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A shocking experience with dentistry/medicine students!! Watch

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    (Original post by ando181)
    They genuinely considered all these other degrees 'below' them, I really hope I dont turn into one of these guys because Im really considering medicine/dentistry
    There are some people on my course who are like this, but I honestly think it's about their background. Those who were d***s before university are going to be like that while at university. I know some medics who think other medics who didn't go to private school are 'below' them :s. It's very petty and stupid. So please ignore the minority! Different courses involve different skills...I wouldn't be able to do a maths/physics degree!!

    (Original post by PsychadelicScarf)
    Yes. Lets all have doctors who get so emotionally attached to their patients they can't treat them properly. A surgeon who is sobbing during an operation. An oncologist who can't draw blood from a child because it brakes their heart to see them screaming so much, when it might find out if they're dying.

    Doctors are better when they are emotionally distant. They can see the case objectively, and act accordingly.
    A doctor who lets their emotions decide their method of treatment, is going to end up at the bottom of a bottle if things go bits up.
    Obviously your examples are extreme, but we actually get marks in our OSCE for 'relationship with patient'. Empathy and actually caring is vital in any healthcare profession (yes, even doctors!).
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    (Original post by nam92)
    There are some people on my course who are like this, but I honestly think it's about their background. Those who were d***s before university are going to be like that while at university. I know some medics who think other medics who didn't go to private school are 'below' them :s. It's very petty and stupid. So please ignore the minority! Different courses involve different skills...I wouldn't be able to do a maths/physics degree!!



    Obviously your examples are extreme, but we actually get marks in our OSCE for 'relationship with patient'. Empathy and actually caring is vital in any healthcare profession (yes, even doctors!).
    Sure, the patient needs to know they can trust their doctor. But it basically boils down to; would you rather have a shoulder to cry on, or actually get some help?
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    (Original post by nam92)
    There are some people on my course who are like this, but I honestly think it's about their background. Those who were d***s before university are going to be like that while at university. I know some medics who think other medics who didn't go to private school are 'below' them :s. It's very petty and stupid. So please ignore the minority! Different courses involve different skills...I wouldn't be able to do a maths/physics degree!!
    Lmfao, I would argue its the other way around. I'd love to have a medic or dentist say that to me or think that way about me.
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    (Original post by PsychadelicScarf)
    Sure, the patient needs to know they can trust their doctor. But it basically boils down to; would you rather have a shoulder to cry on, or actually get some help?
    You know doctors can be caring and know their stuff?! Now that's what makes a great doctor! One who can manage your diabetes/fix your broken neck of femur, asks about your home situation and checks whether you'll be able to cope after discharge.
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    (Original post by teen1234)
    Lmfao, I would argue its the other way around. I'd love to have a medic or dentist say that to me or think that way about me.
    Somebody once told me my mum didn't love me enough as she didn't send me to private school. It was not 'banter' :/

    But, that is seriously a minority of medics!! The majority of my close friends went to private schools and they are absolutely lovely.
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    (Original post by nam92)
    You know doctors can be caring and know their stuff?! Now that's what makes a great doctor! One who can manage your diabetes/fix your broken neck of femur, asks about your home situation and checks whether you'll be able to cope after discharge.
    It's not knowing their stuffs that's the problem. It's getting too emotionally involved, then having to choose the medically right decision, then having to take a step back. That's why I think doctors who are more emotionally detached are better.
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    (Original post by nohomo)
    Joke's on them anyway. If they're anything like my parents (doctors), they'll work themselves to the bone and get caught up in the rat race, envying people who earn more than them and even people who get less (people in less stressful jobs and benefit claimants) never having much fun, then retire at 60 with all their youth gone and die.

    Obviously the lot of many people isn't much better, and they retire at 67 now. But of all the lives you could choose, there are many that are better and more attainable than that of a doctor (though obviously for some people, perhaps being a doctor is the thing for them)

    Their lives aren't that great. There are over 100,000 doctors in the UK, and at least 90,000 don't really stand out.
    Agreed! You become 1 of many and you can easily become despondent and cynical when you're no longer the cleverest in your class etc etc

