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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    High civilian gun ownership is something that I also find hard to understand (and think people should require lots of training before being able to have a gun), but this just seems such a petty issue when you're talking about the role the US has in international geopolitics and trying to imagine a world without it. No liberation of Europe, the Cold war won by Russia, Asia looking like a big version of North Korea, etc. And that's before you even start to talk about its cultural and scientific impact. I'm not a gung-ho pro-American in that I don't think everything it has given is positive, but overall I'm a fan.
    As for gun ownership and the popularity of guns in the U.S.. Until the turn of the century only 7% of us lived in the cities. For the remainder a gun was an absolute necessity. We grew up with them in our homes. They weren't evil things that killed people. There were evil people that killed people and they usually used a gun but the gun was an innocent participant; just a thing. Most men learn to shoot from their fathers. It's a very entrenched tradition. A coming of age thing for a lot of males. It is a VERY big deal when you find your first Daisy BB gun under the Christmas tree,(I got mine at age 9), it means your a "big boy" now. Usually around 13-14yrs. of age, if your parents determine you have the sense God gave a goose, you get your first 22cal. rifle. I could go on but I hope you get the pic. Guns are for some a very big part of important turning points in our lives. Some people like guns because guns are fun. Target shooting is a blast. I could write a very long list of the reasons people enjoy gun ownership. From the reasons I have mentioned can you see why people feel threatened when told the gov. has as their goal a gun free society? What I've mentioned above are reasons people like guns; not reasons why we should be allowed to keep them. We don't need any justifications for gun ownership.
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    I have been to the west coast. Would love to visit the east coast.
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    Many people in the UK and other countries find it hard to understand how people can support the relaxation of gun laws. The lack of gun crime in the UK means we don't understand how Americans can accept gun violence on that scale.
    When you hear about gun deaths in the U.S. remember you are hearing about every death connected with guns including; suicides, accidental discharge, police shootings, hunting accidents, justifiable shootings, and criminal homicides. If I remember correctly, FBI stats say all crimes committed with firearms have dropped by 30-40% in the last twenty years. A lot of that can be attributed to an aging population; there's been less crime all around. You don't here much about that, do you? It would be easier to understand why some support the relaxation of gun laws if you understand there never should have been restrictions on it in the first place.
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    (Original post by Oldcon1953)
    When you hear about gun deaths in the U.S. remember you are hearing about every death connected with guns including; suicides, accidental discharge, police shootings, hunting accidents, justifiable shootings, and criminal homicides. If I remember correctly, FBI stats say all crimes committed with firearms have dropped by 30-40% in the last twenty years. A lot of that can be attributed to an aging population; there's been less crime all around. You don't here much about that, do you? It would be easier to understand why some support the relaxation of gun laws if you understand there never should have been restrictions on it in the first place.
    Yes I get this but it is still very tragic when you read that a young boy playing with his dad's gun accidentaly shot his sister. Events like this I think make it hard to justify gun ownership. I recently read that Georgia had relaxed some of it's gun laws regarding schools and churches. Which surprised me considering the recent school shootings that have taken place.
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    Yes I get this but it is still very tragic when you read that a young boy playing with his dad's gun accidentaly shot his sister. Events like this I think make it hard to justify gun ownership. I recently read that Georgia had relaxed some of it's gun laws regarding schools and churches. Which surprised me considering the recent school shootings that have taken place.
    With all respect, I don't think you do get it. On the same day that young boy was accidentally shot, how many boys were accidentally ran over in the street? How many kids accidentally ingested poison? How many children were accidentally killed in the same manner children have always been killed? These don't even make the news because they don't further the left wing liberal agenda of creating a gun free society. I don't think a childs death from a handgun is anymore tragic then their accidental death by any other means. They are all EQUALLY tragic. Gun control isn't about saving lives anyway. It has simply become an issue that people use to identify which end of the political spectrum they are on.
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    (Original post by Oldcon1953)
    With all respect, I don't think you do get it. On the same day that young boy was accidentally shot, how many boys were accidentally ran over in the street? How many kids accidentally ingested poison? How many children were accidentally killed in the same manner children have always been killed? These don't even make the news because they don't further the left wing liberal agenda of creating a gun free society. I don't think a childs death from a handgun is anymore tragic then their accidental death by any other means. They are all EQUALLY tragic. Gun control isn't about saving lives anyway. It has simply become an issue that people use to identify which end of the political spectrum they are on.
    Remember my opinion is from the perspective of someone who has never even seen a gun, hasn't grown up wanting to own a gun, and will never own a gun. That's the culture in the UK and it makes it difficult for us to understand how they can play such a big part of some cultures in the US.

    I am not criticising it i am just stating why many in the UK find it incredible that they can keep guns legal despite the 'few' tragedys we hear about.
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    Remember my opinion is from the perspective of someone who has never even seen a gun, hasn't grown up wanting to own a gun, and will never own a gun. That's the culture in the UK and it makes it difficult for us to understand how they can play such a big part of some cultures in the US.

