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AQA AS History - Unit 1M - USA 1890-1945- Tuesday 14th may 2013 Watch

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    (Original post by chelseafan)
    3 for and 3 against. Although our teacher said we can do 4 if they're detailed.
    Ah right, I did that and got an okay mark (18/24) so I may stick to that...thanks
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    6?!
    It depends on the question.

    If it was how successful, do 3 for, 3 against

    If it's how far, then 1 factor for then 3 others
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    No way we dont have enough time for 6 detailed reasons with links. I usually go for about 4 with specific detail and making links is essential fir top marks. Of course if you can give more than 4 reasons go for it

    I think for 99 per cent ww2 gonna to come up.
    Can someone explain me how influencive was Atlantic Charter for entry to ww2?

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    And you have to be able to go a conclusion and evaluate at the end
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    Have any of you guys got good notes/powerpoints on the following:
    *Spanish American war
    *the growth of organised crime
    *the effect of organised crime on society

    I would love for why the US didn't join the League of Nations to come up but I have different points to you:
    1)-War weariness due to world war 1, the consequences meant that the Americans turned against 'Europe's war'
    2)-Influence of key personalities e.g. Senator Henry Lodge
    3)-Opposition from committed isolationists e.g. Senator William and the public (Thought the Treaty of Versailles was too harsh of Germany)

    Are these points good enough, obviously I would expand on them
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    Can anyone have a look at this? Just did it under timed conditions (handwritten).

    Thanks

    Explain why Warren Harding won the Presidential election of 1920. (12 marks)

    There were many reasons Harding won the 1920 election, however, the most important factors were that he talked about a policy of normalcy, the Democrats had lost support and Harding was a Prohibitionist which won him the support of the WCTU who could vote for the first time in 1920.

    After WWI, American affairs were still focused abroad despite the domestic problems such as Prohibition. Harding promised the people if he got into power then he'd make things normal again. This policy of "normalcy" gained him the support necessary to win because people wanted American priorities to come first.

    Another reason Harding won was because of the Democrats' unpopularity. The Democrats were blamed for the deaths of many US servicemen during WWI. People believed they died unnecessarily for a cause that didn't really affect the USA. People were also disillusioned with the Democrats because of Wilson's "obsession" with the League of Nations. Many thought post-war peace was not worth it and, therefore, switched their vote to the Republicans.

    The final reasons was that Harding was a Prohibitionist and Cox, the Democrats' candidate, opposed Prohibition. Harding won the support of Prohibitionists and more importantly the Women's Christian Temperance union - staunch Prohibitionists. 1920 was the first year women could vote and the WCTU turned out in large numbers to get a Prohibitionist in the White House.

    In conclusion, I believe the most important factor that led to Harding winning the election was that he offered a policy of 'normalcy'; this was what the US people wanted. Secondly, the unpopularity of the Democrats meant many Democrats switched their support to the Republicans. Finally, the support of Prohibitionists also helped Harding triumph.
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    Yepp, its really good!! Three solid points with a conclusion linking them ... Do you have notes on organised crime?
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    (Original post by adelinanuhija)
    Yepp, its really good!! Three solid points with a conclusion linking them ... Do you have notes on organised crime?
    Thanks I do:

    The fight against organised crime and the reasons for the end of Prohibition
    How successful was FDR in his fight against organised crime?
    · Myth: Organised crime confronted and defeated by heroes such as Elliot Ness and his ‘Untouchables’ and J. Edgar Hoover and the ‘G-Men’ of the FBI
    · Downfall of Al Capone (1931) and deaths of leading gangsters such as John Dillinger were landmark events
    · End of 1930s – Violent crime widely reduced, and no more spectacular shootouts – like the assault on Capone’s HQ by the O’Banion gang in 1926 – took place
    · Reality: No clear victory for law enforcement
    · Organised crime was still powerful
    · Corruption in the police and local government remained widespread
    · Apparent victories for law enforcement, were explained by the fact bootlegging was no longer an issue after Prohibition’s repeal in 1933
    · WW2 – Organised crime in partnership with federal government
    · ‘Lucky’ Luciano and his mafia networks worked closely with the US Navy intelligence during the war against fascist Italy
    · Many factors made it difficult for FDR to successfully fight organised crime:
    o Amount of money available for law enforcement was a fraction compared to that of criminals and gangsters
    o Bribery and corruption in law enforcement meant criminals could be protected
    o Most crimes, including robbery and murder, came under state law; meaning criminals were safe once they cross state lines
    o Many Americans disliked the enforcement of Prohibition and they secretly admired well-known gangsters

    What role did J. Edgar Hoover and the rise of the FBI play in the fight against organised crime?
    · 1933Homer Cummings, FDR’s Attorney General, declares ‘war on crime’
    · Reaction to public opinion that crime was undermining society
    · Public perception of crime warped by media
    · Films like ‘Little Caesar – 1931’, ‘Scarface – 1931’ were about gangsters
    · Hoover led fight against organised crime
    · Hoover started his career at Justice Dept. in 1919 and took part in Palmer Raids 1920
    · 1921 – Deputy Director of the Bureau of Investigation, and later Acting Director
    · Brought in systematic, and bureaucratic methods
    · Used scientific methods and opened a forensic lab. in 1932
    · Hoover was highly effective in winning political support and financial backing
    · 1934 – Bureau of Investigation got rule over large range of interstate crimes such as car theft and kidnapping
    · 1935 – Bureau of Investigation became FBI, Hoover as its Director; held job for 37yrs
    · Hoover’s reputation was improved by successes against Kelly (1933), Dillinger (1934), Baker (1935), Karpis (1936)
    · All these had extensive press coverage, led by Hearst’s newspaper empire and Hollywood
    · Rush of films glorifying ‘G-Men’
    · FBI benefited from Hoover’s publicity machine and kept a high reputation in US public’s eyes
    · Continued through war years and into 1950s
    · Several TV programmes promoted the FBI
    · 1960s – FBI’s reputation came under attack
    · Hoover’s critics said men like Dillinger were individuals and that Hoover did little to stop organised crime
    · Hoover remains controversial, accused of cutting civil liberties, bending the truth to exaggerate his success and blackmailing leading politicians by holding secret files
    · On the other hand, he turned the FBI into a large and efficient crime-stopping machine
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    Thank you so much
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    (Original post by adelinanuhija)
    Thank you so much
    No probs
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    No probs
    Dont worry about an introduction for answers as it gains 0 marks and you can spend more time developing points?
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    (Original post by Xx4L3x)
    Dont worry about an introduction for answers as it gains 0 marks and you can spend more time developing points?
    2 line introduction is fine. Sets the tone for the essay.
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    (Original post by Xx4L3x)
    Dont worry about an introduction for answers as it gains 0 marks and you can spend more time developing points?
    My teacher said we should He said it gives structure to the essay and saves you planning. We can get marks for SPAG I believe
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    Well I went through the past papers and found a horrible question. It was pretty hard and I just did it under timed conditions (hand written) etc.

    Could you take a look? I feel the immigration act part is scrappy. Any ideas on mark/grade?

    Thanks all

    How far did the USA maintain a policy of isolationism in foreign affairs during the 1920s? (24 marks)

    The USA wasn't completely isolationist in the 1920s. They restructured german war debts and held the Washington Naval Conference in 1921. However, they did maintain a policy of normalcy and introduce many immigration acts.

    America was interventionist in the sense that US financiers were responsible for restructuring Germans war debts. The Dawes Plan of 1924 and Young Plan of 1928 enabled the Germans to pay the debts in instalments. All of this restructuring was oversaw by US financiers. The fact US financiers were sorting out other nations' finances is testament to them being interventionist.

    Another factor to suggest the US was interventionist is that they hosted the Washington Naval Conference in 1921. This conference was aimed at naval disarmament and attended by many superpowers. The fact the USA was hosting a military conference, involving other nations, shows that they were still at the epicentre of world affairs and, therefore, not completely isolationist.

    However, Harding's 'normalcy' policy ensured domestic problems came first. Prohibition and racial tension were two main events happening in the USA in the 1920s. Harding believe resolving American issues was more important than international affairs. He and his successor made many attempts to stop racial tension by limiting immigration with immigration acts.

    Immigration acts also show the US was isolationist for two reasons. One, Harding believed US issues, such as resolving racial tension was important; he introduced the Emergency Quota Act of 1921 to stop no more than 3% of the US population immigrants coming to the USA. This was unsuccessful because millions still turned up. The second reason this shows US isolationism was that Harding was trying to stop international influence in the USA. For instance, if lots of Italians came into the USA and Italy was invaded they might pressure the government into intervening. The main reason that shows isolationism was that Harding was prioritising US problems like racial tension.

    In conclusion, I believe the US was more interventionist than isolationist because they played a major part in restructuring Germany's war debts. The US also hosted the Washington Naval Conference that shows the US was still at the centre of world affairs. However, they were also isolationist because Harding maintained a policy of 'normalcy' and the use of immigration acts shows this.
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    My teacher said we should He said it gives structure to the essay and saves you planning. We can get marks for SPAG I believe
    What' SPAG haha

    My teacher gets a few exam paper scripts back in September to see what students wrote and she photocopied some for us and most of them got 12 and get never wrote an introduction, it's more about links
    But if your teacher has said to write one, do it, I get that it's part of a good structure
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    (Original post by Xx4L3x)
    What' SPAG haha

    My teacher gets a few exam paper scripts back in September to see what students wrote and she photocopied some for us and most of them got 12 and get never wrote an introduction, it's more about links
    But if your teacher has said to write one, do it, I get that it's part of a good structure
    Spelling, punctuation and grammar.

    I will just out of habit
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    I agree with you, my teacher also likes introductions
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Well I went through the past papers and found a horrible question. It was pretty hard and I just did it under timed conditions (hand written) etc.

    Could you take a look? I feel the immigration act part is scrappy. Any ideas on mark/grade?

    Thanks all

    How far did the USA maintain a policy of isolationism in foreign affairs during the 1920s? (24 marks)

    The USA wasn't completely isolationist in the 1920s. They restructured german war debts and held the Washington Naval Conference in 1921. However, they did maintain a policy of normalcy and introduce many immigration acts.

    America was interventionist in the sense that US financiers were responsible for restructuring Germans war debts. The Dawes Plan of 1924 and Young Plan of 1928 enabled the Germans to pay the debts in instalments. All of this restructuring was oversaw by US financiers. The fact US financiers were sorting out other nations' finances is testament to them being interventionist.

    Another factor to suggest the US was interventionist is that they hosted the Washington Naval Conference in 1921. This conference was aimed at naval disarmament and attended by many superpowers. The fact the USA was hosting a military conference, involving other nations, shows that they were still at the epicentre of world affairs and, therefore, not completely isolationist.

    However, Harding's 'normalcy' policy ensured domestic problems came first. Prohibition and racial tension were two main events happening in the USA in the 1920s. Harding believe resolving American issues was more important than international affairs. He and his successor made many attempts to stop racial tension by limiting immigration with immigration acts.

    Immigration acts also show the US was isolationist for two reasons. One, Harding believed US issues, such as resolving racial tension was important; he introduced the Emergency Quota Act of 1921 to stop no more than 3% of the US population immigrants coming to the USA. This was unsuccessful because millions still turned up. The second reason this shows US isolationism was that Harding was trying to stop international influence in the USA. For instance, if lots of Italians came into the USA and Italy was invaded they might pressure the government into intervening. The main reason that shows isolationism was that Harding was prioritising US problems like racial tension.

    In conclusion, I believe the US was more interventionist than isolationist because they played a major part in restructuring Germany's war debts. The US also hosted the Washington Naval Conference that shows the US was still at the centre of world affairs. However, they were also isolationist because Harding maintained a policy of 'normalcy' and the use of immigration acts shows this.
    17 to 20 I'd say?
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    Its out of 24 marks
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    No introduction for 12m question, only 3 paragraphs explaining 3 different reasons.

    But for 24m you must have introduction and conclusion.

    Anyone know how important was Atlantic Charter for entry to ww2?? What about importance of neutrality acts? Lend-lease? Cash sn carry act?
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