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    (Original post by Pavzky)
    I assume section A is the single text as opposed to the comparative essay? If that's the case, then yes, a critical reading would suffice. Although, depending on what the question asks and how appropriate your reading is, it may be difficult to write that much to gain enough AO3 marks. Regardless, for my text (King Lear), I will have an interpretation ready and just a quote or two from critics if I need them.

    What texts are you doing for sections A and B?

    (Original post by abismall)
    I would get a couple of generic critic quotes if I were you, just to make sure that you get the marks! They don't have to be long ones.


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    Ahh alright, I'll just remember a few generic critical quotes then, thanks!

    Pavzky, I'm doing The Tempest for Section A, 'Tis Pity and The Wife of Bath for Section B
    How about you?
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    (Original post by abismall)
    Yes! Literally not seen anyone else doing it!
    What structural points do you have?

    I am so worried about what questions they are going to ask and only really feel prepared for anything about antony and cleopatra's relationship!
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    (Original post by garyheehee)
    Ahh alright, I'll just remember a few generic critical quotes then, thanks!

    Pavzky, I'm doing The Tempest for Section A, 'Tis Pity and The Wife of Bath for Section B
    How about you?
    How else do you get marks for AO3 besides critical quotes as I know you can get one for your own interpretation but how do you enforce that as I always seems to fall down on that!
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    (Original post by garyheehee)
    Ahh alright, I'll just remember a few generic critical quotes then, thanks!

    Pavzky, I'm doing The Tempest for Section A, 'Tis Pity and The Wife of Bath for Section B
    How about you?
    Ah, I'm doing King Lear for A and The Rivals with WoB for B.
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    can they ask us a (king lear) character question on Albany/Kent/Gloucester/Cornwall/Edgar do you think? I don't think there's as much to talk about than the other characters!! (basically i dont have enough info for those characters whoops)
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    (Original post by hootee)
    can they ask us a (king lear) character question on Albany/Kent/Gloucester/Cornwall/Edgar do you think? I don't think there's as much to talk about than the other characters!! (basically i dont have enough info for those characters whoops)
    Yeah, they can. It can be annoying - I'd rather there was a question on a theme/concept but, having said that, some questions that focus on characters are pretty good. Some examples of questions I've done/come across are:

    - To what extent is Lear a tragic hero, or does he get what he deserves? (I did this question and I loved it xD)

    - 'Kent's role in the play is often undervalued; he is more important than he seems.'
    Consider this notion by evaluating the role of Kent in King Lear.
    (Looking at it, it looks like a terrible question for me - I've always overlooked the role of Kent and instead focused on the main characters)

    - 'Disguise and deception is vitally important to the play's effects.'
    In light of this view, consider the role of Edgar in the play.
    (Didn't particularly like this question)

    (There was another question about the role of the fool but I can't remember it - sorry

    Plus, just remember that if there is a character-orientated question, you can argue it either way and, hopefully, you'll have more to talk about.
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    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    How else do you get marks for AO3 besides critical quotes as I know you can get one for your own interpretation but how do you enforce that as I always seems to fall down on that!
    I think if you apply different interpretations eg a feminist interpretation would.... / a freudian interpretation would....

    Apparently interpretations of performance also count for AO3, so if you are discussing say, King Lear, you could talk about a production of the play in the 1600s and how it applies to the question or your point.

    There's some exemplar scripts on the OCR website too which point out where the candidates get marks for different AOs so you could probably check that out too.
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    Hi! I'm comparing Paradise Lost Book IX and 'Tis Pity for section B.

    But I'm really struggling with how to structure the essay as a whole! Does anyone have a specimen plan or some sort of way they have to structure the comparison essay? Thanks!
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    (Original post by tommoxham)
    In our final class of the year pre-exam, we went through all the major themes e.g. colonialism, relationships, sexuality, desire and deception. You can draw comparisons between all the characters in one or more of these sub-topics, however, the exam is AO2 (quotations) and AO3 (critics) weighted. So, as long as you can support your argument with some quotations that solidify your point, and then show a critic who agrees with you, everything should be alright.
    Yeah, I completely agree. I think it's going to be a really general question in order to allow candidates to explore their interpretations because you've got to remember, this is the first year with the new texts and so I believe OCR will be more accepting of less conventional interpretations.
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    (Original post by itunesfestival95)
    Hi! I'm comparing Paradise Lost Book IX and 'Tis Pity for section B.

