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    (Original post by zippity.doodah)
    I personally don't even think sports should be a lesson in school; school is for learning, not exercise. 'think exercise is fine and dandy? okay, but try and objectively justify why it should be "a lesson" in school when it could be just another break time? should kids be forced to learn? perhaps (I personally don't think so), should kids be forced to exercise? **** no - the government's role is not to make kids fitter
    What a ridiculous load of BS. So in your view kids should not be taught from a young age how to be healthy or the clear benefits of regular exercise?


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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I do archery which is the least sporty sport there is. So there...

    And yeah, maybe if I hadn't been bullied I wouldn't be ill.
    I do golf, even less sporty

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    I didn't bother turning up to Sports Day most of the time, it was easy enough to avoid it at my school even though it was 'compulsory'. I don't think it should be banned, I mean if you don't like it, just don't go.
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    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    Thanks for the link. "The latest figures, for 2012/13, show that 18.9% of children in Year 6 (aged 10-11) were obese and a further 14.4% were overweight. "

    That's 33.3% of kids that are overweight or obese at the end of primary school. If that's your argument AGAINST my assertion, then I don't even know what to say! That's a disgustingly high number.
    Ho-ho-ho, however, mister Rapaz, allow us to examine your original statement!

    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    British kids in general are extremely lazy and overweight
    That sounds eerily like an assertion that the majority of British kids are overweight, which - using those awfully handy, new-fangled doo-hickeys called statistics - we now know is an absurd claim. :lol:

    tl;dr Criticise British obesity-rates all you want, I'll support you; don't make ridiculous generalisations, though.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Why?
    We are not forced to do particular subjects at A Level if we don't want to. What's the difference?

    Bull. Fitness is 80% or more of sporting ability, 90% for track events. They're just running, dude; there IS no technique involved unless you're competing at a semi-professional level or above. Long jump is just running and jumping, high jump is high jumping, 100m is running fast, and 1500m is running for a longer period of time. If you are not fit, you will not do well in sports*. If you are fit, you will. It's that simple, and is really not up for discussion.
    Perhaps this would be adequate for a primary school Sports Day, yet in a secondary sports day you are competing against those who are using the correct technique. Thus, your fitness will not earn you any medals.

    Other variables are not so easily changeable. Genetics are also at play - how your body is built, for example.

    Some people are different and some people are bad at sport. If you told somebody who was bad at English to "go and read books every day": yes, it would improve some aspects of the subject but it would not change the fundamental fact that they can not think abstractly or creatively.

    Sport is fun if you put effort into it (you don't have to have natural talent, either; I'm terrible at footie but still enjoy playing it with mates occasionally). In my experience, the kids at school who find subjects "boring" are just lazy. Learning is always enjoyable if you choose to enjoy it. Somehow, I doubt you'll agree.
    Why would I decide to put effort into researching something that doesn't interest me? Different people have different passions (I hope that that is obvious...) and some things, like sport, might not come under those passions. Different people also have different ways of thinking - some emotionally, some mathematically - so different subjects will not be of interest to the individual. I do not consider interest to be something that you "choose". My sister did not enjoy maths because she didn't think mathematically. Again, learn to recognise differences.

    No it isn't, and no it doesn't. Go to the park and run for an hour each day, drink 4 litres of water daily, eat plenty of fruit and vegetables, and don't eat junk-food. Don't make excuses for not being able to do exercise, either. If you've got a knee injury, go swimming, or join a pilates class.
    It does depend on various things; I didn't realise that I would have to explain. If you are overweight, it will require more effort. If you are older, it will require more (or, depending on age, less) effort. Also, the routine you have described is more of a lifestyle choice, something which is not easy.

    It looks like we are back to recognising differences. Something that you consider to be easy will not apply to everyone.
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    Sports day should be fully optional. It's not like it will make any difference to the "obesity" problem people mention about. If someone was obese from a lack of exercise (not medical issues etc.) a sports day won't change their attitudes (unless it's the cause of an epiphany, which I doubt.) Sports day should be purely optional solely for the entertainment of the participants.

