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    (Original post by TheTranshumanist)
    Thanks
    You're welcome, hope you enjoy it there!
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    What made studying law so enjoyable? And what studying method would you recommend? Studying everyday?
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    (Original post by Coolsbreeze)
    What made studying law so enjoyable? And what studying method would you recommend? Studying everyday?

    The variety of areas covered, the chance to do your own research, the fact that it relates to everyday life.
    Set yourself time each day to do the required reading so as not to get behind, but you can't be expected to be studying constantly.
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    How long are tutorials?
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    (Original post by Coolsbreeze)
    How long are tutorials?

    Tutorials are 1hr. Seminars can be 2hrs.
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    I'm a little confused the seminars are they lectures? or are they something different?
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    (Original post by Coolsbreeze)
    I'm a little confused the seminars are they lectures? or are they something different?
    They're basically the same as tutorials but have slightly more people in them, and are in a seminar room whereas tutorials are in the tutors' offices.
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    (Original post by Maura Kat)
    could you share on the following.
    1) answering exam questions. (please don't just say IRAC and then disappear)
    2) answer formats for say criminal and constitutional law?
    3) how did you tackle contract questions?
    I can perhaps help you with your 2nd question (re. constitutional exam) having done it earlier this year... I've finished 1st year now. Constitutional is different because the module is split into 2 - constitutional law and judicial review (administrative law). The exam is split into 2 sections, 4 questions each - the first 4 questions are constitutional and the second 4 are judicial review. Constitutional questions I'm sure have only essay questions, no problem ones and judicial review has a mixture of both.

    I don't know how much you know but the constitutional part is political i.e. House of Commons/Lords, voting, ministerial responsibility, devolution, Scottish independence and parliamentary sovereignty including EU law and ECHR - this will all be essay based so it'd typically be answered as an argument and you'll still have to have some knowledge of cases to illustrate and support the points you made.

    Similarly, the essay questions for judicial review will be answered in the format described as above but the problem questions follow a different structure from typical law problem questions (e.g. tort, contract etc.) because the cases are judicial review cases. You'll be made aware of the format for JR questions but it generally goes as follows:

    - identify issue. Does claimant have (legal) standing?
    - grounds - irrationality/illegality/procedural impropriety (there are more heads under these headings but I can't remember them off the top of my head)
    - remedies
    - conclusion - outcome of the case - does claimant or defendant succeed?

    Sorry if that's a bit lengthy but I hope it helped - it was just fresh in my head lol.
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    What happens if you meet all the requirements to get into Leicester uni such as 5 GCSE or equivalent including English Language and your Alevel grades but you Have a D in maths? and planning on retaking in November?
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    (Original post by salmaibra)
    What happens if you meet all the requirements to get into Leicester uni such as 5 GCSE or equivalent including English Language and your Alevel grades but you Have a D in maths? and planning on retaking in November?

    I think you'd be best ringing the university for information like that, I don't know what they'd say and would hate to give you the wrong answer!
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    (Original post by ellkins)
    They're basically the same as tutorials but have slightly more people in them, and are in a seminar room whereas tutorials are in the tutors' offices.
    What is usually discussed in seminars?
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    (Original post by Coolsbreeze)
    What is usually discussed in seminars?

    The same as tutorials, you do the reading and prepare in advance answers to the questions which are set, and then discuss them as a group. Mixtures of problems questions and essay questions.
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    I really wanted to go to Leicester for Law but secret life of students made it look really bad and depressing. I know this is stupid but can I have so reassurance that the university is fun and not depressing haha?

    Also, do you like the city? Quite a few people complain about it, but when I visited the city centre it was lovely! But obviously living there is different

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    (Original post by Raddy49)
    I really wanted to go to Leicester for Law but secret life of students made it look really bad and depressing. I know this is stupid but can I have so reassurance that the university is fun and not depressing haha?

    Also, do you like the city? Quite a few people complain about it, but when I visited the city centre it was lovely! But obviously living there is different

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    Hahah that show was so awful and I wish it had never been on air! It really isn't that bad, there's so much going on and loads of stuff to get involved with, whether that's nights out or societies etc. You may feel down at times wherever you go, that's just part of moving somewhere new and getting to grips with it. It's really not a depressing place, honestly! I wouldn't have completed three years there if it was
    The city is nice, it has its bad areas but there are some really lovely parts, and some great places to eat or shop. I guess it's quite a small city but there's still plenty to do. There's a really nice area round by the cathedral with lots of independent shops which is worth a visit.
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    (Original post by ellkins)
    I think you'd be best ringing the university for information like that, I don't know what they'd say and would hate to give you the wrong answer!
    Thanks i've emailed Admission
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    do you have to put in crazy hours? How much exams and coursework is there in the first year?
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    When are you starting work at mcdonalds?
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    (Original post by ellkins)
    Hahah that show was so awful and I wish it had never been on air! It really isn't that bad, there's so much going on and loads of stuff to get involved with, whether that's nights out or societies etc. You may feel down at times wherever you go, that's just part of moving somewhere new and getting to grips with it. It's really not a depressing place, honestly! I wouldn't have completed three years there if it was
    The city is nice, it has its bad areas but there are some really lovely parts, and some great places to eat or shop. I guess it's quite a small city but there's still plenty to do. There's a really nice area round by the cathedral with lots of independent shops which is worth a visit.
    Thank you so much for the reassurance!!!

    I think I'll apply now

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    So that must be time consuming if each class has a lecture, seminar and tutorial. Which are more important when exam time comes? And what did you do to not get homesick?
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    (Original post by salmaibra)
    do you have to put in crazy hours? How much exams and coursework is there in the first year?

    I wouldn't say you have to put in crazy hours in first year, just enough that you complete all the reading and don't get behind. 2nd and 3rd years are where the workload will go up considerably more so you could start getting used to this in 1st year! There are exams in January and then in May/June and there will be practice essays too, but if I recall correctly there are no assessed essays. (May be wrong on that though)
 
 
 
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