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    (Original post by n00)
    No it isn't
    http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Schizop...es/Causes.aspx

    It triggers it...
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    (Original post by JG1233)
    Not the only, but surely its a fairly major one?
    :clap2:

    When we then consider the side effects and the possibility of becoming addicted to alcohol and cannabis compared, surely cannabis comes out on top once again?
    That's not a particularly solid argument though, especially considering that the side effects of alcohol are much better understood. And contrary to popular belief, there are negative side effects and you can become addicted. This is what the NHS has to say on risks:
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    It triggers it if somebody is already prone to it. Are you seriously suggesting that we should dismiss all of the pro-legislation points, because a a study which is non even inclusive may suggest it could trigger underlying schizophrenia? Your also suggesting because its illegal nobody smokes it, if someone with with under-lying schizophrenia was going to smoke it because it becomes legal, you think they all of a sudden wouldn't now just because its not?
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    (Original post by JG1233)
    It triggers it if somebody is already prone to it. Are you seriously suggesting that we should dismiss all of the pro-legislation points, because a a study which is non even inclusive may suggest it could trigger underlying schizophrenia? Your also suggesting because its illegal nobody smokes it, if someone with with under-lying schizophrenia was going to smoke it because it becomes legal, you think they all of a sudden wouldn't now just because its not?
    DUDE READ WHAT I SAID I SUPPORT LEGISLATION!

    Yes I do believe triggering means exactly that: If you are prone to it then it TRIGGERS it, it cannot just give you schizophrenia.

    Get your facts right before trying to make me look like an idiot :/
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    That's not a particularly solid argument though, especially considering that the side effects of alcohol are much better understood. And contrary to popular belief, there are negative side effects and you can become addicted.
    Sure you can become addicted, but its a mental addiction not a physical. You could become mentally addicted to almost anything, so i fail to see how that is a valid argument.

    Considering your points are a IMG i'll just answer them like this:

    1) That's true, however for a start paranoia would drop massively if it was legalized considering people wouldn't fear being caught, and what does it matter anyway?

    2) Driving high is already an offence, using that as a argument would be under the assumption nobody is smoking cannabis already and people would only potentially start driving if it was legalized. However 3 million people admit to smoking cannabis every year (probably more who keep it secret), we hear of plenty of drunk driving offences but very few to near none high driving offences, why is that?

    3) Cannabis has only recently been proven to have properties which help to fight cancer, and is legal is many places because of its recognized medical benefits. If it makes asthma worse, then don't smoke it if you have asthma?

    4) So can literally anything, whether it be going on a job or drinking a coffee. That point is just complete nonsense.

    5) Once again it could trigger under-lying mental problems, not create them like many have suggested, This once again seems to rely on people not smoking cannabis already, by legalizing it the support for those who have adverse reactions would just improve.

    6) "It is reported", not backed up by any hard evidence and surely a risk a person in a free society should be free to decide themselves anyway even if it was? The nanny state may as well start banning junk food etc. if they are going to regulate our own bodies to that extent.

    7) Don't smoke when pregnant, any good mother would know that. Considering tobacco is legal though that doesn't really form a argument.

    8) So basically they are just describing what feeling high is like to for most people? Sure if you've just smoked you will feel as they've described, but unless your always high there is once again no evidence to prove that claim.

    9) Well then legalize it? When buying from illegal dealers on the street people have no clue what they are getting, whether it is poor quality cannabis or extremely potent skunk. By legalizing it people can go to a shop and know 100% what they are buying, so then be prepared for the high.
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    Whilst many people could argue constructively in favour of its legalisation should the bigger priorities not be aspects like poverty?! Weed is a drug and its people's choice if they want to get involved with it and then it is their fault if it does harm them but why waste money and time on legalising weed when many people can't even afford to put food on the table- is that really fair?!
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    :clap2:


    That's not a particularly solid argument though, especially considering that the side effects of alcohol are much better understood. And contrary to popular belief, there are negative side effects and you can become addicted. This is what the NHS has to say on risks:
    Bah thats nothing, this is what Bupa has to say on the health risks associated with alcohol.

    Alcohol and cancer

    Drinking as little as three units of alcohol a day increases your risk of developing many types of cancer, including cancers of the mouth, throat, oesophagus (the pipe that goes from your mouth to your stomach), liver, breast and bowel.
    Key facts

    Evidence indicates that alcohol is linked to 12,500 cases of cancer in the UK each year.
    If you smoke and drink, you’re up to 50 times more likely to get some types of cancer than someone who never smokes or drinks alcohol.
    All types of alcoholic drinks increase the risk of cancer, even red wine. It’s the alcohol that causes damage, not the type of drink it’s in.

