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    (Original post by add4)
    Hi, I know that to pass the year you need to pass 50 percent in every unit. I was just wondering how difficult is it to do this. Is it a challenge or fairly manageable would you say just purely based on peoples experience of the year. I'm just trying to visualise the task ahead of me. Thanks


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    50% is usually a 2.2 level which as long as you do your work you should be able to pass. I've passed the block 1 modules, except Spanish which I'm resitting in June, but thats because I'm not a natural language learner and it was hard to do. But, I was only 8% away from passing which wasn't as bad as I thought. I think that the lecturers say that as long as you go to your classes and do the work you should pass.

    I'm sure you'll be fine.

    Advice, if you need help with your work talk to either your advisor or module tutor. I find that having them look at the coursework before it is submitted makes a big difference
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    (Original post by criticalnature)
    Module/timetable question - Am I right in thinking that you only take 4 of the 12 modules each term for the foundation year?

    I was looking through the modules and read that for most you have 3 hours a week 'contact hours' for a total of around 30 hours and then another 70 hours in independent study. I'm trying to visualise the workload and instead I am confusing myself...
    I usually do about 60-70 hours per week in total. Contact time in the foundation year varies per subject. I have about 12 hours contact time this term. Science based modules may require more. There are about 4 modules per term, it all depends on the ucas points system.
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    Thank you that gives me a better understanding


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    Hey, I got offers from both KCL and Durham and am stuck between the two of them cause one guarantees a place for 1st year law and the other doesn't.
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    (Original post by Hegelian)
    I have an offer for the Law with Foundation degree and I will be at Hatfield college!
    Did you sit the LNAT? Because I didn't, still I have an offer and I'm not asked to sit and I wonder why.
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    Hi, which one doesn't completely get you a place like. I thought that once you got a place on foundation you are guaranteed a place on your chosen degree so long as you pass the foundation year. I'm sure that is the case. Go with your instinct both universities are extremely good


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    (Original post by add4)
    Hi, which one doesn't completely get you a place like. I thought that once you got a place on foundation you are guaranteed a place on your chosen degree so long as you pass the foundation year. I'm sure that is the case. Go with your instinct both universities are extremely good


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    I know, but KCL just doesn't guarantee a place, but I want KCL really bad, just not sure if I should take a risk.
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    What you could do is go with Kings and then put Durham down as your insurance I think. That way you get the best of both worlds and it is less of a risk


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    I received word from accommodation today, Van Mildert College! Does anyone know how you accept the offer for the Accommodation? Or is this tied in with my UCAS? As I already accepted to course and such, but it stated that the accommodation is pending. Thus, this is my accommodation and such already accepted?

    Also, they're good with people living out, aren't they?
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    (Original post by Himynameskiefer)
    I received word from accommodation today, Van Mildert College! Does anyone know how you accept the offer for the Accommodation? Or is this tied in with my UCAS? As I already accepted to course and such, but it stated that the accommodation is pending. Thus, this is my accommodation and such already accepted?

    Also, they're good with people living out, aren't they?
    I'm fairly sure that if you accept/reject the departmental offer, then the collegiate offer is treated the same way.


    "If you wish to live out of college during your first year please notify your college that you do not require accommodation as soon as you receive details of your college allocation. Contact details for each college can be found on individual college websites."
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    I'm fairly sure that if you accept/reject the departmental offer, then the collegiate offer is treated the same way.


    "If you wish to live out of college during your first year please notify your college that you do not require accommodation as soon as you receive details of your college allocation. Contact details for each college can be found on individual college websites."
    Thank you, man!
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    (Original post by naberbenbegum)
    Did you sit the LNAT? Because I didn't, still I have an offer and I'm not asked to sit and I wonder why.

    I did but I dont think you have to. I think we will have to sit it on the foundation year. I only sat it because I applied for direct entry to law at few places.
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    (Original post by ebowey)
    50% is usually a 2.2 level which as long as you do your work you should be able to pass. I've passed the block 1 modules, except Spanish which I'm resitting in June, but thats because I'm not a natural language learner and it was hard to do. But, I was only 8% away from passing which wasn't as bad as I thought. I think that the lecturers say that as long as you go to your classes and do the work you should pass.

    I'm sure you'll be fine.

    Advice, if you need help with your work talk to either your advisor or module tutor. I find that having them look at the coursework before it is submitted makes a big difference
    Luckily, I have no language modules. I can speak some Spanish and French, but I'd hate to be tested on it... Don't feel bad Spanish is difficult - my friend's family are Spanish and she still struggled through a gcse course.

    Its nice to know the staff are open to seeing your work before submission if you need help. Are they open/supportive through the work if you do find things challenging/confusing?

