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    (Original post by nikk)
    lol, that is funny!!!

    Seriously though, in my opinion getting a 3rd is pretty much a failure. A 2ii might be satisfactory for a few people that really struggle with academia, but the majority of people should really be aiming for a 2i, with a small proportion of them hitting a first.

    Sounds harsh but then so is the real world. With so many people having a 2i, anything below that is definitely very sub-standard!
    I love selective quoting!

    sat·is·fac·to·ry Audio pronunciation of "Satisfactory" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (sts-fkt-r)
    adj.

    Giving satisfaction sufficient to meet a demand or requirement; adequate.
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    (Original post by Casey)
    It depends on what you can achieve, if you can get a first but get a 2ii then that is a really poor degree, if on the other hand you scrape a 2ii after putting your heart and soul into it and trying your best then that is exceptional.

    And nikk is right in saying that most graduate employers won't even look at people with anything less than a 2i .
    Define a 'graduate employer'. I know of many public sector workers with 2:2s. Many PGCE courses accept graduates with 2:2s. Certain graduate employers 'won't even look at people with anything less than a 2i' but then Certain graduate employers won't even look at graduates from unis other than Oxbridge and certain UoL colleges.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    I love selective quoting!

    sat·is·fac·to·ry Audio pronunciation of "Satisfactory" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (sts-fkt-r)
    adj.

    Giving satisfaction sufficient to meet a demand or requirement; adequate.
    What is your point? I still think most people would agree that they wouldn't call a 2ii a 'good' degree, and nor would they say that a 3rd was satisfactory. Would you be satisfied with a third?
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    (Original post by nikk)
    I still think most people would agree that they wouldn't call a 2ii a 'good' degree, and nor would they say that a 3rd was satisfactory. Would you be satisfied with a third?
    Personally, I'd die of shame if I got a third - and pretty damn upset if I got a 2:2.
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    [QUOTE=BellaCat]Define a 'graduate employer'. I know of many public sector workers with 2:2s. Many PGCE courses accept graduates with 2:2s. [QUOTE]

    Nuff said.


    I think the point is that the OP can't be arsed to knuckle down and do some work...if someone is self confessed capable of getting a 2.1 or a 1st and chooses not to, they're just lazy and immature. Especially if citing beer as one of the reasons for the decision!

    Not bothered about money? That's ok to say when someone is bankrolling your lifestyle. Give it 5 years...

    Discovering oneself? I can think of better ways of doing that than spending £15k+3years on a crap degree!
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Definately for research postgraduates and some taught courses - however there are masters degree programmes at Oxford that you can get on with a 2:2 (generally more vocational or discipline hopping ones), I did read the graduate studies prospectuses before posting my last post btw. It highlights the big problem with master's degrees really. There are those that are further study beyond degree level (either by taught or research) and then there are those that are "vocational" or "retraining" for graduates and these are generally of a lower standard and are a good earner for universities, which is why they all have them. Nottingham is particularly bad I think for this.
    Can you give me any links? I'd be quite suprised to find any course at Oxford where there are more than the rare 2ii holder.
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    (Original post by nikk)
    What is your point? I still think most people would agree that they wouldn't call a 2ii a 'good' degree, and nor would they say that a 3rd was satisfactory. Would you be satisfied with a third?
    Would I have been satisfied with a third?* Personally, no but then I'm not as charming, sociable or sporty as my brother.

    If a candidate doesn't perform satisfactorily (in the eyes of whatever institution he/she is attending) then he/she would be awarded an Ordinary degree. (Or no degree at all). That's a given, isn't it? Or it should be. But then maybe we have the same problem with grade inflation at degree level as we appear to have at A'level.

    I believe Fluffy is a graduate medic and has said that there are a number of people with 2:2s on her course.

    EDIT: For the record, I did not get a 2:2 either.

    *And if I had been in the position of a very good friend of mine who was diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder halfway through his degree and was so heavily medicated he could barely manage to get up in the morning (Freaking doctors!) I would have been very proud to have achieved what he did - yes, you guessed - a third.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)

    I believe Fluffy is a graduate medic and has said that there are a number of people with 2:2s on her course.
    There are, but not with 'only' a 2ii. Of the three I know well, one has AAAA at A-Level, one has a 2ii from Cambridge (so I am assuming AAA type A-Levels), and the other has a distinction level masters as well as 5 years of working overseas on an aid project.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    There are, but not with 'only' a 2ii. Of the three I know well, one has AAAA at A-Level, one has a 2ii from Cambridge (so I am assuming AAA type A-Levels), and the other has a distinction level masters as well as 5 years of working overseas on an aid project.
    Well, if you're doing graduate medicine I'd imagine you have 'life experience' to offer as well. Again, a given, I'd hope.

