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    I was successful at telephone, assessment day 1 (Bristol for Pareto) and assessment day 2 (Bournemouth for company) and have been highly skeptical throughout the process. They offer less at the final stage than when you apply for the job (23k, car, phone, laptop etc) down to call centre based on 20k basic which is far from a bad salary but not when your relocating to do so.

    If you go into it with your eyes open its good practice for other assessment days but expect less than what is offered if you are successful.
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    I don't think I have ever come across just a ridiculous conversation on a phone in my life. I sent my CV through their website last week, phone call Friday, said they'd be in touch next week.

    Phone went, I wasn't sure whether to answer it. I'm struggling with my sleeping pattern, but was just about up, so answer the phone. Also asked about salary at some point, I said I hadn't got a figure in mind, truthful.

    Asked what I want to do... bla bla.
    Asked about my University... I said which Uni very clearly. Did you say "xxx" (same city, better Uni!). To correct him I politely said "xx" and you could almost hear his face drop. Not perturbed, the convo continued.
    Asked what I studied at Uni: History and Politics.
    Asked what I got at Uni: 2:1.
    Asked what I enjoyed most at Uni: I liked to be constantly busy. Not lying, as I unless as I'm under pressure and busy, I don't enjoy anything!
    Asked what things I did outside Uni: I probably should have mentioned my old part time job but thought he meant hobbies, probably somewhat naive! "Well I commuted to University.(no harm/shame in that) I spent most of my time travelling across the UK watching sport." What I didn't get chance to say was anything else. I was being truthful, and the planning of the trips I did took a lot of time, there are many positives to it! Anyway, next thing he said "I'm sorry to say I have already spoken to far more capable candidates already this morning and I will be taking you off our database".

    That was it. I couldn't have been more stunned. Really did get the impression it was quite snobbish particularly with regards to my Uni. My hobbies have absolutely no bearing on what I do. In fact wherever I do travel, I learn about where I'm going, the planning is always interesting, unless I'm doing an away day watching my Rugby League side I don't even drink. Having been to places like Macedonia, Serbia in third year, it's an eye opener on the world. I travel and so I learn. Certainly a lot different to semi rural Derbyshire!

    There are means and ways of rejecting people, I'm not fussed but I think its definitely set my mind of doing recruitment over sales now. Anyway loads of people get a 2:1 at Uni. But everyone's different, hobbies, lifestyle choices etc, what Uni they chose to go to. I commuted, that was me. I worked hard even with a 5hr 30 round-trip each day and didn't just scrap a 2:1. The vibe of the conversation did not feel right from the moment I answered. I am not too bothered, and usually things are like water off a duck's back to me. It seemed quite personal. I don't know if its because sport is portrayed negativity as a hobby, 90% of the sport I watch is semi pro at best! Maybe that is what graduate recruitment agencies are about, steep learning curve if it is.
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    I went through the process in 2005, phone interview, assessment centre (finished 2nd), three job interviews which produced two job offers.

    On the day, as it has already been alluded to here, your degree will mean nothing, they are looking for confidence, enthusiasm and something that sets you apart from the crowd.

    I left the job after 9 months or so but cannot fault the agency. However bear in mind that they are working on a commission basis, and will pressure you to take job offers.
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    I thought I'd update this threat with MY experiences with Pareto Law.

    I applied for several jobs through Reed.co.uk, a lot of which were through Pareto. The first thing to keep in mind is that when you apply for a job with Pareto, you're not actually applying for that job - they're just trying to attract as many CV's as possible because they work in volume. I have done work a lot (I worked for a few years before uni) through recruitment agencies and Pareto's entire system is somewhat suspect. Whenever I have, in the past, applied for a job with a new recruitment agency I have simply had to have a small interview with them before they've put me through for an interview at the actual place; sometimes I have not even had to have an interview at the firm because I have had the skills and/or experience.

    After my telephone interview, I found this thread. I became a little disheartened but assumed most negative comments were because people had not received jobs and were angry or bitter. No offence to anyone who is 21 and just left uni, but I'm guessing a lot of you haven't faced a lot of rejection from jobs etc so I assumed most comments were coming from a place of angst. I decided I was still going to go, but moved my assessment day to a week later so that it would be after every other interview (keeping it as sort of a back up plan).