    I am not criticising it i am just stating why many in the UK find it incredible that they can keep guns legal despite the 'few' tragedys we hear about.
    There is also also another aspect of gun ownership. Everyday someone saves their life or the life of another with a gun. A number of years ago I was able to stop what quite probably would have been a fatal beating of a man by three men simply by pulling out a gun and firing a shot into the air. But even apart from the self defense aspect there is the social/political perspective. I am very comforted by knowing our Gov. realizes that there are 4-5 hundred million handguns and God knows how many long guns in the hands of the citizens. What truly bothers me is their incessant attempts to demonize law abiding gun owners in an attempt to disarm the population. That makes me very nervous.
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    (Original post by Oldcon1953)
    There is also also another aspect of gun ownership. Everyday someone saves their life or the life of another with a gun. A number of years ago I was able to stop what quite probably would have been a fatal beating of a man by three men simply by pulling out a gun and firing a shot into the air. But even apart from the self defense aspect there is the social/political perspective. I am very comforted by knowing our Gov. realizes that there are 4-5 hundred million handguns and God knows how many long guns in the hands of the citizens. What truly bothers me is their incessant attempts to demonize law abiding gun owners in an attempt to disarm the population. That makes me very nervous.
    I agree, and considering the sheer amount of guns in the US it would basically be impossible to make them illegal.
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    (Original post by Oldcon1953)
    As for gun ownership and the popularity of guns in the U.S.. Until the turn of the century only 7% of us lived in the cities. For the remainder a gun was an absolute necessity. We grew up with them in our homes. They weren't evil things that killed people. There were evil people that killed people and they usually used a gun but the gun was an innocent participant; just a thing. Most men learn to shoot from their fathers. It's a very entrenched tradition. A coming of age thing for a lot of males. It is a VERY big deal when you find your first Daisy BB gun under the Christmas tree,(I got mine at age 9), it means your a "big boy" now. Usually around 13-14yrs. of age, if your parents determine you have the sense God gave a goose, you get your first 22cal. rifle. I could go on but I hope you get the pic. Guns are for some a very big part of important turning points in our lives. Some people like guns because guns are fun. Target shooting is a blast. I could write a very long list of the reasons people enjoy gun ownership. From the reasons I have mentioned can you see why people feel threatened when told the gov. has as their goal a gun free society? What I've mentioned above are reasons people like guns; not reasons why we should be allowed to keep them. We don't need any justifications for gun ownership.
    I'm not actually opposed to all civilian gun ownership, but I do think it should be heavily licensed, just like you need a license to fly an aeroplane or drive a car, say.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I'm not actually opposed to all civilian gun ownership, but I do think it should be heavily licensed, just like you need a license to fly an aeroplane or drive a car, say.
    Your sure not alone in that opinion. However, I would never like to see gun registration mandatory. Again, let's not focus on the gun. I would rather see the potential gun buyer be required to show proof that he has completed whatever courses of gun safety that are required. Frankly, it's no ones business who or who does not own a gun; especially the Govts. Some collectors like my brother in San Diego, a former licensed gun dealer and current Gunsmith, have collections worth 10's of thousands of dollars and currently gun license information is public record and this makes him vulnerable to criminal theft. You may have heard that a number of months ago some anti-gun group acquired and PUBLISHED the names of gun owners in several areas in the Mid West region. Since the information is public record they were not prosecuted. It's difficult to not get overly defensive when faced with such tactics.:mad: I would welcome gun safety courses offered in Physical Education classes the same way archery classes are here in public schools with perhaps one year at least being mandatory.
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    Up until about a year ago I had no interest in going to America, but now I've decided I'd really like to see what it's like. I want to see how different the UK & US are and just see what it'd be like as an experience. I'd like to travel around though rather than just going to one part.
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    Just like to apologise for turning this thread into a political debate haha :-)
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    (Original post by Oldcon1953)
    Your sure not alone in that opinion. However, I would never like to see gun registration mandatory. Again, let's not focus on the gun. I would rather see the potential gun buyer be required to show proof that he has completed whatever courses of gun safety that are required. Frankly, it's no ones business who or who does not own a gun; especially the Govts. Some collectors like my brother in San Diego, a former licensed gun dealer and current Gunsmith, have collections worth 10's of thousands of dollars and currently gun license information is public record and this makes him vulnerable to criminal theft. You may have heard that a number of months ago some anti-gun group acquired and PUBLISHED the names of gun owners in several areas in the Mid West region. Since the information is public record they were not prosecuted. It's difficult to not get overly defensive when faced with such tactics.:mad: I would welcome gun safety courses offered in Physical Education classes the same way archery classes are here in public schools with perhaps one year at least being mandatory.
    Well as long as there is some way of making sure that if somebody has a gun, they are capable of using it properly and are sane enough not to harm people with it, that's all. Licensing would just be a means to that end, and I wasn't suggesting that it is the only way.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Well as long as there is some way of making sure that if somebody has a gun, they are capable of using it properly and are sane enough not to harm people with it, that's all. Licensing would just be a means to that end, and I wasn't suggesting that it is the only way.
    Agreed. Teaching someone to be a capable gun handler is fairly easy but discerning whether or not they're sane enough to own one is a bit more problematic; especially in the U.S. LOL
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    Just like to apologise for turning this thread into a political debate haha :-)
    I'm afraid I'm equally guilty. Oh the shame!!
 
 
 
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