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    lol at this whole thread.

    I think when your dad said low tax he meant low taxable benefit rather than road tax hence why (probably) he picked an Ibiza last time when he could have supposedly had anything.
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    (Original post by Cortez)
    lol at this whole thread.

    I think when your dad said low tax he meant low taxable benefit rather than road tax hence why (probably) he picked an Ibiza last time when he could have supposedly had anything.
    That is my point, if you could have anything then you may as well get a Veyron SS!
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    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    If you could get any car but you have to pay the tax only then why not get a Vanquish? I'm on a business policy, therefore I can drive anything [as the policy states] and as I have previously mentioned... if you only have to pay the tax then what is stopping you from getting a Vanquish, Murcielago or a Ferrari 458?
    Is business policy the same as a company policy? Maybe the quote below answer the question...?
    And also because if I crashed a Vanquish, seeing as it's tax payer's money, I think I would be front page news surely? Lol. The whole expenses scandals all over again. lol.

    (Original post by Cortez)
    lol at this whole thread.

    I think when your dad said low tax he meant low taxable benefit rather than road tax hence why (probably) he picked an Ibiza last time when he could have supposedly had anything.
    I think that's the tax I mean. Like the extra tax for company cars is that right? Like Road tax isn't the problem.. we've had better cars than an Ibiza both just not on company policies.
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    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    That is my point, if you could have anything then you may as well get a Veyron SS!
    I just googled company car tax. Basically, there is another tax which is a percentage of the car's price when brought and it's C02 emissions. So it does depend on the car.
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    (Original post by Nick Longjohnson)
    I couldn't reply because I had an exam today to study for. Hopefully this is a substantial response to satisfy you.

    Modern diesels are very clean and efficient. Historically diesel engines are loud and smoky, this is not the case any more. For a daily driven vehicle (one that you're not going to rev to the limit every day) it is very advantageous to drive a diesel.

    Reasons: More low end torque. Lower fuel consumption (higher thermodynamic efficiency due to higher compression ratio), and also the fuel is cheaper.

    What you're talking about 'dirty' is probably referring to carbon build up in the engine, and the characteristic black smoke out of the exhaust. This is mainly a product of fuel constituents, and of uncombusted fuel in the colder regions of the combustion chamber. The particulate filters capture all this crap, and dont release it to the atmosphere, and periodically burns that using a little fuel. Other gases might be crap like nitrogen oxide, which is reduced through catalytic converters and urea injection in the exhaust stream.

    'Opinions' dont mean **** all when it comes to technical details, so if you do not know anything about the subject other than what the mechanic told you, then keep what you think to yourself. And yes, I'm saying that, in modern diesels, you're wrong. And from the looks of this thread, I dont think the girl is looking to get an '89 jetta.

    TL;DR: lrn2diesel
    Urea injection in the exhaust stream!? When did cars start doing that? How do they store all the urea? I did not know you could do that.

    Diesel still attracts more dirt though, because it is not as refined as petrol, get a slight leak/spillage of diesel and you will have an awful mess, do it with petrol and its not a problem, it evaporates.

    Fuel economy with diesel is somewhat subjective, although the overall efficiency of diesel is higher than the otto cycle, the downside is that the exhaust is much more damaging, agreed that DPF and cats have gone a long way to lowering this but diesel is inherently still more 'dirty' than petrol. It is less refined!

    Petrol hybrids are starting to get good mpg, and the new turbo and supercharged small capacity petrols are combining usable power over a wide rev range with economy round town, a better compromise than diesel.

    You get all the power in a diesel in one massive lump, the torque is nice but not really required in a normal car. The VW TFSI units make a lot more sense to me.

    Modern diesels are very good, but one should not discount petrol either, for it is still a vastly superior in cleanliness and complete burn than diesel.

    Diesels have their place, but one should not forget the downsides either. And different cycles strengths.
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    Is business policy the same as a company policy? Maybe the quote below answer the question...?
    And also because if I crashed a Vanquish, seeing as it's tax payer's money, I think I would be front page news surely? Lol. The whole expenses scandals all over again. lol.


