage to find the time to socialise/attend societies etc on top of placement, lesson planning, writing assignments etc? I'm worried that I won't be able to fit it all in!
    I always make sure I have time off. I go to TUBBS because singing relaxes me and therefore I can always spend 2 hours singing to help me relax.
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    (Original post by golden_bough)
    This reassures me a bit, but how do you manage to find the time to socialise/attend societies etc on top of placement, lesson planning, writing assignments etc? I'm worried that I won't be able to fit it all in!
    I got so stressed during my training year I actually went to the doctor about it. His reply was:"I play tennis in my free time. When I feel myself getting down or stressed, do you know what I do? Play more tennis." He was 100% right and I'm so glad I listened to that rather than beg for a drug to help me (that's what I originally intended to do!)

    For me "tennis" was taking regular exercise (jogging) and joining a choir/opera group. It really is important, and you'll find that if you take a few hours to yourself a week, the hours you are working will be more productive! It's an easy trap to fall into, sacking off giving yourself time to relax, but if you do that to do work you'll probably just end up procrastinating anyway.

    Play more tennis.
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    I meant to reply to these a few days ago, sorry...

    (Original post by Becca)
    When I was training I didn't do anything social for the first term, realised it was making me depressed and after Xmas joined an opera group! It was the best thing I did.
    I also moved away from home to train, and I totally understand the lack of friends thing! I defo recommend you to join some kind of social group :yep:
    The problem is finding out where there actually is something! The teachers at my school are starting some sort of keep fit/aerobics group after school one night which I might join although I don't have the weight loss intentions they do, but the annoying thing is I finish at this school in a month so that is only a temporary solution!

    I might try and find some kind of volunteering as this is the first time in my life where I haven't done any volunteer work. I feel a bit like I did on my year abroad - a temporary resident in a community where I can't really break into and properly live in... but then I had a brilliant social life and lots of friends in our international bubble to compensate, whereas here I don't. I have the added issue in that my boyfriend is still in Scotland so we see each other every weekend, even further limiting my chances of getting involved in a weekend activity!

    Did you stay where you were for more than a year? Was your choir after school or at the weekend?

    (Original post by starchild)
    I allowed myself to join one or two socieities which would help me relax. For example I joined the Labour Society (and I really do hardly anything with them) and then I joined TUBBS which is a choir. I joined the latter because singing really does help me relax and I really think it is integral to how I live my life.
    I really really wish I was at a university where societies were a big thing. I've gone from a very society orientated university with Edinburgh to a very low key "local" university where nothing really happens at all and the campus is about as big as one building was at Edinburgh... I think they have a football team and that's about it. There is nothing like the amount of student engagement I was used to in my undergraduate degree but I suppose I need to join the adult world and look for things beyond those offered to students.
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    [QUOTE=zcomputer5;29399692]

    I went to the University of Southampton, did English Lit and got a high 2:1. I'm unsure why you are shocked I could work 22 hours a week? I did 10 hours on a Saturday and then either one full day and an evening during the week or two longer evening shifts.

    I wasn't in uni that much because I did English, which has very low contact time. Even doing 22hrs part-time work I still had plenty of time to do my reading, write essays, presentations, do research and in final year my dissertation.

    Currently I am doing a PGCE and obviously don't have time for a part-time job, hence the thread
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    (Original post by Kidders)
    x
    They were trolling and nothing more to try and provoke some kind of justification from you/others.
    I got the posts removed.
 
 
 
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