    I didn't end up going in the end, as on Monday I attended another assessment day and was offered a job there. Three year grad scheme, decent salary, professional qualifications paid for by the company. Having dug a lot up surrounding the company, how they (and other recruitment agencies operate) I'd like to put some things into perspective for people who may be a bit more naive.


    1) The jobs you are applying for, and that Pareto advertises are not the jobs they will end up putting you forward for. There IS a chance they will just try to hire you directly into recruitment/admin, or that you will be in commission only/cold calling roles. There may be some great jobs that they have going but the likelihood of it is slim. Big companies can afford their own graduate schemes and have their own big HR departments to handle them. It's the customer service style jobs they will outsource, so keep that in mind.

    2) The people trying to get you to go to the assessment days are paid on commission for not only getting you to go to the assessment day, but also extra if you are successful. Pareto are then paid when you find a job, as it is cheaper to do it that way. Don't believe the people you have phone interviews with if they tell you that they reject 80% of applications; they're pretty much only going to reject people who perhaps come off as a bit inept on the phone.

    3) The assessment days are PURE VOLUME RECRUITING. I was told there were already 40 people attending my assessment day with the likelihood being more. In contrast, the recruitment day I attended where I actually got a job had SIX people, and the one before that has EIGHT. They do three assessment days over the country every week, so probably see up to 150 fresh-faced people a week.

    4) Even if you DID land a job with a company car, you would be TAXED on it's use. Nothing is free, and a 21k salary with a high value company car would quickly work out a lot less.

    5) To Pareto's credit, assessment days aren't to assess your capability of doing a job. It's a graduate job so they will assume you know how to handle your time and learn new things. People complaining that the assessment day tasks "weren't relevant" need to realise that personality counts about as much as your education, if not more. The assessment days are to ween out the shy, non-team players who may have gotten great degrees. However, 7 hours for an assessment day takes the piss. My other ones were about 5 hours with half an hour lunch in there.


    What I took away from this is that their recruitment staff are very capable sales people, and that is probably where the majority of people who are successful in their recruitment days end up. The guy I was in contact with would ring me every few days to make sure I was still going, and once even rang me on a Saturday from his mobile, and when I asked him if he had gotten an email admitted he wasn't even at work that day. These people are desperate, as their income relies on you going to this sardine-can assessment day.

    Pareto might be great for those of you who want to get in to sales, or who can't find anything else - but I made it clear I wasn't really in to sales and the guy still was pushing for me to go.

    Another thing that bugged me is that the guy trying to get me to go was supposed to call me Tuesday, but never did. He also once told me he'd call me back in 10 minutes but then rang back a day later. Quite unprofessional.


    TL;DR - In closing, I didn't attend Pareto's assessment day because I got another job offer, but their persistence (calling me twice/three times a week) and unprofessional approach (not calling me when they said they would) left me feeling uneasy about the company; however, take all the negative comments lightly as most people posting have probably never faced something like this and been rejected. They are young graduates who think that having a degree makes them the dogs nuts, and aren't used to rejection. This is the real world, where not every effort is met with some sort of reward.

    Just because Pareto say they work with big companies doesn't mean they're regulated by them or even offer decent jobs. I once applied for a job that involved "sales" with a company that had "close ties with TalkTalk". The job? Door-to-door selling TalkTalk subscriptions on a commission only basis (I declined)

