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    The Turn of the Screw. The ending just confused the hell out of me. Although, after I watched some adaptations of the book (albeit it contradicting endings - one he falls down dead, another he's murdered) I feel like I understand it more. It's meant to be confusing.
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    (Original post by doloroushazy)
    I had no noble aspersions, I'd read somewhere that you'll learn all you need to know in life from the Brothers Karamazov and picked it up and ran with it... do you think I ought to try to read it again? is it a big undertaking?
    I think it's just that Russian literature can take a while to get into, you also need to know a lot of the social history behind it. A lot depends on the translation too. And get past all the patronymics and diminutives, and so on...

    It really is a great book, I would recommend trying it again. Though you might want to read Crime and Punishment first, as it's a bit more accessible.

    (Original post by doloroushazy)
    ahah what is wrong with philosophy in the bedroom?
    What's not wrong with it? You think that ****'s okay? :hmmm:

    I actually looked up the wikipedia article in response to this thread, brought back a load of trauma I didn't need. :sad:
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    I think it's just that Russian literature can take a while to get into, you also need to know a lot of the social history behind it. A lot depends on the translation too. And get past all the patronymics and diminutives, and so on...

    It really is a great book, I would recommend trying it again. Though you might want to read Crime and Punishment first, as it's a bit more accessible.



    What's not wrong with it? You think that ****'s okay? :hmmm:

    I actually looked up the wikipedia article in response to this thread, brought back a load of trauma I didn't need. :sad:
    HAH just wikipedia'd it, saw Marquis de Sade, that told me all I needed to know. I actually really want to read 120 Days of Sodom (**** knows why)
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    Life of Pi - Yann Martel: I loved it right up to the island of poisonous seaweed inhabited by mongoose. That bit really made absolutely no sense at all, not even within the context of the boy's imagination.

    Kafka on the Shore - Harukia Murkami: Most of it is plain ol' pretentious drivel, but then there's the incest (where he's not really sure if the woman is his mother, but for no apparent reason he thinks she is and she seems to think she is too, but they still go ahead with it regardless) and raping a girl in her dreams? It's just weird with no point to it at all.
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    (Original post by rylit91)
    I'm on the verge of completing Mrs Dalloway, and quite frankly am puzzled. I knew I wouldn't be able to make much sense of it without reading extra material devoted entirely to its meanings and themes, but has anyone else had this?

    More specifically, can anyone enlighten me on Mrs Dalloway?

    ARRGHGHG I nearly exploded with excitement when reading this. Mrs Dalloway is a masterpiece that needs attention and careful unlocking. It's important to read it within the context of the war and the idea that although everyone was so isolated by their own suffering...it also connected them in a way- which is represented through the crazy weaving narrative structure. I'd love to sit down and have a coffee-discussion about this...I've just had an interview at Cambridge about the very thing- it's one of the most exciting books in the English language for me- it's so dynamic and original. I was like "What?!" when i first read it too...but I think it takes some doing, a lot of critical reading and patience to really ...'get it' if you have any specific questions on it though I'd be happy to supply my notions
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    "The Resurrectionist" by James Bradely. Couldn't follow it at all.
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    (Original post by EffDee)
    ARRGHGHG I nearly exploded with excitement when reading this. Mrs Dalloway is a masterpiece that needs attention and careful unlocking. It's important to read it within the context of the war and the idea that although everyone was so isolated by their own suffering...it also connected them in a way- which is represented through the crazy weaving narrative structure. I'd love to sit down and have a coffee-discussion about this...I've just had an interview at Cambridge about the very thing- it's one of the most exciting books in the English language for me- it's so dynamic and original. I was like "What?!" when i first read it too...but I think it takes some doing, a lot of critical reading and patience to really ...'get it' if you have any specific questions on it though I'd be happy to supply my notions
    Well, 8 pages to go. Although at this stage it is still locked, as you say, I must say that superficially, so to speak, I have enjoyed it. So far, my favourite part is when I sit down to read it and you kind of slip into it. I love the intimacy of the stream of consciousness that she makes such wonderful use of. Although this is my first Woolf novel, I have already bought A Room of One's Own, and could go so far as to suggest she might just be one of my favourite authors. I've listened to her read extracts of her essays on youtube and I love how she writes and what she writes; I intend on quoting her in my PS on several occasions.

    That said, Mrs Dalloway has, at some stages, made me question my intelligence and whether I genuinely do love reading. This, however, is because I've thrown myself in at the Virginia Woolf, and general literary deep end.

    Can you recommend any good critical reading on it?
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    (Original post by rylit91)
    Well, 8 pages to go. Although at this stage it is still locked, as you say, I must say that superficially, so to speak, I have enjoyed it. So far, my favourite part is when I sit down to read it and you kind of slip into it. I love the intimacy of the stream of consciousness that she makes such wonderful use of. Although this is my first Woolf novel, I have already bought A Room of One's Own, and could go so far as to suggest she might just be one of my favourite authors. I've listened to her read extracts of her essays on youtube and I love how she writes and what she writes; I intend on quoting her in my PS on several occasions.

    That said, Mrs Dalloway has, at some stages, made me question my intelligence and whether I genuinely do love reading. This, however, is because I've thrown myself in at the Virginia Woolf, and general literary deep end.

    Can you recommend any good critical reading on it?
    I'm a Woolf nut by the way so you've come to the right person! I literally don't think it would be a Woolf novel if it didn't make you question your intelligence haha! YES a fantastic book to get is this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mrs-Dalloway...2025515&sr=8-1 It's really the best book of Woolf criticism I've ever read- and I've read a few!

