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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    As promised, here is the fourth instalment of my 'Ask an Admissions Tutor' threads. If you went to the Cambridge University Open Days last week and forgot to ask a crucial question or if you weren't able to go but have questions you would like to ask, or, indeed, if you just have questions about Cambridge Admissions, please ask it here and I will answer as soon as I can. This thread will run for three weeks and then a further thread will run after the A Level and AS Level results come out.
    For international students applying for medicine, what is the criteria for shortlisting applicants? [three best UMS, IGCSEs, predicted grades, BMAT, personal statement, reference, SAQ, etc)

    After interview stage, which criteria again do you use to select candidates to give offer? [ interview performance, UMS, BMAT, etc?]

    Do you have anything recommend for medicine applicants to do over the summer in order to strengthen the application?
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    As promised, here is the fourth instalment of my 'Ask an Admissions Tutor' threads. If you went to the Cambridge University Open Days last week and forgot to ask a crucial question or if you weren't able to go but have questions you would like to ask, or, indeed, if you just have questions about Cambridge Admissions, please ask it here and I will answer as soon as I can. This thread will run for three weeks and then a further thread will run after the A Level and AS Level results come out.
    How many people in the last couple of years have you accepted onto the Mathematics course having missed their STEP offer?
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    Dear Sir, Madam,

    What a great opportunity to ask a question that can help with a life changing decision.

    I am an international student with a degree in a social science with strong links to philosophy, history and history of art.

    I intend to pursue an MA in History of Art. A few late applications later, I find myself in a crossroad. I live in Essex and I got accepted into Essex University MA in History and Theory of Art. I do have other offers but I rather not relocate at the moment.

    My question is: Would a first class Ma in History of Art from Essex University be considered competitive and acceptable to pursue a PHD at your institution?

    Kind Regards
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    Hello!

    Thank you for offering us the opportunity to ask questions, it is very much appreciated

    In January I received an offer to study ASNaC at Cambridge, and have confirmed my place. However, over the past few months I've been having some doubt about my course, and wondering if I made the right decision after all; I applied for English at all my other choices, and now I feel like I should have applied for English at Cambridge as well, as that would be a better preparation for the career path I want to pursue.

    I'm still keen to start my course, and while I think there's a big chance I'll regain my enthusiasm once I've started, I'm a bit concerned about what happens if I don't. I want to give the course a shot for at least one year, but what happens if I still feel like English would be a better fit at the end of that? I'm a bit concerned my DoS might think I only applied for ASNaC because it's supposedly easier to get in, but that's not true at all; I genuinely thought ASNaC was the right fit for me, and I still find the course very interesting, but my career goals and interests have slightly changed.

    Is it possible to change courses after just one year instead of after part I? And if I would get permission to change courses, would it be possible for me to 'redo' the first year in English?

    Thank you very much in advance!
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    If you performed well at GCSE but wasnt all A*'s and so on, and managed to get 4 A's at AS and 2/3 A*'s and an A at A2, would you still be in with a chance? The GCSE A*'s you did get would be in the relevant subjects to your course.
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    (Original post by whitedove100)
    Hi there

    I'm seeking advice about whether or not I should reapply to Cambridge this autumn. I applied last year to Jesus College for Philosophy. I had straight A*s at GCSE- I was pooled after interview but sadly didn't manage an offer. I was absolutely gutted :'( In the following months, i was diagnosed with several mental health issues that meant my studies were quite disrupted and I really struggled to regain my focus. Though the mental health issues were not due to my rejection from Cambridge- I definitely lost faith in my ability and lost the drive to succeed. I firmed my offer for 38 points at IB from UCL and insured my Durham offer at 36. This week i recieved my IB results and by some ridiculous twist of fate, I came out with 44 points- my subjects were HL Philosophy, History and English and SL Maths, Latin and Biology. Given how far above my UCL offer this is, I feel it would be a shame not to reapply, as I've always had my heart so set on Cambridge.
    Is this a good idea? What is the general consensus on reapplication?
    Other things i'm considering is whether i ought to try Oxford this time round. Secondly whether or not I should apply for Law not Philosophy- as this was always a second choice of subject. Lastly, is there any advice regarding choosing a college? Is there such a thing has being tactical?