    I think that's the tax I mean. Like the extra tax for company cars is that right? Like Road tax isn't the problem.. we've had better cars than an Ibiza both just not on company policies.
    Business policy = company policy. Since my father owns the business, I call it business policy. If you crashed the Vanquish, how would anybody know that you're driving that car which is being paid for by the public? Nobody would know.

    Its like if I went to my fathers business tomorrow and there was a Lamborghini in there... and I said " I want to take it for a spin" and end up crashing it, people will think " oh he is just a rich kid"... nobody would have a clue!
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    You can never go wrong with a japanese import. 3000GT? FTO? Supra? Maybe even an Evo?
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    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    Business policy = company policy. Since my father owns the business, I call it business policy. If you crashed the Vanquish, how would anybody know that you're driving that car which is being paid for by the public? Nobody would know.

    Its like if I went to my fathers business tomorrow and there was a Lamborghini in there... and I said " I want to take it for a spin" and end up crashing it, people will think " oh he is just a rich kid"... nobody would have a clue!
    I don't know.. it's just what my mum says... But there is a department that deals with the car insurances or whatever, dad gets embarrassed when he has to explain to them that it was my mother speeding or me scratching and denting a jag and our own car.. lol.
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    (Original post by vahik92)
    when i said harder to keep clean, i meant that diesel makes the car engine, inside the bonnet, dirtier - not that it makes the car dirty from outside.
    What?

    My engine bay's immaculate, and it's a diesel.............
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    (Original post by Nick Longjohnson)
    I couldn't reply because I had an exam today to study for. Hopefully this is a substantial response to satisfy you.

    Modern diesels are very clean and efficient. Historically diesel engines are loud and smoky, this is not the case any more. For a daily driven vehicle (one that you're not going to rev to the limit every day) it is very advantageous to drive a diesel.

    Reasons: More low end torque. Lower fuel consumption (higher thermodynamic efficiency due to higher compression ratio), and also the fuel is cheaper.

    What you're talking about 'dirty' is probably referring to carbon build up in the engine, and the characteristic black smoke out of the exhaust. This is mainly a product of fuel constituents, and of uncombusted fuel in the colder regions of the combustion chamber. The particulate filters capture all this crap, and dont release it to the atmosphere, and periodically burns that using a little fuel. Other gases might be crap like nitrogen oxide, which is reduced through catalytic converters and urea injection in the exhaust stream.

    'Opinions' dont mean **** all when it comes to technical details, so if you do not know anything about the subject other than what the mechanic told you, then keep what you think to yourself. And yes, I'm saying that, in modern diesels, you're wrong. And from the looks of this thread, I dont think the girl is looking to get an '89 jetta.

    TL;DR: lrn2diesel
    at least of all your this argument is much acceptable and reasonable. if the case is that diesel is not dirty - although i never heard anything like you've said - you right from the start could have said this and should not have talked about stupid comments and stuff.

    and regarding opinions not meaning a ****, perhaps in here we mean opinion as the knowledge i had at the time of writing - i know technical detail matters more, but there was no technical detail whatsoever at the time of writing and therefore i was offering my knowledge about it as far as i knew at the time . and at that time, it was this argument you brought that should have been replied to my quote and not the ones that you have.
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    (Original post by chaz1992)
    You can never go wrong with a japanese import. 3000GT? FTO? Supra? Maybe even an Evo?
    Sorry just had to comment on your sig. Yesterday someone was talking about Downing College - there was a meeting thingy there or something - hadn't heard of the college beforehand. Today someone asked me where it was, had to reply saying sorry don't know. Then the bus stopped in traffic on the way home, right opposite it so I noticed where it was (obviously it's on Downing Street, :facepalm:) And now I've looked at your sig and you're applying. What am I trying to be told?
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    (Original post by .Ali.)
    The inverse snobbery on here never ceases to amaze me. Whenever someones parents do something nice for them, some members on here have a hissy fit. Jealousy isn't an attractive trait.
    Aren't you as catty as ur d.p. Meoww.