    (Original post by ebowey)
    I usually do about 60-70 hours per week in total. Contact time in the foundation year varies per subject. I have about 12 hours contact time this term. Science based modules may require more. There are about 4 modules per term, it all depends on the ucas points system.
    60-70 hours - would that be, for example, working 9am to 5pm and then a few hours in the evening, including weekends? Obviously excluding meals etc. Also are assignments fairly consistant in workload, or do some take longer than others depending on your strengths?

    I've looked at my own modules for the Health and Human Sciences foundation and have 3 contact hours (at least) for each, a week. Also it seems to be assessed by all different methods, with some have weekly exercises/worksheets in addition to the assignments.

    Is there a reading list, or suggested reading for each module? I'm seriously considering starting revision on the musculoskeletal system now :P
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    How did you find out how many contact hours you have for your modules?


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    (Original post by criticalnature)
    Luckily, I have no language modules. I can speak some Spanish and French, but I'd hate to be tested on it... Don't feel bad Spanish is difficult - my friend's family are Spanish and she still struggled through a gcse course.

    Its nice to know the staff are open to seeing your work before submission if you need help. Are they open/supportive through the work if you do find things challenging/confusing?



    60-70 hours - would that be, for example, working 9am to 5pm and then a few hours in the evening, including weekends? Obviously excluding meals etc. Also are assignments fairly consistant in workload, or do some take longer than others depending on your strengths?

    I've looked at my own modules for the Health and Human Sciences foundation and have 3 contact hours (at least) for each, a week. Also it seems to be assessed by all different methods, with some have weekly exercises/worksheets in addition to the assignments.

    Is there a reading list, or suggested reading for each module? I'm seriously considering starting revision on the musculoskeletal system now :P
    At the moment I'm at university for about 12, two half days and one full day. I tend to do my work in the evenings until 8 and then work in the afternoon/evenings at the weekends. But that's just me. You will find your own pattern of work. Do as much reading as you can before you start, even if it's just what you are interested in. It's a good way to get into the active reading thing. I didn't get my reading list until I started the module, which is a shame because some student prefer the preparation time. 60/70 hours a week all depends on the workload, but I tend to do more work than I need to

    The tutors are really supportive especially if you haven't studied certain subjects before.
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    Hello, does anyone know when the next wave of college allocations will be announced?
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    (Original post by add4)
    How did you find out how many contact hours you have for your modules?


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    I've been poking around dur.ac.uk a lot. I looked on the main prospective page of my course for the module titles/descriptions first. The foundation centre has specific lists for each course with links here: http://www.dur.ac.uk/foundation.centre/dpp/modules/

    Also as some had errors, (Academic English) I did a module search in the online handbook here: https://www.dur.ac.uk/faculty.handbook/

    You can get modules by department or search a specific one. The individual module descriptions give you the details of contact hours, content, assessment methods etc.


    (Original post by ebowey)
    At the moment I'm at university for about 12, two half days and one full day. I tend to do my work in the evenings until 8 and then work in the afternoon/evenings at the weekends. But that's just me. You will find your own pattern of work. Do as much reading as you can before you start, even if it's just what you are interested in. It's a good way to get into the active reading thing. I didn't get my reading list until I started the module, which is a shame because some student prefer the preparation time. 60/70 hours a week all depends on the workload, but I tend to do more work than I need to

    The tutors are really supportive especially if you haven't studied certain subjects before.
    My family brought me a pile of anthropology-based books, dvds etc for christmas so I could 'warm up'. Although I'm wondering as some of my courses seem quite specific, would the foundation department be open to releasing the reading lists early, if asked? Or, could advise as to what would be useful preparation?
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    (Original post by Emre944)
    Hello, does anyone know when the next wave of college allocations will be announced?
    Soon hopefully :P Are you waiting on Durham or Queen's based colleges?
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    (Original post by criticalnature)
    Soon hopefully :P Are you waiting on Durham or Queen's based colleges?
    Queen's, you?
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    (Original post by criticalnature)
    I've been poking around dur.ac.uk a lot. I looked on the main prospective page of my course for the module titles/descriptions first. The foundation centre has specific lists for each course with links here: http://www.dur.ac.uk/foundation.centre/dpp/modules/

    Also as some had errors, (Academic English) I did a module search in the online handbook here: https://www.dur.ac.uk/faculty.handbook/

    You can get modules by department or search a specific one. The individual module descriptions give you the details of contact hours, content, assessment methods etc.


    My family brought me a pile of anthropology-based books, dvds etc for christmas so I could 'warm up'. Although I'm wondering as some of my courses seem quite specific, would the foundation department be open to releasing the reading lists early, if asked? Or, could advise as to what would be useful preparation?
    There's no harm in asking.
 
 
 
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