    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Are you saying that PE/games/sports lessons should be optional throughout your school life? That is a ridiculous suggestion if so.

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    I don't think P.E. lessons should be banned, but the curriculum needs to be seriously overhauled. P.E. is the main reason I have absolutely hated sports like rugby and football, then in tennis because I was always paired up with someone who didn't give a s***.

    Baseball was good compared to many other sports, and I loved dodge ball, but we only ever done dodge ball once a year as a fun lesson or a reward.

    We done rugby and football in the rain and frost and inside sports in the summer bizarrely.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Ho-ho-ho, however, mister Rapaz, allow us to examine your original statement!



    That sounds eerily like an assertion that the majority of British kids are overweight, which - using those awfully handy, new-fangled doo-hickeys called statistics - we now know is an absurd claim. :lol:

    tl;dr Criticise British obesity-rates all you want, I'll support you; don't make ridiculous generalisations, though.

    Semantics :sleep:

    Perhaps I should've said "lazy and/or overweight", and then we could have avoided this whole tedious exchange.
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    We are not forced to do particular subjects at A Level if we don't want to. What's the difference?

    I wasn't aware you were forced to compete in sports days at A-level, either, but you haven't answered the question: "Why should kids not be forced to perform in activities that are not included in their regular curriculum?" Having the courage to try new things is an important skill.


    Perhaps this would be adequate for a primary school Sports Day, yet in a secondary sports day you are competing against those who are using the correct technique. Thus, your fitness will not earn you any medals.

    You are still wildly over-estimating the effect technique has on performance at this level of competition. I'm not going to discuss this point any further if you refuse to

    Other variables are not so easily changeable. Genetics are also at play - how your body is built, for example.

    Reasonable excuse for not winning races, lame excuse for not competing.

    Some people are different and some people are bad at sport. If you told somebody who was bad at English to "go and read books every day": yes, it would improve some aspects of the subject but it would not change the fundamental fact that they can not think abstractly or creatively.

    Some people are undoubtedly better than others, but hard work will always go further than natural talent alone. As for your English example: how do you know that they "can't" think abstractly or creatively? These are skills which can be improved, just like anything else.


    Why would I decide to put effort into researching something that doesn't interest me? Different people have different passions (I hope that that is obvious...) and some things, like sport, might not come under those passions. Different people also have different ways of thinking - some emotionally, some mathematically - so different subjects will not be of interest to the individual. I do not consider interest to be something that you "chose". My sister did not enjoy maths because she didn't think mathematically. Again, learn to recognise differences.

    You are exemplifying the attitude I was referring to: "Why should I make the effort?", "Why should I invest into something that doesn't immediately interest me?" This is pure laziness.

    It does depend on various things; I didn't realise that I would have to explain. If you are overweight, it will require more effort. If you are older, it will require more (or, depending on age, less) effort. Also, the routine you have described is more of a lifestyle choice, something which is not easy.

    Excuses. Everything worth doing is hard at first.

    It looks like we are back to recognising differences. Something that you consider to be easy will not apply to everyone.
    I would be grateful if you could desist from using the childish tone ("I didn't realise that...", "Again, ...", "It looks like...") in future; it riles people, and injects an unpleasant immaturity into discussions.

    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    Semantics :sleep:

    Perhaps I should've said "lazy and/or overweight", and then we could have avoided this whole tedious exchange.
    Well, not really. You claimed that British teenagers are generally lazy and overweight, which is un-true, as the majority are not.

    Perhaps. :^_^:
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    In my primary school everyone had to take part in sports day, but we were in teams involving all year groups and we just did fun stuff like egg and spoon races, so no one really cared lol at middle school most people participated, but again it was teams and people volunteered to represent their tutor group. In my high school only year 10 do sports day but we do it in houses. So you'd have about 200 possible people who could volunteer and even then, most people did more than 1 event so you'd actually only end up with about 20 people participating for their house.