    I'd suggest reading "To the Lighthouse" next, it's supposedly her "best" one...but i prefer Mrs Dalloway.
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    (Original post by doloroushazy)
    HAH just wikipedia'd it, saw Marquis de Sade, that told me all I needed to know. I actually really want to read 120 Days of Sodom (**** knows why)
    Have you seen the film? It's well made if horrifying (I was a disturbed child.) I haven't had the courage to read it yet though.

    If anyone turned me into back to Catholicism, it was De Sade. :sad:
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    (Original post by EffDee)
    I'm a Woolf nut by the way so you've come to the right person! I literally don't think it would be a Woolf novel if it didn't make you question your intelligence haha! YES a fantastic book to get is this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mrs-Dalloway...2025515&sr=8-1 It's really the best book of Woolf criticism I've ever read- and I've read a few!

    I'd suggest reading "To the Lighthouse" next, it's supposedly her "best" one...but i prefer Mrs Dalloway.
    I intended on reading To the Lighthouse next, but then decided to go in chronological order with The Voyage Out in the hope I might be able to grasp 'it' better; but I think I'll take your advice.

    Thanks for that book - definitely be buying it!
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    (Original post by TVC15)
    I'm the same I'm very iffy about film adaptions (and occasionally stage). They're never going to match the book, nor will they ever compete with my imagination and what I picture it. Saying that I'm curious to see how other people interpret texts, their visions and how they feel the characters. They had a stage adaption of 1984 in Kingston a few weeks ago and I'd have loved to have seen how they'd perform that. I think I read somewhere that there was a production of A Clockwork Orange at the Edingburgh Fringe Festival and I imagine that would have been very interesing to see!

    I think I've only really dipped my toes in this genre but i'm putting together a list of all the books I need/want to read! I haven't got round to VALIS yet!

    Oh goodness me! If it would be anything it would be this! There's a few modules for the MA in lit. that I think would be amazing to do, like 'Reading the Vampire: Science, Sexuality and Alterity in Modern Culture' and 'Sex. Class and Violence: Studies in Literature and Film'. I think they'd be awesome if a contrast to dystopian lit. Don't know if I could keep going for an MA though!

    Blimey you sound like you had your work cut out for you! Kept you busy at least! Ha!

    I've a question for you (although I can already guess your answer), do you think it's paradoxical that people are moved by fiction, even though it's not actually real? It losely relates to an essay I'm doing, sort of a branch of it in another direction. The same goes with horror and tragedy. Do you think we can enjoy and find pleasure in watching a horror film or a tragic play? I'm just curious to hear your views on it really!

    For my guilty pleasures.. well. I do rather like the film Labyrinth. Or maybe love. It's pretty awful but at the same time awesome! And my book it stems from my obession with Phantom of the Opera. A woman called Susan Kay wrote a book called Phantom and I was captivated by it. She's given Erik a complete backstory, I love her version of Erik, I feel I can really feel the character. For both I frequently read peoples fanfiction on them..
    I saw Mort on stage last night. Acted well, directed as well as can be, just not meant to be a play and it showed. Thankfully it did not ruin the book as it was too different. I would love to see A Clockwork Orange live. Like Mort it would not ruin it if it was bad, but it might work. Although who can match Malcolm McDowells performance?

    Enjoy VALIS.....I just really hope they never make a film of it.

    I would love to work on dystopian literature. I have been working on a few ideas of late, but I want to ensure that they are right before I put pen to paper, well fingers to keyboard. I always try to avoid having my ideas influenced by other writers, although I have to say that **** can inspire but not taint. I saw an MA in alternative works, I am sure that something exists.

    Good question. Okay so my first impression is that it is not a paradox. In the mind everything relates to the interpretation of reality. I know there is a school of thought that we perceive nothing as it really is, rather about how we see it. Therefore I would say on initial feeling that we would find it hard to distinguish between a real situation and a fictional situation as they are both interpreted rather than directly viewed,

    Now on more thought I would also say that we place ourselves vicariously in the shoes of the characters in the book. Often more in the characters whose eyes the story is written from or those that share the same values as ourselves.

    Maybe we might end up feeling more empathy for a fictional character as we can see more into their world as the voyeur/reader than we do real people that we see only part of in the outside world. Also we would often seek out books that share the same values as ourselves. I just realised that it is rare I feel any emotion or connection to a character from a Burrows books because they are so far removed that I do not have a similar belief structure.

    For horror and tragedy. I would not say that I get pleasure as such from it. More the rush. Horror you would have the ability to undergo the sensation of fear/escape/relief (even if the characters die we escape so we are relieved). We are allowed to have the adrenalin of a fight or flight situation without needing to be in the actual danger. For tragedy I guess the feeling is the same, just more about the loss. I have to admit when it comes to something like Romeo and Juliet I do not emphasise with the characters much as I find both protagonists...well, whiney! But if it is like a tragic loss then we get to go through those feelings of grief without needing to actually lost anyone.

    Okay and finally guilty pleasures. Yours were not that bad. I suppose that means that I need to think of one. This is really guilty but Dude Wheres my Car actually was amusing and I loved The Shield. But 1984, Brave New World or The Hurt Locker win out.
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    Ulysses.
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    l'etranger, by Camus, lol.

    also Gravity's rainbow by pynchon
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    Eh. I never felt the need to understand 'Mrs Dalloway'. It was just beautiful and touching, at the time I read it there just didn't seem to be need for me to have any other reactions to it.
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    (Original post by Law123mus)
    Nice ass!

    Is he yours?
    Sadly not, he lives in France :sad:

    You made that post on my birthday
 
 
 
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