    Those who survive it love their job and that prestige and respect crap stops meaning very much after a short while. I'm dreading the snobbish ***** on my course, there's gonna be one at least I'm pretty sure of it.
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    (Original post by PsychadelicScarf)
    Sure, the patient needs to know they can trust their doctor. But it basically boils down to; would you rather have a shoulder to cry on, or actually get some help?
    I think you should be able to get both, doctors are judged on their bedside manner. And a doctor can be both emotionally unattached and be able to give this kind of support.
    There's a difference between being emotionally unattached and being completely unavailable, arrogant and putting a patient in a position were they feel scared and with no support obviously with the former being preferable and the latter being a doctor I never want to have to see.
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    (Original post by PsychadelicScarf)
    It's not knowing their stuffs that's the problem. It's getting too emotionally involved, then having to choose the medically right decision, then having to take a step back. That's why I think doctors who are more emotionally detached are better.
    I understand what you're saying it's about finding the right balance. It can happen, but I've not seen it.
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    (Original post by Lamptastic)
    Agreed! You become 1 of many and you can easily become despondent and cynical when you're no longer the cleverest in your class etc etc

    Those who survive it love their job and that prestige and respect crap stops meaning very much after a short while. I'm dreading the snobbish ***** on my course, there's gonna be one at least I'm pretty sure of it.
    This is the thing which Im both most looking forward to and most dreading. When you're at school or out of school and you tell someone you're studying dentistry they assume you're smart, in uni you might be the dumbest person in your class yet you're still considered smart. Its a relativity thing.
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    (Original post by teen1234)
    This is the thing which Im both most looking forward to and most dreading. When you're at school or out of school and you tell someone you're studying dentistry they assume you're smart, in uni you might be the dumbest person in your class yet you're still considered smart. Its a relativity thing.
    Medics are quite competitive I've heard, at least at the beginning. That's going to be weird as I've had 5 years post undergrad degree working in a crap job and I'm really chilled out about everything. I'm just hoping I keep up.
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    (Original post by PsychadelicScarf)
    It's not knowing their stuffs that's the problem. It's getting too emotionally involved, then having to choose the medically right decision, then having to take a step back. That's why I think doctors who are more emotionally detached are better.
    You think people are incapable of doing what needs done if they have emotions?

    Detachment is not ideal. This isn't house on tv.
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    (Original post by Lamptastic)
    Medics are quite competitive I've heard, at least at the beginning. That's going to be weird as I've had 5 years post undergrad degree working in a crap job and I'm really chilled out about everything. I'm just hoping I keep up.
    You can trump anything they have to say with 'OK cya I'm going home to my Kitty's now!'
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    (Original post by Lamptastic)
    Medics are quite competitive I've heard, at least at the beginning. That's going to be weird as I've had 5 years post undergrad degree working in a crap job and I'm really chilled out about everything. I'm just hoping I keep up.
    Not too surprising, ~10 applicants per place for medicine/dentistry at undergrad. Also, being at the top of class will help you in going into specialities and getting the best foundation places, at least for dentistry
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    (Original post by nam92)

    Obviously your examples are extreme, but we actually get marks in our OSCE for 'relationship with patient'. Empathy and actually caring is vital in any healthcare profession (yes, even doctors!).
    The examples were retarded, not to mention the fact the doctors 'brake' their hearts. It's like assuming a sniper or military commmander has to be a sociopath and decrying PTSD as stupid. You need empathy to be good at both taking and saving lives.
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    Bless their cotton socks. You'll find that people who genuinely think they're superior because of the subject they're studying (never mind those who haven't even started yet) tend to not be very bright comparatively and rather boring as individuals - just keep that in mind. It's also worth pointing out that it's far more common to meet an offer holder or applicant like this than a current student, once they start the degree and the s**t hits the fan they'll feel less superior and realise they're not really that special little person they thought they were :lol:
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    (Original post by sbj)
    If you meet those kind of students, just tell them you study maths. It works perfect. Because they are below Mathematicians/Physicist by far and they know it.

    I see you are equally stuck up, then.
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    (Original post by Acidy)
    Yep I understand. But if you wished to practice as a barrister, as an example, the grind for work experience at A level is nothing in comparison to say the amount of pupillage's you require to gain a contract, that's even before you face the competition. This is what frustrates me.
    Yeah but thatsis after uni, so you cant compare us with them.

    I know becaoming a barrister is ridiculously hard aswell
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    (Original post by Acidy)
    Most med students definitely do not take a year out, they get in the first time. You had a much tougher experience than the average applicant.
    Thank you for your insight.
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    (Original post by HaQ_mAn_)
    Thank you for your insight.
    No problem. I'm always happy to save the lives of tax payers.
 
 
 
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