    Plleeeeeeeease reply! Any information greatly appreciated
    Thank you so much xx
    Lots of people are successful with reapplications so do not let that put you off. With 44 points achieved in the IB you will be a very strong applicant if you decide to reapply as the Cambridge offer is 40-42 points in the IB.

    There are a couple of important things you need to think about. First, is that you have a good offer from UCL already and are you sure you want to give that up for another go at Cambridge or at Oxford. Though you will be a strong candidate, there is no guarantee that you will be accepted. You should receive plenty of offers from your other choices though.

    Secondly, you need to think very carefully about which course to apply for. You say you 'had my heart set on Cambridge' but you don't apply to 'Cambridge', you apply to read a particular degree at Cambridge. You say that Philosophy was a second choice. You should always apply for the subject you really want to do regardless of how 'hard' it is supposed to be to get in for it, because you will a) have a better chance of getting in if it is a subject you really want to do and b) you will enjoy your time at Cambridge so much more. If Law is the subject you really want to do, then you should apply for Law.

    Regarding colllege choice, the advice is the same. Apply to the college you want to go to rather than trying to be tactical. Because of the pool system, you may end up at another college and I am sure will be happy there but if you decide you like a particular college then apply there - your chances of getting into Cambridge will not be affected by which college you choose.

    Good luck with whatever you decide. if I can be of more help, do ask away.
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    (Original post by JackTeh96)
    For international students applying for medicine, what is the criteria for shortlisting applicants? [three best UMS, IGCSEs, predicted grades, BMAT, personal statement, reference, SAQ, etc)

    After interview stage, which criteria again do you use to select candidates to give offer? [ interview performance, UMS, BMAT, etc?]

    Do you have anything recommend for medicine applicants to do over the summer in order to strengthen the application?
    Thanks!
    When choosing who to call for interview for medicine, the things we look at most closely are UMS (for those that have them) and the BMAT but we look at everything before making the decision. Similarly with deciding to whom we are going to make offers, we look at everything and judge each candidate individually and against the rest of the cohort.

    You will need to have done some work experience, so if you haven't done any yet then get some over the summer and reflect upon what you learn from the xerpeince, don't just see it as a box to have ticked. Beyond that, read as much as you can and keep abreast of developments in medicine as much as possible.
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    (Original post by CD315)
    How many people in the last couple of years have you accepted onto the Mathematics course having missed their STEP offer?
    I don't have numbers for the university and the numbers involved are too small at Christ's for me to put it in a public forum. Sufficed to say that if offer holders miss their STEP grades there is a reasonable chance they will still get an offer fromC ambridge, either from their offering college or from another in the Summer Pool. Many candidates with S,2 or 1,2 and sometimes 2,2 if they are close to the 1 grade boundary end up at Cambridge. The DoS receives not just the grade and mark but the script so he/she can make judgements on the basis of that, which can be very helpful.
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    (Original post by Gabrielagarcia)
    Dear Sir, Madam,

    What a great opportunity to ask a question that can help with a life changing decision.

    I am an international student with a degree in a social science with strong links to philosophy, history and history of art.

    I intend to pursue an MA in History of Art. A few late applications later, I find myself in a crossroad. I live in Essex and I got accepted into Essex University MA in History and Theory of Art. I do have other offers but I rather not relocate at the moment.

    My question is: Would a first class Ma in History of Art from Essex University be considered competitive and acceptable to pursue a PHD at your institution?

    Kind Regards
    Yes, it would be considered competitive.
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    (Original post by Improbable One)
    Hello!

    Thank you for offering us the opportunity to ask questions, it is very much appreciated

    In January I received an offer to study ASNaC at Cambridge, and have confirmed my place. However, over the past few months I've been having some doubt about my course, and wondering if I made the right decision after all; I applied for English at all my other choices, and now I feel like I should have applied for English at Cambridge as well, as that would be a better preparation for the career path I want to pursue.