    It really brought us together, it didn't matter how bad you are because you'd have about 200 people cheering you on. I remember 2 boys did the long distance run for their house, they were actually kicked out of core PE because they were so bad lol, but they decided to stick it out and run together, everyone went mental when they crossed the finish line even though they were last

    We had a school run each year in High School too, but people would dress up as characters from Mario kart and throw bananas at the crowd lol

    edit: I don't think people should be forced into it though, I hated it in my last years of primary school because my teacher used to make fun of me in PE
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    (Original post by Unsworth)

    How were they detrimental to the former two?

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    As it put me off sport.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I was thinking more along the lines of the mug and spoon race - where the first person to the finish line gets to spoon with a girl platonically for 15 seconds, as long as he understands the nature of their relationship.

    This is followed by the hope jump, where the participants see how high their hopes can soar, before crashing down to earth.

    Also the 4 x 400 Introversion relay. This can take up to 6 days to complete.
    Let us not forget the Friend Zone Race: see who can complete the circuit from timid introductory handshake to the official Friend Zoning text in the quickest time.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    Let us not forget the Friend Zone Race: see who can complete the circuit from timid introductory handshake to the official Friend Zoning text in the quickest time.
    I think this is one of those events where competitors would be constantly pushing the boundaries of human achievement.
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    What a ridiculous load of BS. So in your view kids should not be taught from a young age how to be healthy or the clear benefits of regular exercise?


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    every heard of a little thing called parental responsibility?
    if exercise is so important, and we publicise educational facilities, should be publicise gymnasiums for kiddies as well?
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I think this is one of those events where competitors would be constantly pushing the boundaries of human achievement.
    Why Mr d'Arcy let us continue our intercourse as Friends ; you are in truth a very amusing fellow and light up the tea table with your gay chitchat. I must away to Chittering St Giles where Capt. Daventport of the King's Heavily Hung Dragoons awaits impatiently to give me a good rogering in his private conveyance.
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    I, like most other young people in Britain, have just participated in the annual Sports Day. Being somebody who is not particularly gifted in sport, I have never enjoyed a Sports Day nor have I been successful in my chosen events. Understandably, 1.the prospect of being humiliated in front of your school is not something to look forward to.

    Do you think that Sports Day should be 2.banned/compulsory? If someone were to suggest that everyone has to play an instrument in front of the entire school, everyone would consider it baloney. 3.Why it is different for sport, I don't know.

    I assume that most people would say that sports day is fantastic for the "together-ness" of the day. However, in my experience, it is remarkably easy to avoid events or the actual day itself. 4.The participants in the races are, naturally, people who are good at sport.

    I think that the communal aspect is great, however, I think that there should be an academic opportunity for those who aren't good at sport.

    What do you think?
    1. It was not mate to be humiliating and I don't think it is even if you come last in your event.
    2. Banned/No Compulsory/Yes(or only 1/4 of the school would turn up)
    3.Because everybody can do sport, the ability is varied. Not everybody can play an instrument.
    5. If only good people participate then when would the (not as good) people be humiliated then?:confused:
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    it should be optional, in my school it was compulsory and they even published all the results up on a board in order which is complete bull****, imagine you came last and it was put up for the whole school to see
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    I have mild dyspraxia meaning I am pretty terrible at most competitive sports, namely anything requiring speed or coordination (instead I do long distance running/cycling but that's another story)

    But I always loved sports day. Secondary school sports day was even better, I no longer had to make a fool of myself competing and there was an ice-cream van and it was always beautiful weather. I was sad to miss it this year bc I was on study leave

    If you're terrible at sport but someone who perhaps doesn't deal with losing very well I can understand how it can be distressing but banning it just seems like a childish act. We all have our virtues after all

    Edit: agree with P.E. being optional from your GCSE year however. I spent the majority of yr11 out of P.E due to injury and the amount of time it gave me to study instead of prancing about playing netball terribly was very worthwhile.
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    I'll be honest I hated sports day in school.
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    I can't say I particularly liked it, but I can't really say I want it banned, it's probably the only time of year where some form of competition is actually encouraged. It's not like it hurts anybody either (figuratively).
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    In my secondary school fortunately only the elite participants got chosen to take part in sports day, much to my delight. The rest of us were allowed to watch sports day for 1 hour. P.E lessons were much more humiliating.
 
 
 
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