yawn
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#101
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#101
(Original post by naivesincerity)
I don't. I'm just being a know it all..But lets be honest it hasn't got the population and the variety of England, or the cities.
I think that part of its charm comes from having a smaller population, the opportunity to retain its areas of outstanding beauty and peaceful existence from not losing great swathes to countryside to housing developments to accommodate more people; and the diversity in its cities, thanks for the EU enlargement and more Europeans going to settle in Ireland.

Though it does have fitter women. The people in England are a tad nicer I'd say.
The Irish has a much better sense of humour, the fellas are so handsome with lovely, romantic accents and overall the people are much more friendly and welcoming to visitors.

Although, I'm very nice 'cos I is English, innit?
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naivesincerity
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#102
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#102
(Original post by yawn)
I think that part of its charm comes from having a smaller population, the opportunity to retain its areas of outstanding beauty and peaceful existence from not losing great swathes to countryside to housing developments to accommodate more people; and the diversity in its cities, thanks for the EU enlargement and more Europeans going to settle in Ireland.



The Irish has a much better sense of humour, the fellas are so handsome with lovely, romantic accents and overall the people are much more friendly and welcoming to visitors.

Although, I'm very nice 'cos I is English, innit?
Right. They seem a little more sensitive than us, would that be a fair observation. Like, not so used to ************ , not so tough even?

Their cities are not as grand though right? Dublin is about Manchester/Leeds size huh?
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yawn
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#103
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#103
(Original post by naivesincerity)
Right. They seem a little more sensitive than us, would that be a fair observation. Like, not so used to ************ , not so tough even?

Their cities are not as grand though right? Dublin is about Manchester/Leeds size huh?
This is all getting a bit silly, ns.

I see the Irish as very charming, inclined to friendliness rather than confrontational, and addressing any slight on their character by disarming it with their charm.

You might not see the Irish as that, but to be fair, one can only speak as they find, and I have never found one boorish, aggressive, overly 'tough' Irish person.

And the vibrancy and excitement of Galway city, for me, beats London any day. But that is my personal observation and others who haven't been there might not agree with me.

Meh...life is too short to get too stressed about competitiveness, isn't it?
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naivesincerity
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#104
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#104
(Original post by yawn)
This is all getting a bit silly, ns.

I see the Irish as very charming, inclined to friendliness rather than confrontational, and addressing any slight on their character by disarming it with their charm.

You might not see the Irish as that, but to be fair, one can only speak as they find, and I have never found one boorish, aggressive, overly 'tough' Irish person.

And the vibrancy and excitement of Galway city, for me, beats London any day. But that is my personal observation and others who haven't been there might not agree with me.

Meh...life is too short to get too stressed about competitiveness, isn't it?
We're agreeing! I said they weren't boorish! I'm surpirsed by how sensitive they are. Go on boards.ie and find out.
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yawn
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#105
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#105
(Original post by naivesincerity)
We're agreeing! I said they weren't boorish! I'm surpirsed by how sensitive they are. Go on boards.ie and find out.
Perhaps I misunderstood because I didn't know what your asterisks were replacing.

Do you mean sensitive as in empathetic or sensitive as in easily offended?

I must admit that here in Kent especially, people are extremely sensitive as in the latter...but then I'm a Londoner so I guess I've developed a thicker skin through necessity...and sometimes I can appear brusque despite my tendency to put myself in the shoes of others to understand where they're coming from...unless they're boorish, of course.

I don't contribute to other forums because I just love TSR!
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Howard
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#106
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#106
Being Irish is a social handicap that only people from Birmingham can fully appreciate.
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naivesincerity
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#107
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#107
(Original post by yawn)
Perhaps I misunderstood because I didn't know what your asterisks were replacing.

Do you mean sensitive as in empathetic or sensitive as in easily offended?

I must admit that here in Kent especially, people are extremely sensitive as in the latter...but then I'm a Londoner so I guess I've developed a thicker skin through necessity...and sometimes I can appear brusque despite my tendency to put myself in the shoes of others to understand where they're coming from...unless they're boorish, of course.

I don't contribute to other forums because I just love TSR!

I mean more empathic, and more offended by bluntness/straight talking.
Maybe it's different with Dubliners or country folk.
But they seem not quite as used to rejection, coldness, err harshness, bluster, insenstivity, detachment, confrontation etc

Almost emotionally naive.
I think a few would get in shock in SE England.

Like they are nice, but sometimes I find their compassion a little patronising. But then the English are more ******** than most peoples I think.
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username246000
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#108
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#108
The Irish are very proud of there country ever since they got independence and they should be. They have a good culture, good music, good ideals, a good HDI, they are actually above average in all aspects compared to other countries. A great country indeed. Many of my friends are Irish and am glad to have them.
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yawn
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Howard)
Being Irish is a social handicap that only people from Birmingham can fully appreciate.
I don't know of any Irish person who sees their Irishness as being a social handicap.

Just as we English don't see our Englishness as being a social handicap despite all things that were done in our name, both in the distant past and the more recent past, particularly in Dresden.
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yawn
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#110
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#110
(Original post by naivesincerity)
But then the English are more ******** than most peoples I think.
I'm sorry, ns but I can't make any guesses of what lies hidden under your eight asterisks. And consequently, can't formulate a comprehensive answer.
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Howard
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#111
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#111
(Original post by yawn)
I don't know of any Irish person who sees their Irishness as being a social handicap.