    But I'm really struggling with how to structure the essay as a whole! Does anyone have a specimen plan or some sort of way they have to structure the comparison essay? Thanks!
    Hey, I can try and help (although I'm doing completely different texts, lol). I'm not sure this is what you're looking for exactly but, generally for a comparative essay, I'd structure it like this:

    - Intro

    - Point 1:
    Talk about Paradise Lost
    Compare/contrast with 'Tis Pity

    - Point 2:
    Paradise Lost
    'Tis Pity

    - Point 3
    Paradise Lost
    'Tis Pity

    I'd try to include my AO3 reading with the point that it's most closely related to somewhere, just slotting it in. I find (and my teacher says) structuring it a/b - a/b - a/b etc. is much more effective as you can compare/contrast at every available point and it's much more coherent overall as opposed to writing entirely about one text then comparing it to another because it's difficult to see where you've done AO3.

    And so on, then conclude. I just try to make 3 points and compare/contrast with the texts, at half a page each for each point so I end up with 3 sides of the main body then a page in total for intro, conclusion and reading. Hope that I helped - sorry I couldn't be more specific - I'm doing The Rivals and WoB
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    (Original post by pallari5)
    Yes! do you need help?
    I think I'm feeling a lot better with this now, I've got all my quotes, context and a03 down so just hoping one of the questions will be the obvious one, i don't see how it cant be really. its just slightly disconcerting that no one else is doing this! How are you finding it?
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    (Original post by itunesfestival95)
    Hi! I'm comparing Paradise Lost Book IX and 'Tis Pity for section B. But I'm really struggling with how to structure the essay as a whole! Does anyone have a specimen plan or some sort of way they have in order to structure the comparison essay? Thanks!
    I'm doing exactly the same!!! I found it hard at first but now its getting better
    Okay well I'm doing mine with 4 main paragraphs and then introduction and conclusion.

    I think it's really important to make sure you have four main points to argue your answer to the question and these fit in with both texts, of course the paragraphs don't have to be equally split between the books, but if you mainly talk about one just make sure you link it back.
    They are not asking us to like compare at every available opportunity as that will lose the agreement and a01 as it won't flow very well but just make sure you know what your argument is and show this.
    Ill do my example;

    Paragraph 1- point 1- sum up in one clear line e.g 'corruption in the texts is shown though the conduct of religion.'
    -explain how shown in tis pity with quotes and analysis.
    -back this up with some a04 to perhaps shown why it has been done.
    -show how similar in paradise lost, quote and explain
    -why this adds to your argument
    -other interpretations a03 and if you agree and how this adds to your argument.
    -sum up why this point is important and leads you to your argument.

    Okay, I'm sorry that came out quite complex it turns out it is harder to explain. I wish I could send you an essay but they are hand written!!!
    I hope that's even a tiny bit helpful, and remember the questions will be so general thank god
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    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    How else do you get marks for AO3 besides critical quotes as I know you can get one for your own interpretation but how do you enforce that as I always seems to fall down on that!

    You don't have to necessarily quote critics (though it can't hurt) - If you don't know a quote about a specific thing you can say things like "while many critics believe that...", "the prevalent view among critics about...is..." just to show that you know there are other possible interpretations.
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    (Original post by Cest la vie)
    What structural points do you have?

    I am so worried about what questions they are going to ask and only really feel prepared for anything about antony and cleopatra's relationship!
    I wouldn't worry too much about the question! I think it's going to be relatively easy/broad considering its the first time Anthony and Cleopatra has been on the syllabus. I'm thinking it's gonna be to do with Anthony as the tragic hero, Something to do with the presentation of Cleo, the relationship, or the contrast between Rome and Egypt, so it's pretty much the same content and material for most of the essays! Do you mean structural points in terms of the play, or how to structure an essay?


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    I'm doing Lear, Rivals and Wife of Bath too! Woop. What kind of things do you think they'll ask about Rivals/WOB? Power, love/marriage, women, education, authority of texts, deceit, comedy... Anything else? Do you think it's worth learning loads of critic quotes about whether or not Rivals is sentimental? I have so many photocopies of critics arguing about it... Also, what do people think about the Tale and Prologue? Is Chaucer feminist/anti-feminist and why, according to you? Thoughts on the Prologue? In my class we've said that the Tale shows a balance of power at the end (as much as can be expected in medieval Britain), except that the Wife doesn't really understand her own Tale and adds her bit cursing men.

