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Should teachers be banned from striking? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should teachers be banned from striking?
    Yes
    65
    28.02%
    No
    167
    71.98%

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    I think that, very simply, if police and the armed forces are not allowed to strike, then if we value education as much as we do national defence and policing (which we should, on the balance of things), teachers should not be allowed to strike.
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    I voted yes when I meant to vote no
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    Would be cool if the government stopped giving money away to other countries and payed the teachers and doctors here more though.
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    (Original post by n00)
    No, some do. Did you read it?
    Right...
    So no change in the last couple of decades...
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    (Original post by TSA)
    Yes they are saints. :rolleyes:

    When exactly did I imply they are saints again?

    Everybody is greedy. Everybody works in their own self interest. Welcome to reality.
    I'm glad we're in agreement then. Have some sympathy, the amount of absurd right-wing claims that public sector workers are greedy and the top echelons are not that I've read on here is absurd. After awhile it all blends into one.
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    No, they shouldn't be allowed to strike and btw, only 43% of teachers in that union voted for the strike in the first ballot and a fewer number voted for it in the second ballot. Not sure how much those %'s are relative to the number of people that voted though.
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    Ban teachers from striking? What if they striked against that action?
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    Christ no, its a fundamental part of an economy that trade unions can exert wage pressure, otherwise teachers might just be earning next to nothing - which might mean state education standards would be even lower. Also, one of my lecturers pointed this out a while ago (he is not a member of any union as he disagrees with the frequency with which they strike), it's worrying when parents complain about having to make arrangements to look after their kids - as if education is simply a form of free day care for their children. What they should be worrying about, he rightly pointed out, is the lost learning time.
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    Some of these comments make me sad. I don't want to live in a world where we oppress a person's right to strike or speak out. Striking for a higher wage is only part of it, it's also to speak out against what the government is doing to the education system. Striking isn't just for the teachers, but for the pupils too.

    Some of you need to do your research before you throw around narrow minded opinions :unimpressed:
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    No, they need a volume to be able to express their disapproval over a decision that would affect their livelihoods...
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    Bear with me on this one:
    Firstly, strikes are occurring for many reasons aside from teachers own welfare, such as: working conditions, the curriculum and general welfare of students. It is a shame news organisations seem to be incapable of reporting more of the truth - even the BBC is chasing the sensationalist line.
    Public servants are not after higher wages. Inflation means real wages are decreasing every year. Therefore the desire is for a wage that increases with inflation. Furthermore the government has increased pension contributions from workers in the public sector to get less at the end, that is not paid until later (usually late 60's). If I was facing these conditions (lower pay, degraded pension and later retirement) there would be no question about my commitment to a strike! Don't forget the public sector can be exploited just as private sector can be.

    As for the so called "detrimental effects on education." I propose that there are far greater risks from not attracting graduates who are enthusiastic about teaching to the profession, and losing teachers who have become dissatisfied with the job. This is a real issue for the Office for Education already.

    My parents are both public sector workers, though not in teaching - so clearly I could be called bias in my views. However I do know that a public sector career is far from the media stereotype that many on this forum seem to have described. Perhaps we should learn not to see everything so black and white: 'allowed to strike or not allowed to strike.' I am surprised how many do not appreciate the rights of people in this country, and seem to have narrowed their sources of information to 'The Sun' and other such sensationalist press
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    The National Union of Teachers are among many public sector workers going out on strike this week.

    On Question Time on Thursday, the Tory MP on the panel mused about the possibility of teachers being banned from strike action, like the police and the army.

    Which begs the question, if the police and the army aren't allowed to strike, then why are teachers allowed to - given the huge disruption working parents face when a school is closed.

    If the Tories win in 2015, you're likely to see tougher rules on ballots, but I wouldn't rule them out going a step further.

    I don't believe strike action is a particularly effective form of protest in the 21st century, anyway. With the internet, there are plenty of ways to affect the decision-making of the establishment without hurting and disaffecting the very people you're meant to care about... the students.