    One last thing, though. Pareto was one of three assessment days I was invited to. Pareto was also the ONLY one not to ask if I had any dietary requirements for lunch. Bit suspect; did they plan on feeding me or not?
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    I received a call from this company today. The caller claimed I had applied for a business-to-business sales role, which immediately struck me as strange, as I'm not the kind of person who goes for sales jobs. I assumed there had been some mistake on my part, especially when the caller said I applied for the job on reed.co.uk, which is a job site I regularly use, as it is for many others. He asked what degree I had and what result I received and what attracted me to a sales role. I said there must have been a mix-up on my part - I thought I had applied for a sales role accidentally. But after finishing the call, I logged into my reed.co.uk account and found I had applied for no such job, despite him claiming I had applied 'recently' when I questioned this. Very strange.
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    (Original post by Mr Wind-Up Bird)
    I received a call from this company today. The caller claimed I had applied for a business-to-business sales role, which immediately struck me as strange, as I'm not the kind of person who goes for sales jobs. I assumed there had been some mistake on my part, especially when the caller said I applied for the job on reed.co.uk, which is a job site I regularly use, as it is for many others. He asked what degree I had and what result I received and what attracted me to a sales role. I said there must have been a mix-up on my part - I thought I had applied for a sales role accidentally. But after finishing the call, I logged into my reed.co.uk account and found I had applied for no such job, despite him claiming I had applied 'recently' when I questioned this. Very strange.
    If you have uploaded your CV to Reed, recruiters who have paid for access can read your CV and can contact you for roles. I suspect this was speculative call, hidden behind the excuse/lie that you had applied.


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    Hi everyone,
    Can anybody help me out with the phone interview as most of the reviews are about the assessment day. Can i get more details about the phone interview and list any questions you can remember.
    Thank you.
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    Hi there,
    Can you share some details about pre-screening and the phone interview please.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Rajivm)
    Hi there,
    Can you share some details about pre-screening and the phone interview please.
    Thanks
    If you wanna pass the phone interview, just sound competitive, money hungry and persistent. Also know that a lot of the time you're simply going to be cold calling so when they ask you how you feel about that you should have an appropriate answer. Lastly, stop being so lazy and read through this thread, plenty of people mention the phone interview.
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    thanks your reply, i'll go through it.
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    There are clearly a lot of negative experiences with this company, but I'm going to leave you with my experience and you can take it as you will.

    Similarly to another individual on here I got a call from the Pareto company, and was confused as to why as I'd not applied for any roles through them. We had a quick chat and they described what their company does, and I progressed through to the phone interview that involved some competence based questions that seemed to gauge my attitude. I was then invited to the assessment day, I had an afternoon slot so didn't have to be there until 3pm, which gave me time to travel down.

    Prior to the assessment day I had the individual who conducted the phone interview regularly calling and emailing me to guide me on how to construct my 3 minute presentation and how to conduct myself when I get there - as you will of heard, they're very heavily focused on how you conduct yourself and how professional your appearance is. But I found this quite helpful, this was my first assessment day.

    The assessment day started with getting the 30 odd candidates (equal men and women) signed in and given a name badge, then we were taken to a larger room and given an introduction to Pareto and explained what the day would entail. From the word go there were Clients from anonymous companies sat watching (some who later offered interviews to candidates they were impressed by), and multiple Pareto staff taking notes - as there were quite a few of us.

    We were taken through some competency based exercises, designed to see how you acted under pressure, with other people and how well you could communicate. After this was a short break - *maybe too short, someone asked earlier if they should bring their own lunch..I would.

    Then after this was the Interview and Presentation stages. For this we were all sat in the room having a more informal chat with one of the Pareto colleagues, discussing CV advice, cover letter advice and examples of how to conduct yourself in an interview. While this was going on people were being called in and out to a private room to do either the interview of presentation. This section did seem quite unstructured but I can only imagine to get through the volume of people they had they needed something a little less formal so that the people outside the room didn't miss too much?

    Anyway, the Interview was short and sweet, just collecting some basic information about you and where you want to work, what area you're interested in and whether or not you'd relocate etc.
    The Presentation seemed more like your real chance to show your ability to impress, obviously you were marked during the exercises but this was your given chance to have the focus on you and display your ability to communicate, organise and perform. I actually thought I did terribly in mine to be honest, but it may of been the nerves.

    After this was all over we did one last exercise that we had been asked to prepare while waiting for all the interviews and presentations to be completed, which was more of a formality (the main decisions had clearly already been made) and then told the day was finished and were split up into different rooms. The one I was taken to was for the successful candidates, which was a surprise for me.

    Since then I've received a few calls a day consistently, offering opportunities from the three locations I chose as an interest during my interview. I am now currently going to interviews that I select to accept, and still have the regular support and advice from whichever member of Pareto staff which has set me up with the interview.