    Arghh, I'm so scared about this exam. I hate that there are no specimen papers or anything for ideas about this particular text. :/

    Oh, and how are people revising? I'm typing up quotes into themes and just hoping that my essay-writing skills will magically get better by next week...
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    (Original post by cornflaked)
    I'm doing Lear, Rivals and Wife of Bath too! Woop. What kind of things do you think they'll ask about Rivals/WOB? Power, love/marriage, women, education, authority of texts, deceit, comedy... Anything else? Do you think it's worth learning loads of critic quotes about whether or not Rivals is sentimental? I have so many photocopies of critics arguing about it... Also, what do people think about the Tale and Prologue? Is Chaucer feminist/anti-feminist and why, according to you? Thoughts on the Prologue? In my class we've said that the Tale shows a balance of power at the end (as much as can be expected in medieval Britain), except that the Wife doesn't really understand her own Tale and adds her bit cursing men.

    Arghh, I'm so scared about this exam. I hate that there are no specimen papers or anything for ideas about this particular text. :/

    Oh, and how are people revising? I'm typing up quotes into themes and just hoping that my essay-writing skills will magically get better by next week...
    Yay *hi5*

    Regarding themes, I think you've got them spot on. Off the top of my head I really can't think of anything else that binds the two texts. I wouldn't worry. Perhaps (I did an essay question on this), what women want/desire - it's more specific but the links are obvious.

    Again, I wouldn't worry too much at all with critics' quotes. A feminist or Marxist reading can fit in regardless as one of the focal points of both texts is the idea of class - the WoB is a lower class woman who demands power in a relationship over her men (where women would typically be subordinates to men, so a role reversal here) and Lydia wants to elope with an ensign which was deemed impractical, given the marriage customs at the time - a woman was expected to marry a man who would financially support her. Instead, it's the opposite - Lydia has the money and Ensign Beverley has nothing (although Jack does) and also how Malaprop was denied an education because she's a woman. Just focus on the readings - bring in a quote or two if you want. I found Oliver Goldsmith: A Comparison Between a Laughing and a Sentimental Comedy quite helpful though I'm really sorry I can't find the link!

    I'd be cautious saying Chaucer is a feminist/anti-feminist - he's using the WoB as a mouthpiece to express controversial views - not his own. I'd only talk about this when I bring in my feminist reading, though. I'd say the WoB does try to better the status of women but she isn't a feminist because she tries to gain power over men. This is not a principle of feminism - feminism is about equality and the WoB does not try to put women on the same level as men, but in a higher position. Then just bring in AO4 by saying this is an anachronism as feminism didn't exist in Middle England.

    The bit about the Tale does show a balance of power right at the end but it's also what the Wife wants - the knight let the hag make the decision (hence, shifting his power to her) and then power is balanced. It still very much focuses on sovereignty until that point but in a less crude way that expressed in the Prologue.

    Don't worry about the exam, you'll be fine! I've had 5 teachers since September and I had no confidence but I've been doing quite well in essays so I feel better now

    Content-wise, all you need to know are themes and short quotes. As you write your essay, the rest will naturally come to you. Just remember to compare/contrast at every point you make and use signalling words like 'conversely, in The Rivals...' or 'similarly, The Wife of Bath...'

    Hope I helped. Sorry it was a bit length (like the Prologue xD). Best of luck with your exam! Do you have Skype/Twitter or anything so we could perhaps share ideas?
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    How many quotes and critics quotes do people recommend ? Please answer
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    (Original post by Xena9002)
    How many quotes and critics quotes do people recommend ? Please answer
    I'm curious about this too. I have 20 for The Rivals which are short and easy to learn and I hope to have at maximum 25 for The Wife Of Bath. Haven't really started Shakespeare yet or the critics but I should imagine that I'll have around 100 when all's said and done.
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    (Original post by abismall)
    I wouldn't worry too much about the question! I think it's going to be relatively easy/broad considering its the first time Anthony and Cleopatra has been on the syllabus. I'm thinking it's gonna be to do with Anthony as the tragic hero, Something to do with the presentation of Cleo, the relationship, or the contrast between Rome and Egypt, so it's pretty much the same content and material for most of the essays! Do you mean structural points in terms of the play, or how to structure an essay?


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    Structural points in terms of the play
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    Does anyone fancy just putting what texts your doing, then the most obvious themes between them? (Section B) Then we'll hopefully get a list of all the possible themes, because the examiners have to cater the questions to all themes and texts, and given its the first year of these texts you'd hope they won't throw obscure questions and themes at us...

    i'll start, and if no one replies then...well...I'm alright with that. Lol

    Blake's Songs of Innocence and Webster's The White Devil
    Themes:
    Corruption- State and Religion
    Love, Lust and Desire
    Young and Old
    Sin and Punishment
 
 
 
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