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What were your "wow we're poor" or "wow we are well off" moments when you were a kid? Watch

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    We were quite poor when we were younger. Once or twice a year my parents would take us to McDonalds as a real treat. However as a family of six they could only afford 4 cheeseburgers for us. They had to pack extra drinks and sandwiches for themselves
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    Just normal, not rich or poor just in the comfortable middle.

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    When I realised we were struggling at times - when my mum took out a Provident loan
    When I realised we were actually ok financially - when my papa got his kidney removed and his knee surgery done privately and when he paid for me to go to Iceland for my 21st which was also my first holiday abroad. He offered to send me to Disneyland and other places when I was a kid but my mum has a fear of flying so I had to wait until I was older and then go with my bf.

    We were never poor and we were never rich. My mum had a few bumpy times here and there money wise as she was a single parent but my gran and papa helped her out as much as they could. My papa was an engineer back in the day so he had a lot of money from that and he was also a lecturer but had to retire at 50 due to rheumatoid arthritis which left him housebound for years in pain and he also had an accident just before he retired so he got a lot of money from that as well.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    I'll spend the next 15 minutes deciding whether I will.. I've always imagined TSR people quite judgemental on peoples upbringing.
    TBH I don't find that at all - TSR folk seem to be quite easy going generally. I should tell all, you will feel better for it.
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    Being bought clothes a few sizes too big. 'You'll grow into them' they said.
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    Skipping meals, cold showers, eating discounted stale bread with margarine for lunch, probably more but ye hardtimes. Still are tbh
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    I was actually very ignorant of our family finances, and had no real comparison.

    Looking back on it growing up we rather well of, I realized that we went abroad(pretty much everywhere) over fifty times in a five year period, and travelled up and down the UK every other weekend, which must have cost my parents a bomb and a half.(And also explains where my dads military pension went).

    But then times got hard, jobs were lost and lesser paying ones gained and it wasn't till I was Seventeen that I realized that we were cutting back on everything, but then I up and leaft home anyway so it didn't effect me >.>.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    For me there were a few things that made it plainly obvious we were struggling financially top ones would probably be.

    - When my mum had to work Christmas eve and Christmas day when we were kids because she couldn't afford not to take the shifts.

    -When my packed lunches were bread and butter (before they started offering us free school lunches).

    -Most of my clothes were second hand or hand me downs, own clothes days at school were just a recipe for bullying.

    -When a pack of biscuits or crisps was a major treat

    - the look of confusion and pity on friends faces when they asked me what I got for Christmas or birthdays, that one was probably one the worst.

    -hearing my mum cry at night on the phone about money, that's when I realised mainly and stopped asking for things.

    -never using the heating

    Despite all that I had a great childhood my mum always took great care of us and despite being poor we hardly ever felt it as children.
    When i ended up making excuses to my friends for doing stuff outside of school because i knew we could not afford the cinema and eating out etc and didn't wanna stress my mum out by asking her for money she didn't have.I literally dreaded being asked to do something out of school.


    It's good to look back and see how things have changed. Really makes me appreciate my life now so much more
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    Another point which will probably make me seem stuck-up. When shopping, financial situations become much more aware.

    For example: I always seem to get strange looks from a few strangers whenever I am holding a Harvey Nichols' bag, or a Waitrose bag.

    It just makes one aware that many people cannot go to 'good' shops, and that many luxuries are taken advantage of, even in good areas of cities, in the 21st century.

    Only recently did I discover that most people do not spend £125 on a pair of trousers...
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    I never thought about it much until I transferred to a private school aged 9, at which point I felt both rich and poor at the same time.
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    (Original post by Yasmin25)
    When I realised we were struggling at times - when my mum took out a Provident loan
    When I realised we were actually ok financially - when my papa got his kidney removed and his knee surgery done privately and when he paid for me to go to Iceland for my 21st which was also my first holiday abroad. He offered to send me to Disneyland and other places when I was a kid but my mum has a fear of flying so I had to wait until I was older and then go with my bf.

    We were never poor and we were never rich. My mum had a few bumpy times here and there money wise as she was a single parent but my gran and papa helped her out as much as they could. My papa was an engineer back in the day so he had a lot of money from that and he was also a lecturer but had to retire at 50 due to rheumatoid arthritis which left him housebound for years in pain and he also had an accident just before he retired so he got a lot of money from that as well.
    I'm sorry to hear about your papa my mum has rheumatoid arthritis as well so I know how painful it can be for the family member
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    This, most certainly isn't a place I'm willing to discuss mine, or my parents misfortune so willingly.
    I don't see why you bothered commenting...