    Anyway, to finish this off - after reading through some of the other comments:
    Yes - bring lunch, it's a really long day and they don't offer much on the break.
    Be aware of what working in sales may be like before going - you may be overqualified to go and absolutely waste your time by doing so if it's not the career choice you want.
    None of the positions I have are commission based - I have no idea where this information has come from.
    Yes, it can come across to be very focused on looks..but again...sales.

    Feel free to leave me a comment, I'll be happy to answer any questions.
    ..although it's worth knowing I'm not looking for an argument, clearly there are many people who've had bad experiences, so do what they teach you at uni/college and make intellectual decisions after objectively considering your information - and know what you want for you!

    Thanks.
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    Hello,

    Like many of you, I have had terrible experienceS at assessment dayS (3 to be precise) hosted by these 'recruitment agencies'. They all mirror each other and have been lead by young individuals in their mid-late 20s. First you submit your C.V., you get the great news via email/telephone call that your C.V. was fantastic and that you've past the first stage. Then you have a telephone interview and more than likely, you'll be successful (perhaps so they can make up numbers for any given assessment day). Following your great success, you're invited to the assessment day. You see all these young recruiters smartly dressed with notebook and pen in hand as if diligently doing their jobs at 'judging' you. The first task is usually to say something about yourself (the exact details vary from company to company) whilst in front of everyone after which you're informally questioned a little. In all of my experiences, I believe that it is at this point they make their decisions or shortlist or do the main sift. After this point, we were put into groups to assess our team work. Given how loudly people spoke during these group tasks, these recruiters could hardly hear us to assess us. They just stand around pretending to be taking notes in my opinion. Following this, you are given a break during which they call people and told them of their failure or they call you in for 1-1 interviews. Again, during this interview, no attention, I repeat ABSOLUTELY NO ATTENTION was paid to the words coming out of my mouth. At this point you already know your fate. I honestly think that it gives you experience for interviews by building up your confidence if not familiarity speaking etc. However, I now never expect anything to come of it and I treat it as an opportunity to waste their time; they get nothing from me because they won't place me but I get an opportunity for exposure to similar situations. Anyway, afterwards you're usually emailed saying that your recruiter would provide you with feedback, don't expect it, it never happens. Oh, and one company; PARETO LAW, had various recruiters assisting graduates with great inconsistency. Very many graduates had their recruiters working hard with them getting their presentations in order, telling them EXACTLY what will happen on the day, practising their poems or whatever it be for the day. My recruiter did nothing of that sort. I only got ideas through the website (which did not contain all the info as other graduates had to hand) and through reviews such as those above. My advice to anyone having to go to an assessment centre is to treat it as an opportunity to practise your communication skills, to gain familiarity with interview situations and build overall confidence. Let's use these jerks' time to our own benefit! Why not!?

    The whole experience though left me wondering what the HR departments in companies using recruitment agencies do or what are they exactly trying to achieve. I've asked a few senior individuals of fairly huge and global companies and they all share a similar view; HR departments can outsource the bulk of their recruiting to recruitment agencies run my recent confident graduates who are paid less for the job.
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    Hi,

    I attended a Pareto Law undergraduate assessment day yesterday and I honestly couldn't tell you why they have ever experienced negative reviews. The whole day had a very friendly atmosphere and it was very well structured. The day left me knowing that sales is exactly what I want to go in to. The day, whether you are successful or not, is a fantastic experience. They spoke about how to perfectly structure a CV and cover letter and offered many practical solutions to awkward interview situations.

