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    Running Ubuntu (Queue the hate).

    I find it a lot better for day-to-day things. It's a lot faster and installing new software is very simple. Nothing like a good "sudo apt-get install vlc" to get new software "sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade" once in a while is also great

    WINE is great for things like Spotify too.
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    Linux is amazing.
    Anybody who thinks Linux is hard to use/unreliable/etc. should consider the following:

    1) Most Web and other servers (require total software reliability) run CentOS, RedHat, alternative Linux distro.

    2) Ever supercomputer I can think of runs Linux.

    3) A number of states (the specific example that comes to mind is Portugal) run Linux. All school computers in Portugal must run Linux. So a 5 year old schoolchild from Portugal can figure out Linux just fine, and you at home complain it doesn't work? Nice.

    4) Finally, most military organisations I have any knowledge about run their own distributions of Linux. Security, simplicity, reliability.
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    I like the idea of Linux; it's safer and more stable, but every time I install it on a dual boot fully intending to work out how to use it I almost immediately run into problems - be it network card related (which means I can't even look up help on the internet to fix this) or something like unzipping a new form of archive, or building a network bridge between laptop and xbox, and I think to myself 'I can do all this and more incredibly easily on 7, why the hell don't I?' And then I give up and uninstall whatever distro I've tried and forget about Linux for another 6 months.

    It doesn't help that my first laptop was given to me years ago when I was 12 virus ridden and generally ****, so since that trial by fire fixing that in windows, I've always found the OS far more simple.
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    (Original post by Fallen)
    Linux is amazing.
    Anybody who thinks Linux is hard to use/unreliable/etc. should consider the following:

    1) Most Web and other servers (require total software reliability) run CentOS, RedHat, alternative Linux distro.

    2) Ever supercomputer I can think of runs Linux.

    3) A number of states (the specific example that comes to mind is Portugal) run Linux. All school computers in Portugal must run Linux. So a 5 year old schoolchild from Portugal can figure out Linux just fine, and you at home complain it doesn't work? Nice.

    4) Finally, most military organisations I have any knowledge about run their own distributions of Linux. Security, simplicity, reliability.
    I do agree with that but they don't use distros that we use, there security is much higher than we get (military servers etc)
    Not all 5 years get it they have teachers and their minds are focused on it, where as older people have more than one task at hand?

    But if you don't follow the above its still good
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    (Original post by Joker370)
    I like the idea of Linux; it's safer and more stable, but every time I install it on a dual boot fully intending to work out how to use it I almost immediately run into problems - be it network card related (which means I can't even look up help on the internet to fix this) or something like unzipping a new form of archive, or building a network bridge between laptop and xbox, and I think to myself 'I can do all this and more incredibly easily on 7, why the hell don't I?' And then I give up and uninstall whatever distro I've tried and forget about Linux for another 6 months.

    It doesn't help that my first laptop was given to me years ago when I was 12 virus ridden and generally ****, so since that trial by fire fixing that in windows, I've always found the OS far more simple.
    I can remember running into a few problems when I first started using Linux, 7-8 years ago on my first PC - most of the problems were due to *****y, cheap windows orientated hardware. E.g. 'Soft' modems.
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    I like Ubuntu. Currently on 10.10. It's so much faster than Win7 on my machine it's untrue and Wine does a reasonable job of running what I need if there's no good alternative. My only issue is that it's still not simple to make everything work. Until that's sorted, Windows will prevail.
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    I use linux on the uni computers...better than windows, i like the simplicity, but mac OS X still has it for me. Its a more polished than linux, which i think feels cheap at times.
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    (Original post by James Gregory)
    I hate it. A good proportion of network cards don't work (I have wasted literally about 50 hours of my life fighting network cards in Linux). Automatic updates regularly break the X boot sequence. It has mad-ass special moves like alt-sys-req-b and ctrl-alt-f5, which should be confined to Tekken, not operating systems. Different programs have their own clipboards, and use different keys and button presses to copy and paste. Watching a film or listening to music which isn't in an obscure format approved by open souce zealots is a severe trial. The file manager in gnome is ludicrously slow (though I think maybe you can speed it up by faffing with some options somewhere), because all l33t people use the command line for everything, obviously, and so don't care. The organisation of the filesystem is a cryptic, indecipherable mess, and to some extent isn't even standardised (/usr/share /usr/ /opt /usr/share/gnome whatever). The output of most commands at the terminal is cryptic and indecipherable. It positively encourages people to do everything in as complex a way as possible - it seems absolutely every system built in Linux ever is built on top of a mass of shell scripts filled with random funny characters and heaps of symlinks. If you're particularly unlucky, people use autotools and/or perl as well. Shared libraries are inconsistent between different Linux systems, as are install paths, making generic binary packages a nightmare. Also, it brought emacs into being.