    I understand parents being nice, OP seemed to be exaggerating her fortune in a forum filled with thousands reading who get stuck with the £4k+ insurance costs:

    meaning I get free insurance. (So I'd be like insured to drive anything) I'm 17 - been driving for several months already. He lets me use his car most of the time - it's basically mine.

    You sound jealous of my "inverse snobbery" :banana2:
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    hey i have just bought a renault clio dynamique. its not fuel effecient but who cares
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    (Original post by In the looney bin)
    Aren't you as catty as ur d.p. Meoww.

    I understand parents being nice, OP seemed to be exaggerating her fortune in a forum filled with thousands reading who get stuck with the £4k+ insurance costs:

    meaning I get free insurance. (So I'd be like insured to drive anything) I'm 17 - been driving for several months already. He lets me use his car most of the time - it's basically mine.

    You sound jealous of my "inverse snobbery" :banana2:
    Exaggerating my fortune??? Wtf? I've never said anything. I've kept facts to the low as possible whilst trying to get across an accurate criteria of what I'm looking for.

    Mocking how I explain things as well isn't fair. So what if I'm a bit of a stupid/blonde girl that doesn't know much about cars - this is how I explain it because I don't technical terms for "free insurance". It's not like engineered the words to show off. All I wanted from this thread was some ideas about cars because I'm clueless about them and it's turned into a snobbery debate. If you don't like what I'm saying get out of the conversation because it's on a motoring forum section thing and not a general discussion or whatever forum.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Urea injection in the exhaust stream!? When did cars start doing that? How do they store all the urea? I did not know you could do that.

    Diesel still attracts more dirt though, because it is not as refined as petrol, get a slight leak/spillage of diesel and you will have an awful mess, do it with petrol and its not a problem, it evaporates.

    Fuel economy with diesel is somewhat subjective, although the overall efficiency of diesel is higher than the otto cycle, the downside is that the exhaust is much more damaging, agreed that DPF and cats have gone a long way to lowering this but diesel is inherently still more 'dirty' than petrol. It is less refined!

    Petrol hybrids are starting to get good mpg, and the new turbo and supercharged small capacity petrols are combining usable power over a wide rev range with economy round town, a better compromise than diesel.

    You get all the power in a diesel in one massive lump, the torque is nice but not really required in a normal car. The VW TFSI units make a lot more sense to me.

    Modern diesels are very good, but one should not discount petrol either, for it is still a vastly superior in cleanliness and complete burn than diesel.

    Diesels have their place, but one should not forget the downsides either. And different cycles strengths.
    Its been used for a while now, almost always under the name AdBlue. I know that in a MB, a 7 gallon tank lasts about 10,000 miles or so and is refilled at the dealer. Its pretty cheap so its not a big deal.

    Yep, diesel does produce soot from the high fuel/air ratio in the cooler parts of the combustion chamber, but particulate filters almost completely eliminate it.

    I see your point about the spilling thing, but lets face it, when was the last time you saw a modern car dump a load of fuel on the road except in a srs accident

    Refinement is actually pretty damn good. Go and have a drive of a 335d M sport. That thing is awesome.

    I was saying that for a daily driven car, diesels are amazingly good. And I believe that high-boost, high-compression diesel/electric hybrid with a series powertrain is where true efficiency is at. Such a system will always be more efficient than an equivalent petrol engine.

    Having said all of that, I love petrol engines, and still plan on having a collection of sports cars (Including a supercharged M3, nothing quite like flogging that at a track). I just think its stupid to use less efficient engines to get the shopping or commute to work (seeing housewives in G55 AMG's dropping kids at the nursery makes me rage ).




