When does one become 'old'? Watch

aspirinpharmacist
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#101
Report 6 years ago
#101
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
When you enjoy them because they're not yours...
When you enjoy them because it's yours, then you know you're very old indeed.
0
quote
reply
FunkeyMunkey
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#102
Report 6 years ago
#102
35 is old
0
quote
reply
philistine
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#103
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#103
(Original post by the bear)
you are as old as the person you feel
But, but... you're a bear. You cannot feel without mauling. But, many men maul with feeling, do they not? I dunno' man.

(Original post by Entangled)
One is only as old as the woman one feels.
Another famous epigram. Coleridge, was it?

A man is as old as he feels. A woman, as old as she looks.
A man's face is his autobiography; a woman's face is her work of fiction.
Just to continue the trend...

(Original post by strawberry)
Well, they say three things happen when you get old.
First, you start to lose your memory.
Second, uh...
Delightful.

(Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
I guess so. When you start to enjoy reading obituaries, then you're old.
You're familiar with the eponymous Clarence Darrow.
0
quote
reply
miss_martha_jane
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#104
Report 6 years ago
#104
when one's tits are in one's shoes.
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#105
Report 6 years ago
#105
(Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
When you enjoy them because it's yours, then you know you're very old indeed.
And communicating via a medium.
0
quote
reply
aspirinpharmacist
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#106
Report 6 years ago
#106
(Original post by philistine)
You're familiar with the eponymous Clarence Darrow.
Actually no. I read it somewhere else, I forget where.
0
quote
reply
aspirinpharmacist
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#107
Report 6 years ago
#107
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
And communicating via a medium.
Not just communicating, but drinking tea with them and asking them for the thousandth time if they would like sugar in it, because you forgot their answer every other time you asked.
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#108
Report 6 years ago
#108
(Original post by philistine)

You're familiar with the eponymous Clarence Darrow.
In what is he eponymous?
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#109
Report 6 years ago
#109
(Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
Not just communicating, but drinking tea with them and asking them for the thousandth time if they would like sugar in it, because you forgot their answer every other time you asked.
And asking them to repeat their answer because you can't hear it.
0
quote
reply
Entangled
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#110
Report 6 years ago
#110
(Original post by philistine)
Another famous epigram. Coleridge, was it?
Difficult to pin down exactly as the authorship has passed through the (probably) muddied waters of time. I believe it was probably a Groucho Marx remark (remarx?) but it could have been taken from the writers of old - maybe Coleridge, maybe someone like Fields.
0
quote
reply
philistine
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#111
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#111
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
In what is he eponymous?
The law was very much a dry profession, at least in terms of blatant flamboyance before Darrow. I don't agree with the claims that he was essentially transplanting a diluted Wilde personality onto himself, though some seem to see it that way


(Original post by Entangled)
Difficult to pin down exactly as the authorship has passed through the (probably) muddied waters of time. I believe it was probably a Groucho Marx remark (remarx?) but it could have been taken from the writers of old - maybe Coleridge, maybe someone like Fields.
I'm quite the Coleridge admirer, as am I also of Groucho, Byron and Wordsworth. I've seen a fair few quotes which seem to have been changed ever so slightly amongst twentieth century figures, almost claiming them as their own. It only seems natural though, really.
Last edited by philistine; 6 years ago
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#112
Report 6 years ago
#112
(Original post by philistine)
The law was very much a dry profession, at least in terms of blatant flamboyance before Darrow. I don't agree with the claims that he was essentially transplanting a diluted Wilde personality onto himself, though some seem to see it that way
Eponymous means the character named in the title of a work, like David Copperfield. In what work is Clarence Darrow eponymous? I'm very familiar with notable law practitioners, but I don't know of any such text.
0
quote
reply
aspirinpharmacist
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#113
Report 6 years ago
#113
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
And asking them to repeat their answer because you can't hear it.
Because your hearing aid is in the fridge. But it doesn't matter because you can't talk properly anyway, because your dentures are under the sofa. You were afraid people would steal them.
0
quote
reply
philistine
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#114
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#114
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
Eponymous means the character named in the title of a work, like David Copperfield. In what work is Clarence Darrow eponymous? I'm very familiar with notable law practitioners, but I don't know of any such text.
Eponymous: being or relating to or bearing the name of an eponym.
Eponym: A person after whom a discovery, invention, place, etc., is named.
A name or noun formed in such a way.
From a biographical excerpt of Darrow:

Called a "sophisticated country lawyer", he remains notable for his wit and agnosticism, which marked him as one of the most famous American lawyers and civil libertarians.
It could easily be said that Darrow was eponymous, at least of which in artificing the howdy-doody, witty, funny, piss-taking Yankee lawyer. Aren't you an English teacher?
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#115
Report 6 years ago
#115
(Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
Because your hearing aid is in the fridge. But it doesn't matter because you can't talk properly anyway, because your dentures are under the sofa. You were afraid people would steal them.
Although if someone did, it wouldn't be a big deal as you live on a diet of Werther's Originals and Horlicks.
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#116
Report 6 years ago
#116
(Original post by philistine)
From a biographical excerpt of Darrow:



It could easily be said that Darrow was eponymous, at least of which in artificing the howdy-doody, witty, funny, piss-taking Yankee lawyer. Aren't you an English teacher?
Yes, I am. In what way is Clarence Darrow an eponym? He may be called a sophisticated country lawyer, but are sophisticated country lawyers called Clarence Darrows?
0
quote
reply
philistine
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#117
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#117
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
Yes, I am. In what way is Clarence Darrow an eponym? He may be called a sophisticated country lawyer, but are sophisticated country lawyers called Clarence Darrows?
Butchery, with a degree of tunnel vision in the definition of 'eponym'.

How many other American country lawyers are there; ones who personify, at least to the point of their very fibre being remembered for which, embody numerous witticisms, humble eccentricities and flagrant agnosticism?

Not many.
0
quote
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#118
Report 6 years ago
#118
(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
Yes, I am. In what way is Clarence Darrow an eponym? He may be called a sophisticated country lawyer, but are sophisticated country lawyers called Clarence Darrows?


the other poster probably mistook eponymous for some other adjective... maybe ubiquitous or egregious ...or androgynous
Last edited by the bear; 6 years ago
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#119
Report 6 years ago
#119
(Original post by philistine)
Butchery, with a degree of tunnel vision in the definition of 'eponym'.

How many other American country lawyers are there; ones who personify, at least to the point of their very fibre being remembered for which, embody numerous witticisms, humble eccentricities and flagrant agnosticism?

Not many.
Certainly not many. He was a great man, with a remarkable talent and considerable brass neck. But not eponymous.
eponymous (ɪˈpɒnɪməs) adj 1. (of a person) being the person after whom a literary work, film, etc, is named: the eponymous heroine in the film of Jane Eyre 2. (of a literary work, film, etc) named after its central character or creator: the Stooges' eponymous debut album
0
quote
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#120
Report 6 years ago
#120
(Original post by the bear)
the other poster probably mistook eponymous for some other adjective... maybe ubiquitous or egregious
Hi, Bear. Yes, I think so too. Darrow had his moments of egregiousness, but fewer moments of ubiquity, I suspect.
0
quote
reply
X

Reply to thread

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Who is most responsible for your success at university

Mostly me (429)
91.47%
Mostly my university including my lecturers/tutors (40)
8.53%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise