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    Helping a few people just with starting lifting. Most problems have been easy to fix like scapula retraction, grip width on bench press etc, or flexibility/ engaging muscles during the squat.

    However my flatmates deadlift is just baffling. Reasonably sure not engaging glutes and lats, but if anyone else has an opinion/ an idea how to help that'd be great. As much as I know the basics well, I'm not quite coach cucumber (Inb4 IOE trolls me )

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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Helping a few people just with starting lifting. Most problems have been easy to fix like scapula retraction, grip width on bench press etc, or flexibility/ engaging muscles during the squat.

    However my flatmates deadlift is just baffling. Reasonably sure not engaging glutes and lats, but if anyone else has an opinion/ an idea how to help that'd be great. As much as I know the basics well, I'm not quite coach cucumber (Inb4 IOE trolls me )

    Not that I can deadlift for **** but I'd start with getting him comfortable with start position. He doesn't seem to know where he's going and that's one of the main things that helped me learn to sumo, other stuff just fell into place. Include sorting his head position in that- I suspect he may be confusing chest up with try to look over your head which would be a general sign of not knowing how to get his upper body tight. Then see what he ends up with once he's got that and take it from there
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    (Original post by BKS)
    Not that I can deadlift for **** but I'd start with getting him comfortable with start position. He doesn't seem to know where he's going and that's one of the main things that helped me learn to sumo, other stuff just fell into place. Include sorting his head position in that- I suspect he may be confusing chest up with try to look over your head which would be a general sign of not knowing how to get his upper body tight. Then see what he ends up with once he's got that and take it from there
    What do you reckon on sorting out upper body tightness?

    Snatch grip deads for a while maybe?

    And for learning start position - just lots of practice?

    Thanks for the reply mate
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    What do you reckon on sorting out upper body tightness?

    Snatch grip deads for a while maybe?

    And for learning start position - just lots of practice?

    Thanks for the reply mate
    I think snatch grip will add extra things to confuse him, I say you want to drill the basics to hell before you start any variations.

    I'd start with the start position. First work out where you want him to be, if you don't already by moving him without explaining. Get him to stand up, get into position without instruction, give a few cues to correct, repeat until he gets those, add more cues if needed.

    It might be you even need to break down the movement to get him to take instruction the right way- though that's quick to do. Like teach him to hip hinge properly, bend down with knees over toes vs shins upright etc. It might sound patronising but folk who don't do anything sport like can have pretty bad...like mind body connection....I forget the word....spatial reasoning?

    Tightness, maybe get him doing it standing. Does he have ok posture? If not start there. Make sure he knows how to flex his lats. Like again, assume nothing, really beak it down
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    (Original post by BKS)
    I think snatch grip will add extra things to confuse him, I say you want to drill the basics to hell before you start any variations.

    I'd start with the start position. First work out where you want him to be, if you don't already by moving him without explaining. Get him to stand up, get into position without instruction, give a few cues to correct, repeat until he gets those, add more cues if needed.

    It might be you even need to break down the movement to get him to take instruction the right way- though that's quick to do. Like teach him to hip hinge properly, bend down with knees over toes vs shins upright etc. It might sound patronising but folk who don't do anything sport like can have pretty bad...like mind body connection....I forget the word.

    Tightness, maybe get him doing it standing. Does he have ok posture? If not start there. Make sure he knows how to flex his lats. Like again, assume nothing, really beak it down
    Cool will do

    He's a cyclist normally, president of the cycling society at uni etc. Has mind muscle connection, but nothing glutes wise. I think he pitches forward from a lack of glute activation. Will look more at it and will break it down for him

    Thanks again
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    What do you reckon on sorting out upper body tightness?

    Snatch grip deads for a while maybe?

    And for learning start position - just lots of practice?

    Thanks for the reply mate
    Have him watch this before your next session

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xS2w...UUBI1TGjNSKUWB

    The youtube playlist is a 9 video series called so you think you can deadlift, super informative.
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    Looks like he lowers at points without using his lower body and then suddenly finishes the decent with a flute/hamstring movement. Using techniques to help keep the bar closer at all times and use the lats more, I would use Maybe a snatch grip deadlift on blocks as it takes out the extra range of motion and flexibility that would be needed which would cause problems and help with to focus on the part he wants to, which is pulling the bar close.
 
 
 
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