    What do we all think?
    When a government starts playing around with the right to strike, the everyday man and woman in this country needs to be really worried. It's one of the few things that stem the tide of the rich bosses getting richer and the poor workers getting poorer.
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    No I don't think that teachers should strike. My son has got tomorrow off school even though his school is open as his teacher is one of only two in the school that has decided to strike. As a parent it's frustrating knowing that my son is one of the very few in the school who can not attend tomorrow, as school's cannot use supply teachers to cover industrial action. It's even more annoying as this comes just over a week before his teacher has a six weeks paid holiday at the tax payer's expense.
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    (Original post by emsa86)
    It's even more annoying as this comes just over a week before his teacher has a six weeks paid holiday at the tax payer's expense.
    Teacher's don't get payed for the summer holidays. Their pay for the year is simply divided equally so any pay they receive is for work they have already done that year.
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    Teachers should strike on the weekends, is all I've got to say.
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    The thing that frustrates me about people's reactions to strikes is that it's always reduced to money - "Why should they get more money?!"

    People rarely seem to stop and think that these people, working within these jobs/industries, may actually have another reason based on them being able to do a good job, for striking. People would be quick to complain when their child misses out on something in their education because their teacher was too busy completing excessive paperwork, preparing for OfSTED, ticking boxes that have to be ticked or they will lose their job. I think that if they see the full extent of this many parents would find it ludicrous; most care only that their child is happy and cared for and learns/progresses well in school. It's not just about money, it's about the bigger picture.

    Similar things happen in all industries - on the railway for example. If there was a train crash because staff had been cut and something went wrong there would be public uproar, yet when people try to strike about staff cuts they are told they are greedy, and everyone complains because they can't get their train that day...

    I will note that I don't express any opinion on whether striking is actually the best way to achieve the desired outcomes. I personally have never struck (weird to say it that way!), my union has never chosen to - they generally favour other methods but have joined strikes in the past. But certainly I don't think strikes should be banned. I find it ludicrous that people advocate getting rid of the freedom to fight against issues (even if they believe there currently aren't any such issues worth striking for, there may be in the future) purely to avoid an inconvenience to them.

    xxx
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    No, I'd rather study at home or at the library than at school.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)

    I will note that I don't express any opinion on whether striking is actually the best way to achieve the desired outcomes. I personally have never struck (weird to say it that way!), my union has never chosen to - they generally favour other methods but have joined strikes in the past. But certainly I don't think strikes should be banned. I find it ludicrous that people advocate getting rid of the freedom to fight against issues (even if they believe there currently aren't any such issues worth striking for, there may be in the future) purely to avoid an inconvenience to them.

    xxx
    The teachers involved have actually tried other mediums of expressing their concern before it escalated to striking. The government are simply not open to discussions about the decisions they are making that affect the jobs and lives of these teachers (and other public sector workers who are being effected). They are left with no option but striking because it is the only way they can make their voices heard.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    The thing that frustrates me about people's reactions to strikes is that it's always reduced to money - "Why should they get more money?!"

    People rarely seem to stop and think that these people, working within these jobs/industries, may actually have another reason based on them being able to do a good job, for striking. People would be quick to complain when their child misses out on something in their education because their teacher was too busy completing excessive paperwork, preparing for OfSTED, ticking boxes that have to be ticked or they will lose their job. I think that if they see the full extent of this many parents would find it ludicrous; most care only that their child is happy and cared for and learns/progresses well in school. It's not just about money, it's about the bigger picture.

    Similar things happen in all industries - on the railway for example. If there was a train crash because staff had been cut and something went wrong there would be public uproar, yet when people try to strike about staff cuts they are told they are greedy, and everyone complains because they can't get their train that day...

    I will note that I don't express any opinion on whether striking is actually the best way to achieve the desired outcomes. I personally have never struck (weird to say it that way!), my union has never chosen to - they generally favour other methods but have joined strikes in the past. But certainly I don't think strikes should be banned. I find it ludicrous that people advocate getting rid of the freedom to fight against issues (even if they believe there currently aren't any such issues worth striking for, there may be in the future) purely to avoid an inconvenience to them.

    xxx
    Soon we'll outsource the teaching profession to private contractors to make it more efficient. To be honest with the state that the education system will be in in 10-15 years there'll be a reasonable case to replace them with droids.
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    (Original post by ChelseaYvonne)
    The teachers involved have actually tried other mediums of expressing their concern before it escalated to striking. The government are simply not open to discussions about the decisions they are making that affect the jobs and lives of these teachers (and other public sector workers who are being effected). They are left with no option but striking because it is the only way they can make their voices heard...
    And remain ignored regardless?
 
 
 
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