    Alcohol, the heart and circulation

    Regularly drinking too much alcohol damages your heart and increases your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Damage to your heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) can cause it to pump blood around your body less effectively. It can also lead to an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia).
    Key facts

    Men who regularly drink more than eight units of alcohol a day (double the recommended amount) nearly double their risk of coronary heart disease, are four times more likely to have high blood pressure and double their risk of stroke.
    Women who regularly drink more than six units of alcohol a day (double the recommended amount) are also slightly more likely to develop coronary heart disease, double their risk of high blood pressure and are four times more likely to have a stroke.

    Alcohol and your liver

    Alcohol damages your liver. Your liver is the largest organ in your body and one of its many functions is to filter and clean your blood. It takes about one hour for your liver to break down one unit of alcohol. If you regularly drink too much alcohol, you are at risk of developing a range of alcoholic liver diseases including fatty liver disease, hepatitis and alcohol-induced cirrhosis (fibrosis or scarring of your liver). If you cut down or stop drinking in the early stages of liver disease, your liver may recover. However, continuing to drink when your liver is damaged can lead to complete liver failure.
    Key facts

    One in three adults in the UK drinks enough alcohol to be at risk of developing alcohol-related liver disease.
    The process is silent, but when liver disease has developed, the symptoms come on suddenly and it can be life-threatening.
    In 2010, alcohol-related liver diseases were responsible for over six out of 10 alcohol-related deaths in the UK.
    If you have liver cirrhosis, you’re more likely to develop liver cancer.

    Alcohol and your pancreas

    Alcohol damages your pancreas. Your pancreas is an organ that lies behind your stomach and produces digestive enzymes which help to break down fatty food, as well as insulin, which helps control blood sugar. If you drink too much alcohol, it can lead to acute or chronic pancreatitis. With acute pancreatitis, your pancreas becomes inflamed over a short period of time. Chronic pancreatitis is when your pancreas continues to be inflamed over a long period of time, and the damage may be permanent.
    Key facts

    One in five people who have acute pancreatitis have a severe form and the condition causes 950 deaths every year in the UK.
    Around seven out of 10 people who have chronic pancreatitis are heavy drinkers who drink long-term.
    One in three people who have chronic pancreatitis will develop diabetes. This is because your damaged pancreas can no longer make insulin.

    Alcohol, sex and reproduction

    Regularly drinking more than the daily recommended amount is known to affect fertility in both men and women.
    Key facts

    In women, alcohol can disrupt menstrual cycles and ovulation which makes it harder to conceive.
    In men, alcohol can reduce testosterone levels and this can cause loss of sexual desire and affect sperm production. Alcohol also affects the nervous system, making it difficult for men to achieve or maintain an erection.

    Alcohol and your mental health

    Drinking heavily over a long time can severely affect your mental health. It can increase anxiety and cause depression. It’s also associated with risk-taking behaviour, personality disorders, schizophrenia and suicide.
    Key facts

    Alcohol alters the chemistry in your brain and increases your risk of depression.
    After a few weeks of cutting out alcohol, you’re likely to feel less depressed.

    Alcohol and your nervous system

    Regular heavy alcohol use can lead to nerve and brain damage, resulting in memory problems, dementia and damage to small nerve endings.
    Key facts

    Regular heavy alcohol use can cause a lack of vitamin B1 (thiamine) which can, if left untreated, lead to permanent memory loss.
    Some research has shown that heavy drinking over time may cause damage to your brain, which can cause problems with learning, thinking and problem solving. These effects may to some extent be reversible if you stop drinking.

    If you stick to the recommended guidelines (no more than three to four units a day for men and no more than two or three units a day for women a day), you’re less likely to have serious health problems in later life. For more information see sensible drinking.

    If you’re struggling to keep within your limits, don’t be afraid to talk to someone. Talking to a close friend, a support group or your GP can help you understand your drinking habits and find ways to cut down how much you drink.
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    (Original post by iamlucyclare)
    Whilst many people could argue constructively in favour of its legalisation should the bigger priorities not be aspects like poverty?! Weed is a drug and its people's choice if they want to get involved with it and then it is their fault if it does harm them but why waste money and time on legalising weed when many people can't even afford to put food on the table- is that really fair?!
    Because when legalized, the millions of potential tax revenue which would be gained from selling cannabis could then be put towards helping those who need it. This money can then be spent on hospitals, schools etc.