Just as we English don't see our Englishness as being a social handicap despite all things that were done in our name, both in the distant past and the more recent past, particularly in Dresden.
Dresdon? Odd thing to say.
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naivesincerity
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#112
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#112
(Original post by yawn)
I'm sorry, ns but I can't make any guesses of what lies hidden under your eight asterisks. And consequently, can't formulate a comprehensive answer.
T-wattish.
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yawn
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#113
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#113
(Original post by naivesincerity)
T-wattish.
OK...well yeah, we can be that without a doubt.
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naivesincerity
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#114
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#114
(Original post by cruciform)
The Irish are very proud of there country ever since they got independence and they should be. They have a good culture, good music, good ideals, a good HDI, they are actually above average in all aspects compared to other countries. A great country indeed. Many of my friends are Irish and am glad to have them.
They are independent. So are the French. But they still have to defer to our royals when they come here. And their culture aint great tbh, it's in the shadow of ours.
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yawn
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Howard)
Dresdon? Odd thing to say.
No so odd if you follow the logic of your comment on Birmingham.
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naivesincerity
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#116
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#116
(Original post by yawn)
OK...well yeah, we can be that without a doubt.
Mind you, I used to think we were the only snotty ones, but I think Scotland and Ireland has snobs aa plenty too.
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Howard
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#117
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#117
(Original post by yawn)
No so odd if you follow the logic of your comment on Birmingham.
Birmingham deserved to be bombed whereas Dresden didn't. I can feel a poem coming on......

Come friendly bombs and fall on Slough!
It isn't fit for humans now,
There isn't grass to graze a cow.
Swarm over, Death!
.........
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yawn
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#118
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#118
(Original post by naivesincerity)
Mind you, I used to think we were the only snotty ones, but I think Scotland and Ireland has snobs aa plenty too.
I don't know about Scotland, but I can definitely agree that Ireland has plenty of snobs, just like we do.
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yawn
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#119
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#119
(Original post by Howard)
Birmingham deserved to be bombed whereas Dresden didn't. I can feel a poem coming on......

Come friendly bombs and fall on Slough!
It isn't fit for humans now,
There isn't grass to graze a cow.
Swarm over, Death!
.........
I know you're being facetitious and don't really mean that, Howie - underneath that tough exterior, you're as soft as ****. (Do you get that one, ns?)

No, what I'm saying is that any criticisms of the bombing of Birmingham (whilst being a tradgedy) is not less worse than the bombing of Dresden which essentially had the same reasons for doing so.

Winston Churchill - memorandum to Air Marshall Arthur Harris(28th March 1945)

It seems to me that the moment has come when the question of bombing of German cities simply for the sake of increasing the terror, should be reviewed. Otherwise we shall come into control of an utterly ruined land. We shall not, for instance, be able to get housing material out of Germany for our own needs because some temporary provision would have to be made for the Germans themselves. I feel the need for more precise concentration upon military objectives, such as oil and communications behind the immediate battle-zone, rather than on mere acts of terror and wanton destruction.

David Pedlow, letter toThe Guardian(14th February, 2004)

My father was one of the "anonymous RAF meteorological officers (who) finally sealed Dresden's fate". A chronically short-sighted school teacher, he went into the Meteorological Office at the beginning of a war that he had hoped would not happen, but that he felt was utterly necessary. He knew he would be part of a process that sent young men out to risk their lives, and that inevitably - given the inadequacies of bomb-aiming and weather-forecasting techniques - would lead to a considerable number of civilian casualties.
The Dresden briefing was only one of many that he routinely attended, and even before the crews left the ground he was troubled because of one notable omission from the routine.
Normally, crews were given a strategic aiming point - anything from a major factory in the middle of nowhere to a small but significant railway junction within a built-up area. The smaller the aiming point and the heavier the concentration of housing around it, the greater would be the civilian casualties - but given that the strike was at a strategic aiming point those casualties could be justified.
Only at the Dresden briefing, my father told me, were the crews given no strategic aiming point. They were simply told that anywhere within the built-up area of the city would serve.
He felt that Dresden and its civilian population had been the prime target of the raid and that its destruction and their deaths served no strategic purpose, even in the widest terms; that this was a significant departure from accepting civilian deaths as a regrettable but inevitable consequence of the bomber war; and that he had been complicit in what was, at best, a very dubious operation.

Source: “War in the Air 1914-1945”
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Howard
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#120
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#120
(Original post by yawn)
I know you're being facetitious and don't really mean that, Howie - underneath that tough exterior, you're as soft as ****. (Do you get that one, ns?)

No, what I'm saying is that any criticisms of the bombing of Birmingham (whilst being a tradgedy) is not less worse than the bombing of Dresden which essentially had the same reasons for doing so.

[COLOR=#8080ff][B][URL="http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWchurchill.htm"]


Source: “War in the Air 1914-1945”
As soft as a pensioner's turd Yawn.

I think the bombing of Birmingham was a great act of public service by Mr.Hitler. It's a shame he didn't focus more of his energies on Luton though.
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