    EDIT: As well as a capacity for empathy and compassion but, judging by some medics/doctors I've encountered - apparently not.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    Well, if you're doing graduate medicine I'd imagine you have 'life experience' to offer as well. Again, a given, I'd hope.
    You miss my point - they didn't get in with a 2ii, they got in with excellent A-Levels. I mentioned the massess of w/e for my one friend, as BL don't usually take a masters to 'boost' a 2ii... i.e they are exceptions, not the rule...
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    You miss my point - they didn't get in with a 2ii, they got in with excellent A-Levels. I mentioned the massess of w/e for my one friend, as BL don't usually take a masters to 'boost' a 2ii... i.e they are exceptions, not the rule...
    No, I didn't miss your point. I got that. Thanks. No need to be quite so supercilious.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    No, I didn't miss your point. I got that. Thanks. No need to be quite so supercilious.
    Then what was your point about saying that we take 2iis?

    And don't call me arrogant, that's a very superior and anal view point to take, and one that I find disdainful.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Then what was your point about saying that we take 2iis?

    And don't call me arrogant, that's a very superior and anal view point to take, and one that I find disdainful.
    Who's 'we'?

    I was referring to a thread you participated in a while back in which you mentioned that you had a few peeps with 2iis on your course. Thank you for elaborating.

    And I was referring to your tone, not to your character.
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    We as in Barts and The London.

    And what's wrong with being straight to the point - 'plain English' and all that. You can dress it up all you want, but a wolf in sheeps clothing is still a wolf...
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    We as in Barts and The London.

    And what's wrong with being straight to the point - 'plain English' and all that. You can dress it up all you want, but a wolf in sheeps clothing is still a wolf...
    Okay. Apologies if I've inadvertently offended your institution. For all I know they really could have taken on a few successful Jude the Obscures...or Judith the Obscures.

    But it seems that Hardy got it right.
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    Jobs at HSBC:
    Management Trainee Programme – 2:2 degree, 14 UCAS points.
    Information Technology: 2.2 (Hons) degree, 12 UCAS points.

    Jobs at ASDA
    20 UCAS points for all schemes.
    2:2 degree for Retail Management & Logistics.
    Benefits:
    £21,000 p.a. starting salary
    24 days' annual holiday
    Healthcare
    Discretionary bonus scheme
    Christmas shopping vouchers and parties
    Regular pay reviews

    Not extremely glamourous, but they are big corporations whose name will be recognized by anyone on your CV when you try to move upward and onward...
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    Surely this depends on the subject and university? I mean personally I'd say a 2ii in Law at Oxford is better than a first in armchair studies from Neverheardofshire, but maybe that's just me.
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    (Original post by ellewoods)
    One thing that I hope people are not perceiving from this thread is that it is impossible to pretty much "have it all" during uni.

    I am on line for a 1:1, and I'm final year law, so my degree is really quite demanding... I worked 20 hours a week at my part time job during years 1 & 2, and still work around 15 hours a week now during my final year... I have a CV full of extra curricular stuff (I found short term volunteer projects etc great as they look good on your CV, and don't place long term commitment on your time) ... and also horse ride & care for the horses at least 3 times a week!! I have lots of friends, and socialise with them on top of all this

    I think rather than prioritising hockey during his finals, the OP should look at his time management and ensure he is studying effectively, and not wasting time.

    With motivation and organisation, there is no need for anyone to think they cannot achieve a great degree and socialise, do sporting activities etc
    I envy your time-management skills! I had so much extra-curricular stuff the term before christmas that I was forced to become better organised, unfortunately the organisational skills seem to have deserted me just in time for finals...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Jonatan)
    Surely this depends on the subject and university? I mean personally I'd say a 2ii in Law at Oxford is better than a first in armchair studies from Neverheardofshire, but maybe that's just me.
    I'd personally take the 2ii in that case too, but I know that there are people that wouldn't, or at least would say they wouldn't .
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    (Original post by Casey)
    as I hit a first in mocks and am aiming for one this Summer.
    I swear, you say this every other day at least.
 
 
 
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