    A fantastic day and a fantastic group of people, do not pay attention to the negative reviews-go and experience it for yourself!
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    I'm a final year student who was panic-applying for graduate jobs and was actually quite dubious when I got the call back from Pareto...but actually I thought the recruitment process was really good - I didn’t feel like I was in a pressurised situation because of the friendliness of my graduate manager on the phone, and so I could demonstrate my strongest attributes in the best light, and I felt confident doing so. I was a little bit nervous when the telephone interview was sprung on me during a general follow-up call, but I thought it was handled well so I was able to display confidence even in an unprecedented situation. I was very happy with the feedback and help I was given when preparing for my 3 minute presentation for the assessment centre; it was extremely helpful, and helped me to focus my points on the question and that enabled me to keep within the time limit. The assessment centre in London was a good day - I was nervous but also prepared for a challenge, and the day was a lot friendlier than I had envisaged. The staff and the (under)graduates were all lovely, and, although the day presented me with many challenges, I was also able to have fun and chat with the people around me, which was great. I actually thought on the day that if I end up working with people as friendly as this, I’ll be really happy. The whole recruitment experience changed my perception of what sales is, and I’m very excited to start my career in sales in September 2015.
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    I was skeptical about Pareto right from the start but having just completed the entire process from assessment day to successful company interview to training week at their center in Wilmslow I would recommend the agency to anyone serious about a career in sales.
    It is probably worth pointing out that I think getting a large number of hopeful graduates down to their assessment day is morally wrong when most are there under false pretenses. You should only think about attending if you really understand what sales involves and want a job in a target driven high pressured environment.
    Pareto, like every recruitment agency, is only interested in the commission they make from placing graduates. Having said that they make this money from working with some fantastic companies which offers those that get on their books some incredible opportunities.
    They have also invested to offer those that are placed great training on a very enjoyable away week, probably because they want the blue chip companies that work with them to keep using them for new graduates.
    I guess my point is this I don't think Pareto is a great company, and from the reviews online their grueling assessment day and harsh rejection at the end has clearly upset a lot of people that weren't prepared. However, if you want a GOOD sales job (and there are a lot of rubbish sales jobs out there) where the rewards are high then Pareto certainly has opportunities that are worth taking them up on!
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    Weirdly I just came across this page as well and thought I'd add my two cents. I went through the Pareto process 2 years ago and then went back to find my replacement a year later at the assessment day. The two days I experienced were identical and clearly there are a lot of people in the room who were never made for a career is sales. However, I think that it is the point of Pareto to separate those that actually want and can do effective sales/account management from those that would be much better elsewhere. My only criticism is that they clearly have graduate resourcers who will put anyone in the assessment process just to fill numbers and that seems both harsh and pointless. The whole day would probably be better if less people were involved and more were filtered out through the phone interview
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    I have just joined this forum to give my opinion on Pareto after I first read this a few months ago and I almost ended up not going to the assessment day because I felt quite disheartened! I am thankful I did! I now work for a great company selling a really great product after being placed (not outsourced) by Pareto. You can check my linked in if you don't believe me Gaynor Lomas-Clements. If anyone wants to message me you can reach me on there as I probably wont be back on here much.

    I left Uni with a first in Hospitality Business management from Leeds Met, I had no idea what I wanted to do so as all graduates do hammered jobsites sending my CV all over. Pareto called and said I had applied for a sales job and explained who they were. I definately had not applied for a sales job as I was not interested in commission jobs and did not think a career in sales was for me.

    The first phone call was the lady on the phone telling me about Pareto, how they take on the top 20% of graduates, asking me about my degree, my interests, what drives me etc. I passed the phone interview and was invited to an assessment day.

    The assessment day was like others I had been to, it was expected of everyone to dress smart yet some people looked scruffy!!!! We had to do an introductory task, they want to know what you know about Pareto so do your research, they then ask everyone to briefly introduce themselves. The groups are then seperated to do the group tasks.

    In the group tasks be yourself, be confident and make sure you get your point across. The winning is not necessarily important it is how you present yourself with others. I am naturally a strong personality and have been throughout my work and education so I enjoyed the group tasks!

    There is then the section where half the group is required to go and give a presentation you have prepared and others have an interview. Again it is all about how you present yourself, be confident and believe in what you are presenting.

    I was one of the 6 out of the 30 who were successful so I don't know what happened to the other room. One of the other successful candidates asked who scored the highest and it was me which I was obviously happy about! I didn't think a career in sales was for me but I have since found out it is perfect for me!

    The whole day took about 6 hours, it was tiring, it was quite stressful even though I had done assessment days before but that is because you are being judged from the minute you walk in to the minute you leave. All the assessors I found to be friendly and helpful but of course they were professional which some people may interpret as unfriendly.