    (Original post by EatAndRevise)
    Just seeing people in beat-up, old (More than 3 year-old) cars. Which in contrast to the cars we had, and still have, highlights the situation to a certain extent.
    You consider 3 year-old cars as beat-up and old?
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    (Original post by TheGuyReturns)
    I don't see why you bothered commenting...



    You consider 3 year-old cars as beat-up and old?
    I don't necessarily consider them "beat-up", but I consider them relatively old.
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    (Original post by Kenan and Kel)
    Being bought clothes a few sizes too big. 'You'll grow into them' they said.
    My mum did this with my school blazer, I looked so silly. And then the silly school decided to change the school uniform later on in the year so she had to buy another one and ti was really expensive for the specific skirt as well so I had the same skirt and blazer for 4 years until I got a new skirt because it got too small, kept the same blazer for the rest of school though
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    Very refreshing to see this type of thread, thank you for creating

    One lesson i learnt during my childhood + from parents is to save up and little by little - it'll grow and be worth something one day even if it means very few (if any) "new" stuff. The second lesson i learnt thru childhood is never to envy others cos you don't know their "story" and appearance is often misleading then we start to make assumptions like "what-ifs we had ...." and "imagine being that kid with ...".

    My dad worked in a corner shop since 18, now 47, and still does but saved any money he had from day 1. I appreciate that he works all year round only holidays being Christmas day, Boxing day and New Years day (i think loln). At first when we were younger we lived with family and friends at 2/3 different places and then moved into a terrace same street as the shop. It was nice that older cousins passed on stuff to us mainly lego lol. But i think because most people around us were similar in terms of situation we sorta didn't have anything to compare it too + it helped we had uniform at primary and high school. Cricket and football in the street with anyone around and about most days was more fun than anything else. One thing that people may find odd is that my younger brother (2 years younger) passed his clothes down (or up :P) to me and they still fit lol.

    Still remember during high school, old/ancient golf VW that used to squeal (painful to the ears) every time you braked/slowed down/moved the wheel (getting very anxious when being picked up/dropped off at high school) - But mainly after saving up and sacrificing in the short-term at 12/13 we moved into a bigger house (very quiet/posh area) and and bought new stuff like clothes - still fit to this date (19 now) and better car

    Also it's not for me to judge what type of childhood (try hard not to compare) however overall i'm glad we were able to see the difference so that we can appreciate it when you do have a laptop or an ipod or able to go to the store and buy fruit(still too expensive imo - should be free!) you understand and feel how lucky you are - then once in that position be able to help others.

    Sorry for the long(ish) post. It's nice to reminisce whilst writing (maybe cathartic??). Writing for me more than anything else (using Eminem lyrics, different context) so to reduce the chances of "my ego inflating".
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    (Original post by CocoaPowder)
    When i ended up making excuses to my friends for doing stuff outside of school because i knew we could not afford the cinema and eating out etc and didn't wanna stress my mum out by asking her for money she didn't have.I literally dreaded being asked to do something out of school.


    It's good to look back and see how things have changed. Really makes me appreciate my life now so much more
    Yeah it was really once in a blue moon i got to do something like that and usually it would be because my granddad gave me money as my mum couldn't
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I'm sorry to hear about your papa my mum has rheumatoid arthritis as well so I know how painful it can be for the family member
    Yeah he's had it for about 15 yrs now and he still hasn't really got it 100% under control he gets about now and walks ok most of the time but you can see in his face that every step is a struggle and he's on some of the strongest painkillers out there and a lot of the time it doesn't make much of a difference to the pain. He doesn't let it get him down any more. I suppose after a while you just accept it? Sorry to hear your mum has it too my gran has it as well but just in her hands so its nowhere near as bad as my papa since he pretty much has it in all his joints.
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    (Original post by TheGuyReturns)
    I don't see why you bothered commenting...



    You consider 3 year-old cars as beat-up and old?
    Extra post count, obviously.
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    I've experienced both, the first was when I realised what my mum had to give for me. And the latter was when we started to go on holidays abroad and when I started a school in a more well off area.


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    (Original post by zazalla.)
    Skipping meals, cold showers, eating discounted stale bread with margarine for lunch, probably more but ye hardtimes. Still are tbh
    Ah I remember when our shower and boiler broke and I had to wash my hair in the sink with cold water, was horrid! Still hard times for us as well, I just understand it more now.
 
 
 
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