    That was just a stream of conciousness, if I actually put my mind to it I could double the above.

    ARG I HATE LINUX
    Yet if you put the above next to the disadvantages of windows I'm sure I know which one will be larger.
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    running slackware with dwm
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    (Original post by mikeyd85)
    I like Ubuntu. Currently on 10.10. It's so much faster than Win7 on my machine it's untrue and Wine does a reasonable job of running what I need if there's no good alternative. My only issue is that it's still not simple to make everything work. Until that's sorted, Windows will prevail.
    ^^^

    Agreed. Win7 is MILES faster than the mess of an OS we call 'Vista'.

    On my laptop i dual-boot Win7 and Ubuntu. On my PC, i triple boot XP, Win7 and Ubuntu.

    The 10.10 version of Ubuntu is great, much better than the 10.09 version (or whatever version came before it, can't remember now).

    But as fast and good as linux is, it'll never beat Windows at home because:

    A) It's too complicated for most people (unless you're web browsing alone)
    B) File structure is a complete mess compared to Windows
    C) Installing files isn't a simple, click exe and it works, if you don't have a debian file, good luck
    D) Want to play games? Forget it (Similar to a mac i suppose)
    E) To get simple things working, it's a pain in the ass. E.g On Ubuntu 10.10, changing the splash screen of GRUB should be simple, but it's not GRUB anymore, it's GRUB2. Doesn't sound a big difference, but it is..


    but i still love Ubuntu and enjoy using it. Windows 7 is amazing too though, i just wish Microsoft would make the bootup times faster on their OS's by stripping out all the crap that isn't needed.
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    Kubuntu and windows 7 own all os!
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    (Original post by -Zephyr-)
    I'm currently writing this from Ubuntu 10.10. A while ago I had to re-install windows xp on my horribly slow desktop, so I decided to try installing linux as well.

    I barely ever use windows xp now... I've just got used to Ubuntu. It's way faster, more secure and incredibly customisable. The only downside is that it doesn't work easily with a lot of windows programs (mainly MS office, itunes, photoshop), but I get round that problem by dual booting.

    If I had a newer computer with windows 7 I'd probably switch to using that, but linux is excellent in the meantime, especially as it's free!
    Didn't know if someone else had already posted this but OpenOffice, Rhythmbox and a lot of photo editing software is available to solve those problems respectively. Most OpenOffice document types open on Windows computers and Rhythmbox allows you delete and add music to your iPod (although .mp4 files sometimes cause problems I've found) and you can install Photoshop on Ubuntu and use it through Wine (which I highly recommend you get).

    Compared to 7, I've heard the system is really great but I'm personally used to comfortable, secure, rolling updates of Ubuntu. That said, I'm considering trying out Slackware but I've heard they've dropped GNOME. Could anybody tell me what they use instead (I'm not a fan of KDE or Xfce if those are the only alternatives)?
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    (Original post by blueray)
    Oh wow that looks good! wont it have a slow boot time then? Or make windows slower how do I choose what I want to use?
    boot choice happens with the MBR bootloader (Win 7 bootloader). as for boot time, it's not that bad, it shouldn't be that much of a slowdown on modern hardware, and if it's legacy hardware, why are you running Windows? XP is 10 years old now, it's time to change.
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    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I have never spoken to someone, face to face, who has either successfully and smoothly installed linux first time or acquired a computer that both had linux and worked. Windows seems simpler somehow.
    http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/index

    That's what I used and I got Ubuntu up and running within a few hours (discounting download/install times).
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    (Original post by Gwalchgwyn)
    Because it doesn't work. Its just an OS without any user functionality - its basically windows without menus, toolbars, any working drivers or software support, 90% of the time you have to write a decent kernel to get stuff done and over 9000 neckbeards who complain that home users arn't using it when its so much better.

    The reason it runs smoother and "less bloated" is because theres feck all there. Its for script-kiddies who think looking for a script online to organize a directory into backwards alphabetical order means they are born hackerz.

    Yes i mad, and i dont know why.
    This is quite confusing...

    Menus are at the top. Toolbars are at the bottom. Most drivers are supported. You don't need to write anything to get a lot done.

    There's a lot there. In fact, the only thing I found missing was Thunderbird and there's Evolution as a good alternative. As someone said before, directory organisation isn't radically different to Windows.

    Does this answer your questions?

    P.S. To you previous posts; there is greater community within Linux environments than in Windows. This is probably because of the nature of the OS.
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    (Original post by Tathrim)
    boot choice happens with the MBR bootloader (Win 7 bootloader). as for boot time, it's not that bad, it shouldn't be that much of a slowdown on modern hardware, and if it's legacy hardware, why are you running Windows? XP is 10 years old now, it's time to change.
    Im using 7 not xp lol
    and ive got an i-mac as well but thats strictly for snow
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    (Original post by ANARCHY__)
    Didn't know if someone else had already posted this but OpenOffice, Rhythmbox and a lot of photo editing software is available to solve those problems respectively. Most OpenOffice document types open on Windows computers and Rhythmbox allows you delete and add music to your iPod (although .mp4 files sometimes cause problems I've found) and you can install Photoshop on Ubuntu and use it through Wine (which I highly recommend you get).

    Compared to 7, I've heard the system is really great but I'm personally used to comfortable, secure, rolling updates of Ubuntu. That said, I'm considering trying out Slackware but I've heard they've dropped GNOME. Could anybody tell me what they use instead (I'm not a fan of KDE or Xfce if those are the only alternatives)?
    http://gnomeslackbuild.org/ .
    I use GNOME on Slackware, everything works pretty well. XFCE is a good alternative though in my opinion. I like both really. I think if GNOME 3.0 becomes more 'bloated'(I know I'll get flamed but I like simplicity) then I'll be switching to XFCE.
    BTW, it's quite a long install. I think I have a distorted sense of time so this probably isn't accurate but I'm going to say it took be around an hour and a half for GNOME to install. Could be wrong though.
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by blueray)
    Im using windows 7 on my pc because its a gaming one,
    but on my laptop i use kubuntu purely because of its extremely good looks and functionality
    The last thing I'd use any Linux distribution for would be the GUI. Using just the GUI sorta defeats the point imo.
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by Emor)
    http://gnomeslackbuild.org/ .
    I use GNOME on Slackware, everything works pretty well. XFCE is a good alternative though in my opinion. I like both really. I think if GNOME 3.0 becomes more 'bloated'(I know I'll get flamed but I like simplicity) then I'll be switching to XFCE.
    BTW, it's quite a long install. I think I have a distorted sense of time so this probably isn't accurate but I'm going to say it took be around an hour and a half for GNOME to install. Could be wrong though.
    EMZ=]
    Thanks for this.

    I see what you mean about XFCE. My main problem is the interface which I know can be changed but seems like a pain to me when GNOME seems to be working fine right now under 10.04. Hour and a half is ok for me. Is there any kind of support forum in the same way there is for Ubuntu?
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    (Original post by Fallen)
    Linux is amazing.
    Anybody who thinks Linux is hard to use/unreliable/etc. should consider the following:

    1) Most Web and other servers (require total software reliability) run CentOS, RedHat, alternative Linux distro.

    2) Ever supercomputer I can think of runs Linux.

    3) A number of states (the specific example that comes to mind is Portugal) run Linux. All school computers in Portugal must run Linux. So a 5 year old schoolchild from Portugal can figure out Linux just fine, and you at home complain it doesn't work? Nice.

    4) Finally, most military organisations I have any knowledge about run their own distributions of Linux. Security, simplicity, reliability.
    Not to forget, that Microsoft Austria runs on Linux ;-)
 
 
 
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