    Whilst its illegal, all the money goes directly into the underworld and hands of criminals which is silly when it could be used to help people who need it as you' mentioned.
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    (Original post by n00)
    Bah thats nothing, this is what Bupa has to say on the health risks associated with alcohol.
    What's that I read? We might be reading something different, but it looked to me like ti was saying about regularly exceeding (often significantly so) the recommended daily limit.
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    it should not be legalised.
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    no it stinks, im sick of walking around in town or even on my street and smelling it and its illegal!, if it was legal it would be worse
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    (Original post by heyoka)
    no it stinks, im sick of walking around in town or even on my street and smelling it and its illegal!, if it was legal it would be worse
    "No I don't like it, so nobody else can have it", next the middle aged virgins will weigh in and try to make sex illegal

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    "Even hardcore smokers can become anxious, panicky, suspicious or paranoid."

    Isn't that part of the fun?
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    (Original post by heyoka)
    no it stinks, im sick of walking around in town or even on my street and smelling it and its illegal!, if it was legal it would be worse
    I don't like the smell of Apollo Lynx, lets ban that as well!
    And coffee, i hate the smell of that especially when going past a Starbucks, lets ban that whilst we are at it.
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    (Original post by ali_blue)
    I'm not trying to appear all hippy stoner here and talk about how weed is gonna save the world- I'm only 17 lol.
    As someone that occasionally smokes weed, anywhere between several joints a day to several months without it, it's not had a detrimental effect on anything in my life. I still get good grades and I've not experienced any bad side effects, so why should I be labeled a stoner? It's not like anybody who has a drink is labelled an alcoholic, so what's all the bad press about with weed?
    The money that we make as an economy from putting a seriously high tax on weed and then selling it would be amazing, it could go towards the nhs or cancer research. Crime would be reduced as well.
    Ok I'll stop ranting now, basically I want to hear your thoughts, and do you smoke weed yourself?
    I don't smoke weed myself anymore because I simply grew out of it. I'm 19 now and only really did it when I was 16-17?

    It should be legalised though, legalised but controlled.
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    (Original post by DErasmus)
    Drugs are not as frequent as alcohol or smoking, i'd say that's a success. Has the war on murder been lost because sometimes people are murdered? Should we just legalise it and tax it.
    Okay now you're just being deliberately facetious and ignorant and as such I cannot take you seriously.
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    (Original post by JG1233)
    I don't like the smell of Apollo Lynx, lets ban that as well!
    And coffee, i hate the smell of that especially when going past a Starbucks, lets ban that whilst we are at it.
    Not even remotely comparable, one can remove themselves from Starbucks, legalising drugs would mean they would be everywhere.

    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Okay now you're just being deliberately facetious and ignorant and as such I cannot take you seriously.

    - loses argument
    - accusations of ignorance

    liberal hegemony, you are good sophists but reality does not change as well as your justifications do, the legalisation of drugs will play out in my favour despite such arguments.
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    (Original post by DErasmus)
    Not even remotely comparable, one can remove themselves from Starbucks, legalising drugs would mean they would be everywhere.
    In basically all countries cannabis has been legalized, it is still illegal to smoke it outdoors. As a result it would be limited to coffee shops, and so your own argument goes back to you, remove yourself from the coffee shop.

    (Original post by DErasmus)
    - loses argument
    - accusations of ignorance

    liberal hegemony, you are good sophists but reality does not change as well as your justifications do, the legalisation of drugs will play out in my favour despite such arguments.
    I didn't think your arguments were based on pretty much anything but ignorance? And i really fail to see how she lost, considering almost everyone on this thread has disagreed with you.
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    (Original post by DErasmus)
    Not even remotely comparable, one can remove themselves from Starbucks, legalising drugs would mean they would be everywhere.




    - loses argument
    - accusations of ignorance

    liberal hegemony, you are good sophists but reality does not change as well as your justifications do, the legalisation of drugs will play out in my favour despite such arguments.
    I have lost no such thing and you are ignorant, you have ignored all the valid points everyone has made on this thread, you have made rash judgements about all drug users and you equated drugs to murder which is complete a fallacy.
    If you want to redeem yourself and claw back some sense of looking remotely intelligent please put forward an argument as to why you think drugs (if particular drugs or all drugs) should remain illegal in a proper manner.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I have lost no such thing and you are ignorant, you have ignored all the valid points everyone has made on this thread, you have made rash judgements about all drug users and you equated drugs to murder which is complete a fallacy.
    If you want to redeem yourself and claw back some sense of looking remotely intelligent please put forward an argument as to why you think drugs (if particular drugs or all drugs) should remain illegal in a proper manner.
    As I have already said your sophistry might look good but once drugs are legalised the negative effects will be out there for all to see. I don't really care for putting forward arguments since they're inferior to reality (whether or not i can justify gravity is irrelevant to the outcome, not to mention they are inferior in that they're simply manipulated justifications for rash behaviour).
 
 
 
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