    (Original post by vahik92)
    at least of all your this argument is much acceptable and reasonable. if the case is that diesel is not dirty - although i never heard anything like you've said - you right from the start could have said this and should not have talked about stupid comments and stuff.

    and regarding opinions not meaning a ****, perhaps in here we mean opinion as the knowledge i had at the time of writing - i know technical detail matters more, but there was no technical detail whatsoever at the time of writing and therefore i was offering my knowledge about it as far as i knew at the time . and at that time, it was this argument you brought that should have been replied to my quote and not the ones that you have.
    Alright, cool.


    Time to chill though, theres more exams :woo:


    p.s. I'm pretty much an expert in IC engines
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    Sorry just had to comment on your sig. Yesterday someone was talking about Downing College - there was a meeting thingy there or something - hadn't heard of the college beforehand. Today someone asked me where it was, had to reply saying sorry don't know. Then the bus stopped in traffic on the way home, right opposite it so I noticed where it was (obviously it's on Downing Street, :facepalm:) And now I've looked at your sig and you're applying. What am I trying to be told?
    ok. Don't quite get what you're say by the final question
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    (Original post by chaz1992)
    ok. Don't quite get what you're say by the final question
    Lol. dw :') I'm just thinking it's a bit of a coincidence that I've never heard of this college before (btw I spend like everyday in Cambridge so I know where most the colleges are, etc) and then suddenley the college is like all around me. Maybe someone is trying to tell me I should have applied there?(that's what I meant by the question kinda). lols.
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    (Original post by Nick Longjohnson)
    Its been used for a while now, almost always under the name AdBlue. I know that in a MB, a 7 gallon tank lasts about 10,000 miles or so and is refilled at the dealer. Its pretty cheap so its not a big deal.

    Yep, diesel does produce soot from the high fuel/air ratio in the cooler parts of the combustion chamber, but particulate filters almost completely eliminate it.

    I see your point about the spilling thing, but lets face it, when was the last time you saw a modern car dump a load of fuel on the road except in a srs accident

    Refinement is actually pretty damn good. Go and have a drive of a 335d M sport. That thing is awesome.

    I was saying that for a daily driven car, diesels are amazingly good. And I believe that high-boost, high-compression diesel/electric hybrid with a series powertrain is where true efficiency is at. Such a system will always be more efficient than an equivalent petrol engine.

    Having said all of that, I love petrol engines, and still plan on having a collection of sports cars (Including a supercharged M3, nothing quite like flogging that at a track). I just think its stupid to use less efficient engines to get the shopping or commute to work (seeing housewives in G55 AMG's dropping kids at the nursery makes me rage ).

    Well yeh, it is piss! Haha!

    My Dad has a 635d and Mum has a VW 2ltr Diesel TDI thing. So I have driven them, They are perfectly adequate but I wouldn't say they were very exciting. The 635d is impressive in its power delivery, but you try and throw it round a country lane and it is pretty lame, it is a point and shoot rather than a sports saloon which BMW say it is.

    Also turbocharging gives you that excess air to increase your stoichiometric so that you can have a clean burn, so I see your point there, problem is, like you said the initial air/fuel ratio when you boot it and wait for the turbo to spool means that you get soot which is not ideal. I wonder if a small supercharger might try and reduce this whilst not sapping away too much power, with the amount of torque on a diesel, it would be interesting to see if it does aid pick up whilst reducing soot particulates.

    I am a marine diesel engineer so I am somewhat biased into having very much a love hate relationship with diesels, I can see why they are useful, but I would not want to come home and drive one. There is just something satisfying about starting up a petrol that you (I) don't get with a diesel. The BMW despite its refinement still sounds like a bag of old nails when it is cold, particularly at the moment where the block is so cold!

    Have you seen the price of the M5 recently? The 5ltr V10 version is now only worth around 20-25k, WIN!
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    (Original post by Kevmeister)
    Why not a 320d but a 118d?
    118d is significantly less powerful, and a far inferior engine.
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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    118d is significantly less powerful, and a far inferior engine.
    The thing is I could understand if you said 320d over a 318d, but given that the 320d is quite a bit heavier than the 118d there's little penalty difference wrt performance.
 
 
 
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