Science graduates 'lack skills needed by business' Watch

laura1234
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#101
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#101
Isn't this the exact reason why degree's with compulsory work placements and industry experience are becoming more popular than degree's that are just 100% academic with no real job route afterwards? I'm not saying that academic degree's are easy, far from it! But when they don't leave a real career path afterwards it makes things more of a struggle. I'm sure an employer would rather employ an engineering graduate for example who has been on 5 or 6 work placements as part of their course, gained industry experience, has managed to gain contacts and has a bulked out CV rather than an engineering graduate with no industry experience or contacts.
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thunder_chunky
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#102
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I find this pretty interesting. I work for an educational charity that tries to promote careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths) in kids. Starting from 11 and 12 year olds and working up to graduates. It's been an uphill struggle for good while.

I think it's just a question of setting off a spark in them. Showing them how things are constructed and how engineering works, and how science and maths are involved more often than not in day to day life. That's what my company tries to do however in an event of say 40 kids ten maybe a dozen at most will be interested with only a handful of those walking away determind to follow a career in STEM.

Some just don't want to know.
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Observatory
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(Original post by thunder_chunky)
I find this pretty interesting. I work for an educational charity that tries to promote careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths) in kids.
Out of interest, who is funding that? The government, employers, or just some rich guy who thinks engineering is cool?
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thunder_chunky
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(Original post by Observatory)
Out of interest, who is funding that? The government, employers, or just some rich guy who thinks engineering is cool?
Not the government, private funding comes from schools, colleges, universities and companies (mostly STEM related) who fund our events.
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im so academic
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(Original post by Astronomical)
This is because you have "science courses" that require say, CCD to get on to. :rolleyes:

Scrap those doss courses, and give more funding to the worthwhile institutes to improve their science intake. Problem solved.
This. The solution is so simple.

I don't care if the Chemistry course at London Met is accredited. We don't need it; other universities deserve that extra funding.
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babyjustin
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#106
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(Original post by BO'H)
science graduates are manifestly NOT an essential part of the economy despite what the STEM tedes tell you. how much 'scientific research' delivers the potential for profit in the short or medium term? not very much.
How much 'scientific research' determines the quality of life and how the human race will progress and solve the problems of the 21st century. Business people on the other hand are a leach on the economy.
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Observatory
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(Original post by im so academic)
This. The solution is so simple.

I don't care if the Chemistry course at London Met is accredited. We don't need it; other universities deserve that extra funding.
Most people on this thread have been talking about the jobs that are open to the top graduates who choose to stay in science.
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im so academic
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(Original post by Observatory)
Most people on this thread have been talking about the jobs that are open to the top graduates who choose to stay in science.
Just because you're a science graduate, it doesn't necessarily mean you're "top".
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Observatory
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(Original post by im so academic)
Just because you're a science graduate, it doesn't necessarily mean you're "top".
That's not what I meant (or what I said?).

What I mean is that people are saying there aren't great prospects even for the top science graduates, not just an average science graduate who is pulled down by London Met's chemistry department or whatever.
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Stir fried Giblets
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(Original post by babyjustin)
But aren't they forced into business because of the extremely low salaries offered - around £20000 - because of myopia by research institutions like GSK. Why shouldn't they be in business anyway. The most successful biotechnology companies where started by a couple of graduates with a brilliant idea for a new drug or scaling up drug production so I don't see what the point your making there is.
(Original post by Politricks)
With significant help from the government.
Sorry, I just caught these comments when searching TSR. £30,000 is definitely not a low wage, especially if you have good money sense. My family are living on about £17,000 a year and we are doing so comfortably. This is because my parents never buy something they can't afford. They're doing so well that they are a couple of years away from paying off their mortgage too. We don't get anything extra from the government either although my mam doesn't work (housewife). There are six of us living in the house plus a dog and we have ONE car. Soo..
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ufo2012
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(Original post by babyjustin)
You are one ignorant mother F***er aren't you!

Are you joking? STEM grads are an ESSENTIAL part of the economy. Scientific research has brought us to the stage we are today - your computer was designed and built by STEM grads - the bullets people shoot are designed by STEM grads - the TV you watch is built by STEM grads and the drugs you take are by STEM grads.

DOUCHEBAG!

oh by the way over 5 million jobs in the UK are directly employed in the science sector..
:lolz: I must say I completely LMAO'd at these.

Hilarious!


(Original post by babyjustin)
30000 is a good salary particularly for a graduate but what I meant was that scientists can't surpass it at the height of their career whereas lorry drivers are earning 40000+ and even threatened to go on strike.

What graduates should do is if they find companies are offering them less or not as good progression as a non-graduate, boycott those companies - stick the proverbial middle finger up at them.

If that means leaving the country to get better paid roles where they will be more appreciated, then so be it.

Businesses and the government will soon learn they need to support their scientists and pay them proper money and give them proper progression.
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Psyk
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(Original post by Stir fried Giblets)
Sorry, I just caught these comments when searching TSR. £30,000 is definitely not a low wage, especially if you have good money sense. My family are living on about £17,000 a year and we are doing so comfortably. This is because my parents never buy something they can't afford. They're doing so well that they are a couple of years away from paying off their mortgage too. We don't get anything extra from the government either although my mam doesn't work (housewife). There are six of us living in the house plus a dog and we have ONE car. Soo..
It blows my mind that you could support a family of 6 on only £17,000.
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Llamageddon
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(Original post by Observatory)
2. For those middle management, sales, etc. roles university skills are irrelevant. University ensures you have the right social background and are decently intelligent and hard working, but mostly it is down to your personality and work experience. So it doesn't stand to reason that if you can't do it as a science graduate that you would have had any more luck with a different degree.
In medical/ pharmaceutical and general science sales though you frequently need to have not just studied a related subject but to have worked in a related field also. These are very technical sales though and obviously doesn't apply when you're selling cheese to asda.
4. It doesn't surprise me that most biologists don't learn maths, because biology is not a particularly mathematical subject. The only course I can think they would need from the A level is stats, which is surely better taught in the first year at university than bundled with a lot of irrelevant calculus.
Surprisingly it is. You're right though, it is for the most part just ~A'level stats. If people go into Biology who are genuinely not very good at maths though then they'll find research very difficult indeed.
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Llamageddon
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(Original post by Stir fried Giblets)
Sorry, I just caught these comments when searching TSR. £30,000 is definitely not a low wage, especially if you have good money sense.
Just an FYI I read your name as Sir Fred Giblets.

Was wondering who Fred Giblets was and what he was knighted for.
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Stir fried Giblets
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(Original post by Psyk)
It blows my mind that you could support a family of 6 on only £17,000.
I don't know exactly how my parents manage it but they must make a lot of sacrifices (don't go out a lot for leisure activities although they do drink and my mam still smokes). But thanks When it's my birthday I never know what to ask for because I have everything I want already. I just think it's because we live in a very materialistic society atm.

(Original post by Llamageddon)
Just an FYI I read your name as Sir Fred Giblets.

Was wondering who Fred Giblets was and what he was knighted for.
Lmao this made my day :P
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