    After being successful I received a few calls, the recruiters were trying to convince me to relocate but I have 2 children so it was a no go. I attended an interview that was in an office too far away. I enjoyed the experience of going and chatting to the sales manager there, it was a good job 20k basic but OTE of at least 35k in the first year but I would have to do a 3 hour trip every day. The second interview I offered was the job I am in now. It is a field sales job based at home but travelling around the North East of England to different schools. Before my interviews the recruiter called me and checked I was prepared and happy, she gave me advice and basically encouraged me by being positive and reminding me what I did well in the assessment day and phone interview. I really believed in the product and really wanted the job!! I was successful and started a few weeks ago. £22500 basic with OTE in the first year £30k, fully expensed company car which is a 14 Plate Ford focus, a Macbook Air, A brand new Motorola 4G phone and an Ipad. Tomorrow I am going on an expensed company trip to London for the night for training and to meet my colleagues who are also based at their own homes in their own areas!! The whole process from that first phone call to starting my new job took 6 weeks, but 2 weeks of that was christmas. Pareto really did help me get a fantastic job and as a recruiter I can't fault them.

    Like I said if anyone wants to ask me any questions contact me via linked in
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    Hi, I have an assessment tomorrow.

    I have read all your reviews and seeing as they are quite mixed decided to go.

    I was just wondering how long they last and if they go over?
    It says it is supposed to end at 4 and I will travelling a long way and cannot afford to miss my last train back to the village (At 7)
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    Hey on my way back from the Leeds assessment and bored on the train so I thought I would write about it.

    Firstly I didn't get in. I'm not sore about it or anything. Tbh I don't know what they saw in the people that got it so it obviously wasn't for me.

    Secondly they have new tests now and mix it up a lot. Noone was shouty or aggressive. They liked people who designated and took turns more.

    It's all about how you behave when you listen as well as how you talk. There's a guy with a clipboard putting an 'x' next to your name if you fidget or talk to fast or are goofy.

    Deff dress smart.

    Everyone there is nice too. Obviously assertive as they are in sales but not aggressive like it says here.

    If you go not expecting to get in and just learn a lot and get feedback and meet people in the same situation as you. Then you will enjoy it. If you go thinking you deserve it or something you will leave pissed off.

    Also... it will run over. Mine did by 2 hours so be careful booking tickets

    That's my experience anyways.

    Also if you get an interview, email competitors saying you are in their one and they will give you interviews too. That worked with me so I'm off to another next week.
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    Hi.

    I have been through the Pareto process and there are some positives and negatives.

    Firstly, they are a genuine company!

    I was firstly offered a telephone interview. As I work full time, getting the time was difficult to do this but they were really accommodating and they did this out of office hours.

    Being honest, after being contacted and having my telephone interview, by them for the assessment day, I was bombarded with calls about doing preparation for the sessions. I found this a bit annoying and just wanted to get on with it! However, the email stuff they send you is really informative so, swings and roundabouts!

    The assessment day is long but overall, engaging. I think there are a lot of negative things about it from the people who weren't successfull which is understandable.

    Firstly, we had to stand up, give our name and our greatest achievement. This may sound a little cheesy but the whole day is scored so even the usual ice breakers are being assessed.

    You are then taken for 2 group tasks, and informal 1 to 1 and to do a small presentation. All of these tasks were fine and actually, just a bit of fun.

    My advice would be, to take the day for what it is. It's a big game and the tasks are not the real point. It's how you conduct yourself throughout the day, even when you are just sat listening.

    The day is long and you are tired afterwards but, you find out on the day if you are successfull.

    My day was on Wednesday, after finding out I was successful, I was offered 2 interviews on the day and a further one the day after to be interviewed on the Friday! They do move quickly if that is what you truly want!

    All of the lads who offered me the interviews were REALLY helpful. One guy even went through all my stuff with me at 8.30pm because he knew that I had a lot of work to do to prepare for 3 interviews the following day. This part of their support was much more valuable than the first part which was preparing for the assessment day.

    Today, is the day of my 3 interviews, hopefully I will be successful in at least one! Thanks to Lawrence, Chris and Ben, I feel well prepared and ready to go.

    Thanks guys x
 
 
 
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