    I'm still keen to start my course, and while I think there's a big chance I'll regain my enthusiasm once I've started, I'm a bit concerned about what happens if I don't. I want to give the course a shot for at least one year, but what happens if I still feel like English would be a better fit at the end of that? I'm a bit concerned my DoS might think I only applied for ASNaC because it's supposedly easier to get in, but that's not true at all; I genuinely thought ASNaC was the right fit for me, and I still find the course very interesting, but my career goals and interests have slightly changed.

    Is it possible to change courses after just one year instead of after part I? And if I would get permission to change courses, would it be possible for me to 'redo' the first year in English?

    Thank you very much in advance!
    First of all, congratulations on your offer. As you say, you may well find your enthusiasm sparked again once you start the course - ASNC is a terrific course and, because of the small number of students doing it, has an excellent supportive atmosphere about it.

    If you decided you wished to change then it would be possible providing both your ASNC DoS and your English DoS agreed. This can happen at any time, though it usually be at the end of Part I. Were you to swtich at the end of the first year, you would probably need to re-do the first year in English and so would have four years at Cambridge.
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    (Original post by JayJay-C19)
    If you performed well at GCSE but wasnt all A*'s and so on, and managed to get 4 A's at AS and 2/3 A*'s and an A at A2, would you still be in with a chance? The GCSE A*'s you did get would be in the relevant subjects to your course.
    Yes, you would still be in with a chance. The better you would have done at AS Level, the better your chances, especially if your GCSEs are not as strong as you might like.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Yes, you would still be in with a chance. The better you would have done at AS Level, the better your chances, especially if your GCSEs are not as strong as you might like.
    Thank you for the reassurance.

    I would like to apply for either History or Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic - what sorts of things are asked at interview for these subjects and what do the tests normally entail?

    My friend also asked:

    "I took Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and German at AS Level. Will I be disadvantaged when applying for Medicine without Biology?"
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    Hi there,

    Thank you for creating this thread and answering all of our questions.

    I'd like to apply as a mature student to read Classics. I've been living abroad since the very end of Year 9, leaving the UK with a single GCSE (an "A" in Portuguese) and finishing my high school education in Brazil. I passed university entrance exams here and have now completed one year's study at a prestigious law school here. My average grade over two semesters is 86.6 (eleven units all scored 86 and higher except for one unfortunate grade of 62, due to a missed exam). Classics are and always have been my passion (I had chosen Latin as one of my elective GCSEs) but as they are not on offer here, I went for Law instead.

    I have two questions:
    - Would the fact that I've done a year of Law school testify against me, as being not passionate or dedicated enough for Classics?
    - Would Christ's consider the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio (High School Completion Certificate, equivalent to year 11), a pass at the vestibular (university entrance exams) and a year towards a Bachelor's degree in Law (with high grades in 80s and 90s) sufficient, or would you prefer I do a foundation/access/certificate first?

    Thank you for your time.
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    (Original post by JayJay-C19)
    Thank you for the reassurance.

    I would like to apply for either History or Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic - what sorts of things are asked at interview for these subjects and what do the tests normally entail?

    My friend also asked:

    "I took Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and German at AS Level. Will I be disadvantaged when applying for Medicine without Biology?"
    In both History and ASNC, one of the interviews will very likely focus on the submittesd work you sent us, while the other is likely to focus around a historical source that you would have the opportunity to read before. Colleges that do separate tests in History usually will ask some general questions that allow you to use your own knowledge in answering them.

    Your friend will be at a disadvantage having not done Biology at A Level for Medicine as the vast majority of students will have done Biology. It is not essential to have done Biology but not doing it does but one behind others in terms of knowledge. if it is possible for him/her to take AS Biology in year 13, I would encourage that. Alternatively, they should read as much biology as possible before they apply.
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    (Original post by Velasco)
    Hi there,

    Thank you for creating this thread and answering all of our questions.

    I'd like to apply as a mature student to read Classics. I've been living abroad since the very end of Year 9, leaving the UK with a single GCSE (an "A" in Portuguese) and finishing my high school education in Brazil. I passed university entrance exams here and have now completed one year's study at a prestigious law school here. My average grade over two semesters is 86.6 (eleven units all scored 86 and higher except for one unfortunate grade of 62, due to a missed exam). Classics are and always have been my passion (I had chosen Latin as one of my elective GCSEs) but as they are not on offer here, I went for Law instead.

    I have two questions:
    - Would the fact that I've done a year of Law school testify against me, as being not passionate or dedicated enough for Classics?
    - Would Christ's consider the Certificado de Conclusão de Ensino Médio (High School Completion Certificate, equivalent to year 11), a pass at the vestibular (university entrance exams) and a year towards a Bachelor's degree in Law (with high grades in 80s and 90s) sufficient, or would you prefer I do a foundation/access/certificate first?

    Thank you for your time.
    1.) No, that would be fine, though I expect we would like to see evidence of your interest in Classics both in your PS and interview and ability in Latin assuming you apply for the three-year Classics course.

    2) Yes, but we would need a transcript from both your High School and University.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    1.) No, that would be fine, though I expect we would like to see evidence of your interest in Classics both in your PS and interview and ability in Latin assuming you apply for the three-year Classics course.

    2) Yes, but we would need a transcript from both your High School and University.
    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    1) As I have no official qualifications in Latin (other than high grades throughout Year 7,8 and 9, which I can prove), what would best serve as tangible evidence?

    2) Would I also need someone at my current university to recommend me? Unsure how this would work as it's a Portuguese-speaking institution, unsure whether recommendations would have to be translated etc.

    3) How does progression from undergraduate to master's work, in terms of subject matter? If I do my undergraduate in Classics, could I then do a master's in, say, English, or Roman Law in medieval England, etc etc?
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    (Original post by Velasco)
    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    1) As I have no official qualifications in Latin (other than high grades throughout Year 7,8 and 9, which I can prove), what would best serve as tangible evidence?

    2) Would I also need someone at my current university to recommend me? Unsure how this would work as it's a Portuguese-speaking institution, unsure whether recommendations would have to be translated etc.

    3) How does progression from undergraduate to master's work, in terms of subject matter? If I do my undergraduate in Classics, could I then do a master's in, say, English, or Roman Law in medieval England, etc etc?
    1) Assuming you have kept up your Latin since Year 9, you would need to explain how in the personal statement or SAQ form. One of the interviews will involve some Latin translation where we can put your abilities to the test. Alterntaively, you could apply for the four year course where you do not need Latin or Greek to start.

    2) Yes and you would need to get it translated.

    3) It varies from subject to subject and would depend on what you specialised in towards the end of your undergraduate. if you ended up focusding more on literature, for instance, then a Master's in English would be possible.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi there, you should be a strong candidate for either graduate or affiliated study with a first class degree. If you apply for the undergraduate affiliated course you may wish to apply to one of the mature colleges (Wolfson or Hughes Hall). If you apply for a graduate course then Magdalene College has three Mandela scholarships which may be of interest to you, though I am not sure whether ASNC would fall under a subject 'relevant to the needs of South Africa' as stipulated in the particulars. Alternatively the Cambridge Trust has funding for Commonwealth students.
    Thank you very much for your advice.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    When choosing who to call for interview for medicine, the things we look at most closely are UMS (for those that have them) and the BMAT but we look at everything before making the decision. Similarly with deciding to whom we are going to make offers, we look at everything and judge each candidate individually and against the rest of the cohort.

    You will need to have done some work experience, so if you haven't done any yet then get some over the summer and reflect upon what you learn from the xerpeince, don't just see it as a box to have ticked. Beyond that, read as much as you can and keep abreast of developments in medicine as much as possible.
    Thanks, One more question: What is the average standard of the international medical applicants that were shortlisted and given offers in terms of AS UMS average, BMAT score and interview score?
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    (Original post by JackTeh96)
    Thanks, One more question: What is the average standard of the international medical applicants that were shortlisted and given offers in terms of AS UMS average, BMAT score and interview score?
    I don;t have enough data on international students for medicine who are doing A Levels as most are doing other qualifications. The average successful entrant at Christ's over the last three years for medicine had 95.77% average in their Sciences but that is just an average. For the BMAT it is 6.01 for Section I and 6.34 for Section II.
 
 
 
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